Thoughts of a Special Collections Intern

[As told by Amanda Wentworth]: As someone who relatively recently became interested in the wonderful world of librarianship, it was not too long ago that the term “Special Collections” would’ve passed through the air over my head with no recognition and no further consideration.

Read more of this post

Alan Witt, Milne’s New Business Librarian

Milne Library is delighted to welcome our new Business Librarian, Alan Witt, who comes to us from Rivier University, New Hampshire. Alan has B.A.s in Archeology & Medieval Studies from Wesleyan University in Connecticut, & an M.A. in History (Medieval Studies) & a Master’s in Library & Information Studies from the University of Rhode Island.

As you might expect from his educational background, Alan has a wide & eclectic group of interests & activities, including playing board games & gaming in general; acapella music ranging from medieval madrigals to modern pop, aikido (a martial art), baking breads & cookies, & reading, particularly fantasy & sci-fi (e.g., George RR Martin & Jim Butcher). And like many of Milne’s librarians, he is owned by a cat, Alaric.

Since arriving here in Geneseo in November Alan has been working with the faculty of the School of Business to expand the library’s business-related research classes & is looking forward to working with students on their business assignments. You can find Alan on the main floor of Milne Library in the Instruction Librarian “fishbowl,” or reach him at [email protected]. Welcome, Alan…we’re really glad you’re here!

High 5

HI5Go to a library & high-five as many people as possible.

This is part of Steve Kemple’s EveryLibrary Artist-In-Residency project “We’re In This Together.”

If you love libraries, consider taking action to support them by donating, signing a petition, or signing up to support them at www.action.everylibrary.org

Brandon West, Our New Social Science Librarian

BWestMilne Library is excited to welcome Brandon West as our new Social Sciences Reference & Instruction Librarian. Brandon joins us from SUNY Oswego where he was the Online Instruction/Instructional Design Librarian. In addition to teaching information literacy classes he used his extensive knowledge of online teaching and learning, instructional design and pedagogy to help faculty and staff develop and deliver both in-person and online courses.

Here at Geneseo, Brandon will be the liaison to the Anthropology, Psychology, Sociology, and Political Science Departments, and will work closely with faculty, students, and staff to help them with their information literacy, research, and collection development needs.

Prior to working in an academic environment, Brandon worked at the Grand Rapids Public Library in Grand Rapids, MI; he is also a former elementary school teacher, having been a fourth grade teacher in Charleston, SC.

Brandon received his B.A. at Grand Valley State University in English and Elementary Education, his M.Ed. from Grand Valley State University in Educational Technology, and his M.L.S. from Texas Woman’s University. As a life-long learner, he is currently pursuing a Certificate of Graduate Study in Online Learning and Teaching from the University at Albany.

In Brandon’s spare time he is the member of many national library committees and teams, such as the ACRL Instruction Session Teaching Methods Committee, the ALA GLBT Round Table, and he co-chairs the ACRL Distance Learning Section Awards Committee. In his spare, spare time he enjoys traveling, taste testing new restaurants, and parenting his two cat children.

Scholarly Publishing Across the Disciplines: Interviews with Geneseo Faculty: Faculty value of scholarly collaboration, communications, and output

Scholarly Publishing Across the Disciplines: Interviews with Geneseo Faculty

Part IV: Faculty value of scholarly collaboration, communications, and output

SCPublished.SliderThe fourth part of Milne Library’s ongoing series about Geneseo research and publishing practices is now available (PDF). Faculty value of scholarly collaboration, communications and output documents faculty collaborations in research and publishing; faculty’s publishing motivations and influences; and the scholarly communication and output practices amongst the Geneseo faculty interviewed.

About the series:

The Milne Library Scholarly Communications team and librarian liaisons for the campus academic departments interviewed 87 faculty members in one-on-one conversations during the academic year 2010-11 and part of academic year 2011-12.  The results of these interviews were analyzed and documented in a series of reports which are on schedule for release from September 2013 – February 2014.

