Get Graphic: Bringing Literature to Reluctant Readers

Using graphic novels in the classroom is a great way to bridge what students already know with what they have yet to learn. Graphic novels are multimodal and help facilitate and support students’ ability to visualize and understand complicated ideas. In addition to being manageable for students to read, they are relevant, engaging, and approachable. Milne Library has recently acquired a large collection of graphic novels in a variety of subjects, topics, and reading levels. For help finding graphic novels, visit the reference desk or contact the Education & Instructional Design librarian, Michelle Costello.

A sampling of graphic novels found in Milne Library:

Coral Reefs: Cities of the Ocean
by Maris Wicks.

juv 741.5 WIC

A look at ocean science covering the biology of coral reefs as well as their ecological importance.

Flying Couch: A Graphic Memoir
by Amy Kurzweil
juv 741.5 KUR

Flying couch tells the stories of three unforgettable women. Amy Kurzweil weaves her own coming-of-age as a young Jewish artist into the narrative of her mother, a psychologist, and Bubbe, her grandmother, a World War II survivor who escaped from the Warsaw Ghetto by disguising herself as a gentile. The voices and histories of these wise, hilarious, and very different women create a portrait not only of what it means to be part of a family, but also of how each generation bears the imprint of the past.

Frazzled: Everyday Disasters and Impending Doom
by Booki Vivat
juv F VIV

Nervous about middle school because her family does not get her and her friends know exactly what they want to do, Abbie Wu searches for her own passion before discovering a knack for leadership when injustices in the cafeteria come to light.

Such a Lovely Little War: Saigon, 1961-63 by Marcelino Truong ; translated by David Homel
ya 741.5 TRU

A memoir, in graphic novel form, on the early years of the Vietnam war through the eyes of a young Vietnamese boy.

The Maid of the Mist
by Tanya Anderson
juv 741.5 AND

In graphic novel format, retells the Native American legend about a young woman living along the Niagara River near its waterfalls who is transformed into a Thunder Being.

Sidewalk Flowers
by JonArno Lawson
juv P LAW

A little girl collects wildflowers while on a walk with her distracted father. Each flower becomes a gift, and whether the gift is noticed or ignored, both giver and recipient are transformed by their encounter.

Space Dumplins
by Craig Thompson
juv 741.5 THO

For Violet Marlocke, family is the most important thing in the whole galaxy. So when her father goes missing while on a hazardous job, she can’t just sit around and do nothing. To get him back, Violet throws caution to the stars and sets out with a group of misfit friends on a quest to find him. But space is big and dangerous, and she soon discovers that her dad has been swallowed by a giant, planet-eating whale. With her father’s life on the line, nothing is going to stop Violet from trying to rescue him and keep her family together.

El Deafo
by Cece Bell
juv 741.5 BEL

In this graphic novel memoir, author/illustrator Cece Bell chronicles her hearing loss at a young age and her subsequent experiences with the Phonic Ear, a very powerful–and very awkward–hearing aid. The Phonic Ear gives Cece the ability to hear–sometimes things she shouldn’t–but also isolates her from her classmates. She really just wants to fit in and find a true friend, someone who appreciates her as she is. After some trouble, she is finally able to harness the power of the Phonic Ear and become “El Deafo, Listener for All.” And more importantly, declare a place for herself in the world and find the friend she’s longed for.

Sisters
by Raina Telgemeier
juv 741.5 TEL

Three weeks.

Two sisters.

One car.

A true story.


Tippy and the Night Parade: A Toon Book

by Lilli Carré
juv 741.5 CAR

Follow Tippy on a nocturnal adventure through mist, up a mountain, down a hole and back home.

Alan Witt, Milne’s New Business Librarian

Milne Library is delighted to welcome our new Business Librarian, Alan Witt, who comes to us from Rivier University, New Hampshire. Alan has B.A.s in Archeology & Medieval Studies from Wesleyan University in Connecticut, & an M.A. in History (Medieval Studies) & a Master’s in Library & Information Studies from the University of Rhode Island.