The interviews conducted with Geneseo faculty members were intended to be a survey of the current research and publishing practices on campus, giving us a glimpse of the issues affecting Geneseo faculty, including the changing scholarly publishing environment, digital and online scholarship, peer review, publishing with undergraduate researchers and open access.

The first three reports in the series document the issues and responses surrounding faculty and undergraduate students involved in research and publishing; the quickly changing environment surrounding digital scholarship and its value on campus and in the disciplines; and faculty participation in open access endeavors such as publishing in open access journals and self archiving of work. In particular, we look at ways in which the library may be able to meet the needs of new initiatives on campus.

To read the reports, please visit the Milne Library Scholarly Communication’s webpage at http://libguides.geneseo.edu/AcrosstheDisciplines

We welcome your feedback about the reports.  Send any comments or questions to Kate Pitcher at [email protected] or by phone at 585-245-5064.

 

What are we reading? Staff recommended reads for October

Are you looking for a good book to read?  Hundreds of thousands of books are published each year, so how does one choose? Read on for several Milne Library staff  book recommendations for the month of October.

In the mood for a spectacular YA fantasy?  Then read the following recommendation by Bill Jones, IDS Project Creative Technologist, for a truly amazing young adult novel:

The multiple award-winning YA novel, A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness, is a story filled with surreal illustrations and a captivating a-monster-callsstoryline that leaves the reader wondering what is in fact real and what is simply perceived to be.  The story is told through the eyes of a teenage boy named Conor, who describes his struggle in coming to terms with his mother’s cancer and the terrifying possibility of losing her.  Awakened from a nightmare, a monster comes to help Conor understand his future and admit truths that he holds deep inside.

Throughout the novel, the monster shares with Conor three stories to help him understand the truths of life and what lies ahead.  “The answer is that it does not matter what you think,” the monster said.  “Because your mind will contradict itself a hundred times each day. You wanted her to go at the same time you were desperate for me to save her. Your mind will believe comforting lies while also knowing the painful truths that make those lies necessary. And your mind will punish you for believing both.”

Check out Patrick Ness’ amazing three-part Chaos Walking Trilogy:  The Knife of Never Letting Go (2008), The Ask and the Answer (2010), and Monsters of Men (2010).
Download the free prequel of the trilogy, A New World, today from Amazon Kindle!

Special Collections Librarian Liz Argentieri recommends an Irish writer and a trilogy which broke numerous social and literary barriers when first released in the 1960s.

Edna O’Brien’s Country Girls trilogy includes The Country Girls (1960), The Lonely Girl (1962), Girls in Their Married Bliss (1964).  All three novels were then reissued together with an  Epilogue in 1987.country girls

The impetus to pick up Edna O’Brien’s Country Girls trilogy came from chancing upon a panel discussion of it on the Diane Rehm show last spring.  Dealing with growing up female and Catholic in mid-20th century Ireland, it sounded intriguing: controversial, daring, and literary.  And since I liked what I had read of O’Brien’s short stories, I thought I’d tackle her trilogy. I’m glad I did.

The novels center on Caithleen (“Kate”) Brady, mainly, and her friend Bridget (“Baba”) Brennan, whom we first meet as two young teenage girls living in a small Irish town and straining against the confines of their lives – as teenagers often will.  They are an unlikely pair, and I never did grow to like Baba. Throughout, she bullied Kate and quite literally led her astray, beginning with her orchestration of getting them both expelled from convent school (an opportunity Kate, whose mother had recently died and whose drunk of a father drifted in and out of her life (usually violently) could ill-afford to squander).  But Kate was not easy to root for either.  Watching her drift through her own life, allowing friends, family, and lovers to largely decide her course, often made for frustrating reading, and if it weren’t for her sweetness and vulnerability and the unfortunate events in her life that she truly was unable to control, I might have had less sympathetic feeling for her.

lonely girlThe tone and point of view of the narration shifts between Kate and Baba.  When Baba’s telling the story, the language is more lively, the attitude more devil-may-care, but I’m sure I sensed an underlying pathos in there, especially in the last novel and Epilogue, when the two had more or less “made their beds.”  A current of loneliness flows through Kate’s rather spare narrative voice, especially when she’s talking or thinking about her girlhood home, a run-down farm on the edge of town.  The language she uses to describe that place and her life there – which was not without happiness and love – evokes the stereotypical image of a rainy, damp, bleak Ireland.  The feeling carries through her days in Dublin as a shop girl and Baba’s reckless tag-along, her romantic misadventures with older married men, and her ultimate fate.

Are you a fan of contemporary literary fiction?  Librarian Kate Pitcher recommends Life After Life, the latest novel by Kate Atkinson:

Ursula Todd is born on a cold and blustery night in 1910, and then dies.  She is then reborn, living through her traumatic birth, until a tragic death by drowning.  Ursula is then reborn again, lives a happy but chaotic childhood and dies in a firebombing during World War II.   She is then reborn again.life after life

Kate Atkinson (author of the wonderful Jackson Brodie mystery novels; Case Histories, One Good Turn, When Will There Be Good News? and Started Early, Took My Dog) is an expert storyteller and a literary artist.  In her newest novel, she takes on an interesting device to tell the story of her heroine, Ursula Todd. What if your life didn’t really end at your death, rather, that your life is actually a series of lives as one person, and that you are destined to relive some of the same experiences over and over again, until you get it right?  This is the conceit that Atkinson employs to show Ursula’s development as a character and a person living through some of the worst calamities the human race has ever known – two World Wars and the almost entire destruction of people, namely those of the Jewish faith during the Holocaust.

Atkinson’s novel explores Ursula’s surreal sense of déjà vu and it works – the reader plays along and relives these lives; each one slightly different than the one prior, depending on how Ursula “learned” from that life.  What captures the reader’s imagination is the authors’ shaping of the narrative; how she uses the same plot and events, but almost every chapter reads like a different story.  It is a completely inventive and captivating story and engages the reader from page one, until the end, when we are left with the desire to relive those lives all over again.  Highly recommended, especially for fans of literary fiction and authors such as Margaret Atwood and Jennifer Egan.

2013.OctSR

 

Scholarly Publishing across the Disciplines: Interviews with Geneseo Faculty

CostelloPeckInterviewThe Milne Library Scholarly Communications team and librarian liaisons for the campus academic departments interviewed 87 faculty members in one-on-one conversations during the academic year 2010-11 and part of academic year 2011-12.  The results of these interviews were analyzed and documented in a series of reports which will be issued over the next few months.

The interviews conducted with Geneseo faculty members were intended to be a survey of the current research and publishing practices on campus, giving us a glimpse of the issues affecting Geneseo faculty, including the changing scholarly publishing environment, digital and online scholarship, peer review, publishing with undergraduate researchers and open access.

faculty interviews wordle.SMThe first two reports in this series (both released today) document the issues and responses surrounding faculty and undergraduate students involved in research and publishing and the quickly changing environment surrounding digital scholarship and its value on campus and in the disciplines.  In particular, we look at ways in which the library may be able to meet the needs of new initiatives on campus.

To read the reports, please visit the Milne Library Scholarly Communications’ webpage at http://libguides.geneseo.edu/AcrossTheDisciplines

We welcome your feedback about the reports.  Send any comments or questions to Kate Pitcher at [email protected] or by phone at 585-245-5064.

Milne Library Scholarly Communications Team

 

Milne Librarians, Published!

LILACCongratulations to Milne Librarians, Kim Hoffman and Michelle Costello on the recent publication of their article,

Davies-Hoffman, K., Alvarez, B., Costello, M., & Emerson, D. (2013). Keeping pace with information literacy instruction for the real world: When will MLS programs wake up and smell the LILACs? Communications in Information Literacy, 7 (1), 9-23.

Communications in Information Literacy is a peer-reviewed, open access journal dedicated to advancing knowledge, theory, and research in information literacy.

Conceiving and implementing LILAC (not just once, but twice! as well as inspiring several similar programs) and now publishing to advocate change in the education of future librarians; they’re making an impact! Nice work, ladies!