As you might expect from his educational background, Alan has a wide & eclectic group of interests & activities, including playing board games & gaming in general; acapella music ranging from medieval madrigals to modern pop, aikido (a martial art), baking breads & cookies, & reading, particularly fantasy & sci-fi (e.g., George RR Martin & Jim Butcher). And like many of Milne’s librarians, he is owned by a cat, Alaric.

Since arriving here in Geneseo in November Alan has been working with the faculty of the School of Business to expand the library’s business-related research classes & is looking forward to working with students on their business assignments. You can find Alan on the main floor of Milne Library in the Instruction Librarian “fishbowl,” or reach him at witt@geneseo.edu. Welcome, Alan…we’re really glad you’re here!

How to Get Registered; Do It By Oct. 14th!

registeredRegister to Vote in the General Election by Oct. 14

Unless you have been living under a rock, you probably have heard the political attacks going back and forth between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Yes, it’s that magical time that arrives every four years – the general election! The general election is held on November 8, 2016. In this election, United States Citizens vote for more than just the President of the United States, they also vote for senators, seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, and more. Regardless of your opinion of the candidates or political orientation, voting is a civic responsibility and the outcome has a great impact on our society.

Who Can Vote?

If you are a legal U.S. citizen who will be 18 years of age by November 8, 2016, then you can register to vote.  However, you must be registered by October 14, 2016. You may print and mail in your voter registration or may register to vote online.

Residency Consideration

suffrageparade-in-ny-loc
Suffrage parade in New York, May 6, 1912. United States Library of Congress’s Prints and Photographs division. Public domain.

Students may establish voting residency in the place they consider their principal home, whether that be their current school address or at another address (such as a guardian’s address) they consider their primary residence (Brennan Center, 2016). If you have not declared Geneseo as your primary residence on your voter registration, then you need to apply for an absentee voting ballot.

register here

Image by Tony Webster from Portland, Oregon, United States. CC Attribution.

Absentee Voting

“Voters in New York must have an accepted reason to vote absentee, including the inability to vote in person due to physical disability or absence from the county in which one is registered (if a resident of New York City, then absence from the city), among others. Voters may submit their application for an absentee ballot by mail (postmarked) seven days before Election Day (2016: November 1) or in person by the end of the day before Election Day (2016: November 7). Completed ballots may be submitted in person by the close of polls on Election Day or by mail such that the ballot is postmarked by the day before the election (2016: November 7) and received within seven days of the election” (Brennan Center, 2016).

New York Board of Elections Absentee Ballot

Have Questions or Need Help?

Stop by the Milne Library Research Help Desk and a reference librarian will be happy to assist you.

References: 

Brennan Center for Justice. (2016). Student voting guide 2016. Retrieved from
http://www.brennancenter.org/how-vote-2016 

Written by Brandon West.

 

registereddeadline

Igniting a passion for STEM with rich and engaging resources

STEM
Image credit: FlickrUser natàlia i xavier de Lu2

Are you interested in learning more about STEM activities and resources. Would you like to explore ways to incorporate STEM across the curriculum with the goal of building student understanding?

Connecting hands-on STEM activities with books, games or manipulatives can be a great way to strengthen understanding and literacy skills while inspiring inquiry and creativity.

Milne Library has recently acquired a collection of STEM books, games, and manipulatives. These high quality resources illustrate activities that encourage scientific and artistic creativity and help increase student learning.

A few items found in the collection include:

Books
Getting the most out of makerspaces to create with 3-D printers by Nicki Peter Petrikowski
High-tech DIY projects with 3D printing by Maggie Murphy
Lego awesome ideas by Daniel Lipkowitz
STEM to story: enthralling and effective lesson plans for grades 5-8 by Jennifer Traig

Manipulatives
Hands-on soft geometric solids
Molymod organic teacher set
Lego Education. Duplo: Animal bingo kit
STEM: simple machines STEM activity set

Games
Ion: a compound building game by John J. Coveyou
Prime climb: the beautiful, colorful, mathematical game
Pandemic by Matt Leacock

To learn more about STEM resources contact the Education Librarian, Michelle Costello (costello@geneseo.edu).

In addition, read the following Education Update article by ASCD, “Teaching and Learning Resources for STEM Education.”