Curious about the Library Instruction Leadership Academy (LILAC)? You can take a look at the “greatest hits” video from the most recent series to get an idea of how it has impacted the latest group of librarians in the program. You can also learn about the first series in an earlier blog post from 2010.

And let’s not forget that in 2011, The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) selected Kim and Michelle to receive its Instruction Section (IS) Innovation award for their work in developing LILAC.

When you check out the article, also be sure to look for comments from Alyse Hennig, Geneseo-grad-turned-Librarian too!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Library Publishing Toolkit – a new and free e-book

LPT CoverMilne Library is pleased to announce the publication of a new book, researched and edited by Milne staff member Allison Brown and published through the IDS Project Press:

Interested in library publishing services?
Thinking about publishing a book or journal, or helping authors do so?

The Library Publishing Toolkit looks at the broad and varied landscape of library publishing through discussions, case studies, and shared resources. From supporting writers, authors, and filmmakers in the public library setting to academic libraries hosting open access journals and books, this collection examines opportunities for libraries to leverage their skills and resources to curate, create and provide access to content.

Both public and academic libraries are invested in the creation and distribution of information and digital content. They have morphed from keepers of content into content creators and curators, and seek best practices and efficient workflows with emerging publishing platforms and services.

The Library Publishing Toolkit is a project funded partially by Regional Bibliographic Databases and Interlibrary Resources Sharing Program funds which are administered and supported by the Rochester Regional Library Council. The toolkit is a united effort between Milne Library at SUNY Geneseo and the Monroe County Library System to identify trends in library publishing, seek out best practices to implement and support such programs, and share the best tools and resources.

For more information and access to the book, please visit http://www.publishingtoolkit.org

Milne Library Publishes Its First Original Monograph!

Tagging Along CoverMilne Library is pleased to announce the publication of Tagging Along: Memories of My Grandfather, James Wolcott Wadsworth, Jr., by Stuart Symington, Jr., the first of what Milne hopes will be a long run of original titles published by the library through the CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform. This handsome 131-page, illustrated book is now available from Amazon.com, on a print-on-demand basis, for under $10. It will also be freely accessible in Open Monographs Press beginning in July.

A small group of librarians-cum-editors began working last fall with the author, who is the son of  U.S. Senator Stuart Symington, Sr., and Evelyn Wadsworth Symington, daughter of U.S. Senator James W. Wadsworth, Jr., of Geneseo. With Symington, the editorial team worked out style issues, added photographs, and designed the cover and layout for the book–everything, in short, that publishing houses do to ready a book for publication. Milne Library then uploaded the electronic file of the book to CreateSpace, and descriptive and ordering information for the book appeared in Amazon.com. When copies are ordered, CreateSpace will print them for Amazon to ship. It’s a publishing model that Milne has been using in conjunction with hosting the open access ebook versions on Open Monograph Press. The initiative began last fall, when Milne issued Recollections of 3 Rebel Prisons, by G. G. Prey, the first title in its Genesee Valley Historical Reprint series.

 Symington with his grandfather, James W. Wadsworth, Jr., in Paris during WW II

Symington with his grandfather, James W. Wadsworth, Jr., in Paris during WW II

Tagging Along recalls the time Symington spent with his “kind, wise, generous, and very patient grandfather.” The story of “Grampa” Wadsworth’s political career and private life, woven together with the author’s memories and impressions of long childhood visits to his grandparents’ home and farms in Geneseo, is set against the rich background of Wadsworth family history. As SUNY Geneseo President Christopher Dahl says in the book’s foreword, Tagging Along is “a lively, affectionate memoir of a politician and statesman who was present at some of the major events of the twentieth century, a man who represents a conservative tradition rooted in respect for the soil and responsibility to his community–a tradition, sadly, very little in evidence in today’s civic and political life.”

Stuart Symington, Jr., a retired member of the Missouri Bar and a fellow of the American Bar Foundation, was born in Rochester, N.Y., and spent much of his youth on the Niagara Frontier and in Washington, D.C. He served overseas in World War II and graduated from Yale University and Harvard Law School.