Presenting … Allison Brown, Milne’s Digital Publishing Services Manager

BrownAIt’s official — Allison Brown is Milne library’s new Digital Publishing Services Manager.  Allison was the successful candidate in last summer’s nationwide search to fill the newly-created position, bringing with her a proven track record of working with authors, navigating the publishing landscape, and producing a variety of publications.

Before you scratch your head too vigorously, wondering “But hasn’t Allison been here, doing that, long before this past summer?” — yes, she had been functioning as the digital publishing coordinator here in a temporary capacity for several years, and was instrumental in helping Milne build its publishing services from the ground up. The early projects, going back to 2012, include the Genesee Valley Historical Reprints Series (33 titles); Stuart Symington’s memoir, Tagging Along; and the first Proceedings of GREAT Day.

OpenSUNYTextbooksSince then, Allison has continued to produce more from Milne’s “press,” working closely with student groups, faculty, and emeriti at Geneseo and throughout SUNY. Among the current and ongoing projects she’s involved in is Open SUNY Textbooks,  for which she is project manager — working closely with authors and coordinating peer review, editing, and GDProceedingspublishing. She also continues to assist with production of the Proceedings of GREAT Day as well as advise for and coordinate publication of Gandy Dancer, the Geneseo-based, SUNY-wide student literary magazine edited by SUNY Geneseo students. With Gandy Dancer, Allison works closely with English professor Rachel Hall’s Editing & Production Workshop classes, both in and out of the classroom.

As Digital Publishing Services Manager, Allison manages to offer both publication assistance (production, project management, software training, etc.) to authors and experiential learning to the interns with whom she regularly works. She expects both areas to grow as more authors explore alternative publishing options, including open access (OA) publications and digital projects, and more students seek help with producing and managing their publications.

Allison earned a B.A. in English from Houghton College and an M.F.A. in creative writing from Emerson College in Boston. Prior to coming to Milne Library, she worked at Boston College’s library as a circulation desk assistant. Allison is an avid consumer of audio books since, she says, she seems to spend a lot of time in her car (much of it driving between her home in Rochester and work in Geneseo), and listening is a good way to use that time.

You can find Allison in her office (Milne 108) on the Library’s lower level, or contact her at browna@geneseo.edu or 585-245-6020.

Lesson Plans: Resources to Engage Students and Enhance Learning

MichellePostIt can be difficult to find the right website to use in lesson planning, specifically one that contains videos, activities, games or other engaging material. I am highlighting three that stand out: two because of their high-quality content & their alignment w/the Common Core (BrainPop & PBS LearningMedia), & one that specializes in hard-to-find educational videos (Kanopy Streaming Video).

These media resources are helpful to use while creating lesson plans for your classes and for use with students in the classroom. In addition to containing subject and topic specific videos, they are also rich in lesson planning and activity ideas, many aligned to the common core.

BrainPOP creates animated, curriculum-based content. Resources include: movies, quizzes, games, mobile apps, experiments, activity pages, and much more covering hundreds of topics within Math, Science, Social Studies, English, Technology, Arts & Music, and Health. All content is aligned to and searchable by state standards including Common Core.

PBS LearningMedia provides access to thousands of classroom-ready, curriculum-targeted digital resources. Resources are aligned to Common Core and national standards and include videos and interactives, as well as audio, documents, and in-depth lesson plans. You can browse by standards, grade level, subject area, and special collections.  You must be a SOE faculty member or student to access this resource. Please contact me if you have issues accessing the site.

Kanopy Streaming Video is an on-demand streaming video service for educational institutions that provides access to more than 26,000 films. Over 80 subject areas range from Global Studies & Languages to the Arts, to Education (K-12); Technical Training to Career Development to LGBT.

For more media resource ideas, visit the Education Lesson Planning guide, or contact the Education Librarian, Michelle Costello, directly at costello@geneseo.edu

Angela Galvan, Digital Resources & Systems Librarian

AngelaPerhaps you’ve noticed a new face or two here in Milne Library? As of September 10th, Angela Galvan is our new Digital Resources & Systems Librarian. She will be working in the Information Technology Services (ITS) department and is the lead administrator for our discovery services, collection of digital resources and our electronic resource management systems.  Angela has an extensive background in resource sharing and ILLiad management, in addition to other systems work.  Angela comes to us from the Ohio State University Health Sciences Library in Columbus, where she was Head of Interlibrary Services and Digital Reformatting Specialist.  Prior to that, she worked for Mount Carmel Health Sciences Library, also in Columbus. She is a fellow at this year’s Digital Library Federation Forum.

So what, exactly, does a “Digital Resources & Systems Librarian” do, you ask? We asked Angela this very question and she replied, “… in essence I establish, monitor, and further integrate digital resources and systems. This requires understanding everything that happens in the library, from circulation, to IDS activity, to how people search our materials, to how they’re taught in classrooms. In a practical sense, I’ve done well when users find what they’re looking for and don’t spend as much time struggling to learn an interface.  It’s one of those jobs where, when done well, no one notices because everything runs efficiently.”

Her interests are varied and include being “something of a gamer,” writing, and crafting handmade soap. Originally from Portland, Oregon, Angela is happy to have landed here in rural Western New York with her cat, Hallie, an 8-year-old domestic shorthair, and a rescue.

Hallie.bestcatever

She holds an MLIS from Kent State University, where she researched digital memorials and the impact of technology on bereavement. This area of study came about after a friend passed away suddenly and Angela found herself in a curious intersection of personal and professional demands; dealing with thanatosensitive materials. The concept of “thanatosensitivity ” is used to describe an approach that actively integrates the facts of mortality, dying, and death into HCI (human-computer interaction) research and design. She presented on the topic at Code4Lib Midwest and recommends Dying, Death, and Mortality: Towards Thanatosensitivity in HCI as one of the better papers on thanatosensitive information management.

Brandon West, Our New Social Science Librarian

BWestMilne Library is excited to welcome Brandon West as our new Social Sciences Reference & Instruction Librarian. Brandon joins us from SUNY Oswego where he was the Online Instruction/Instructional Design Librarian. In addition to teaching information literacy classes he used his extensive knowledge of online teaching and learning, instructional design and pedagogy to help faculty and staff develop and deliver both in-person and online courses.

Here at Geneseo, Brandon will be the liaison to the Anthropology, Psychology, Sociology, and Political Science Departments, and will work closely with faculty, students, and staff to help them with their information literacy, research, and collection development needs.

Prior to working in an academic environment, Brandon worked at the Grand Rapids Public Library in Grand Rapids, MI; he is also a former elementary school teacher, having been a fourth grade teacher in Charleston, SC.

Brandon received his B.A. at Grand Valley State University in English and Elementary Education, his M.Ed. from Grand Valley State University in Educational Technology, and his M.L.S. from Texas Woman’s University. As a life-long learner, he is currently pursuing a Certificate of Graduate Study in Online Learning and Teaching from the University at Albany.

In Brandon’s spare time he is the member of many national library committees and teams, such as the ACRL Instruction Session Teaching Methods Committee, the ALA GLBT Round Table, and he co-chairs the ACRL Distance Learning Section Awards Committee. In his spare, spare time he enjoys traveling, taste testing new restaurants, and parenting his two cat children.

Center for Academic Excellence – Fall 2014 Updates

CAEBlogOn behalf of everyone working with the Center for Academic Excellence, welcome back to campus everyone! And for those of you who are new, we look forward to meeting and serving you over the course of the next several years!

The C.A.E. is slated to  resume services on September 8th. As in years past, we will be hosting the Writing Learning Center, AOP tutoring, International Student & Scholar Services tutoring, and other educational services.

In addition to these services, the C.A.E. will also be sponsoring an expanded number of workshops this year, including:

  • Library instruction for transfer students
  • Library instruction for international students
  • Time management
  • Resource evaluation
  • Annotated bibliographies…

…and many more. You’ll be hearing more about our workshop offerings, including dates and times, very shortly.

Also, save the date! The C.A.E. Open House will be returning to the main floor of the Milne Library on September 24th from 4:00pm to 6:00pm. We’ll be sharing information about various tutoring and learning centers, and recognizing all the hard work done by your peer tutors across campus.

Stay tuned for more information in the coming weeks!