New Open SUNY Textbook Release: A Concise Introduction to Logic

Open SUNY Textbooks announces the release of its latest project, A Concise Introduction to Logic. Author Craig DeLancey is Professor of Philosophy and Chair of the Department of Philosophy at SUNY Oswego. View and download the text here for free.

The textbook is an “introduction to formal logic suitable for undergraduates taking a general education course in logic or critical thinking, and is accessible and useful to any interested in gaining a basic understanding of logic.  This text takes the unique approach of teaching logic through intellectual history; the author uses examples from important and celebrated arguments in philosophy to illustrate logical principles.”

About Open SUNY Textbooks

The mission of Open SUNY Textbooks is to provide an academic-friendly publishing model and infrastructure which supports faculty adoption, remixing, and creation of open educational resources (OER) and courses. We are dedicated to improving student learning outcomes and addressing the affordability of course materials.

Open SUNY Textbooks is an open access textbook publishing initiative established by State University of New York libraries and supported by SUNY Innovative Instruction Technology Grants. This pilot initiative publishes high-quality, cost-effective course resources by engaging faculty as authors and peer-reviewers, and libraries as publishing service and infrastructure.

The pilot launched in 2012, providing an editorial framework and service to authors, students and faculty, and establishing a community of practice among libraries. The first pilot is publishing 15 titles, with a second pilot to follow that will add more textbooks and participating libraries.

Participating libraries in the 2012-2013 pilot include SUNY Geneseo, College at Brockport, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, SUNY Fredonia, Upstate Medical University, and University at Buffalo, with support from other SUNY libraries and SUNY Press. The 2013-2014 pilot will add more titles, and includes new participating libraries; SUNY Oswego, Monroe Community College, and more soon.

Bob Dylan’s Career as a Blakean Visionary and Romantic

dylan-stelzigIn 2013, Milne Library published an essay by SUNY Geneseo Professor Emeritus Eugene Stelzig titled Bob Dylan’s Career as a Blakean Visionary and Romantic.”

Upon the occasion of Dylan’s being awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in literature, this might well be worth another look. Free PDF and ePub versions are available, and you can buy a print version from Amazon.com.

“Bob Dylan’s Career as a Blakean Visionary and Romantic” was completed in 1976 as an invited contribution to a volume of academic and scholarly essays on Dylan to be published by the Popular Press and edited by Patrick Morrow. After the volume was accepted and the publication contract was signed, the Popular Press reneged on the agreement, apparently because it felt the volume would fall between the cracks: Dylan’s popular fan base would not be interested in a book of academic articles, and academics would not be interested in a pop culture idol. Obviously things have changed considerably in the intervening decades!

This discussion—written almost four decades ago—of the deep affinities between Dylan’s song poetry and the Romantics, especially William Blake, is one of the early “scholarly” as opposed to popular appreciations of Dylan’s art and his oeuvre from his first album up to and including Desire (1976).

According to Stelzig,

“The piece has led a sort of underground life for decades in the wake of Robert Shelton listing it in the bibliography of his biography of Dylan, so I’m delighted that Milne Library is making it available and easily accessible to anyone.”

We previously announced this publication in the Open Access resources via SUNY Open Textbooks.

 

 

Get Reviewing!

SUNY Geneseo is can’t-turn-the-pages-fast-enough-excited to launch NaRMo: National Book Review Month – one day into February and already many have heeded the call to @getreviewing!
NaRMoLytton Smith, a faculty member in the English Department here at SUNY Geneseo, has participated in National Novel Writing Months and National Poetry Writing Months, and is thrilled to see the products of such intensive generative cycles.

But where, he asks, is the space to review all this great contemporary writing?

We’re constantly hearing, for example, about the “death” of poetry, or of experimental writing, or the short-story, or books themselves. As Chrissy Montelli, writing on the Gandy Dancer blog (the SUNY system’s literary magazine) put it: “if you have to keep declaring, over and over, that poetry is dead, it can’t actually be dead.” The reason for repeated attempts to cremate the literary arts often boils down to lack of awareness: the writers of such articles haven’t found the scintillating contemporary writing that would convince them to put down pen, shrug off  misanthropy, and settle down to read some amazing writing, about which they could then write.

That amazing writing is out there, and NaRMo will provide readers with ways to find it, and reviewers with an excuse to shout it from the virtual rooftops.

NaRMo is a grass-roots organization, based at SUNY Geneseo, and dedicated to increasing the number of book reviews of writers from all styles and backgrounds during the month of February. A collaboration between SUNY Geneseo’s English Department and Milne Library, NaRMo intends to link readers through book reviews and to help initiate conversation about books from an assortment of genres including children’s books, drama, non-fiction, fiction and poetry. This is the first year NaRMo is up and running, and we encourage everyone to get reading and get reviewing! Whether it’s through the official NaRMo site, via a literary journal, or on an online store: post a review of a recent book you want the world to know about.

Please join in, whether on the NaRMo websiteTwitterFacebook, or in whatever part of the internet or the physical world makes sense to you: reviews on online retailers, notecards in people’s mailboxes, letters to friends.

 

 

Writing in College: From Competence to Excellence [an Open SUNY Textbook]

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Writing in College: From Competence to Excellence By Amy Guptill, with contributions by Aly Button, Peter Farrell, Kaethe Leonard, and Timothée Pizarro.

Please join me in congratulating Amy Guptill on her publication of Writing in College: From Competence to Excellence, the newest Open SUNY Textbook!

Many high school students have mastered writing conventions but still struggle to understand and meet the expectations at the college level. Other students, perhaps out of school for a number of years, are getting reacquainted with academic writing while working to meet college-level challenges. Writing in College demystifies college-level expectations, helping students see the purpose behind the varied writing assignments they face.

Guptill skillfully positions specific and applicable advice about college writing within the larger framework of transitioning to the culture of the academy and college-level expectations. In addition, chapters can be read independently and assigned separately, and each is accompanied by further resources, suggested exercises, and advice from other student writers.

Writing in College: From Competence to Excellence

 Available as ebook and PDF downloads, as well as online, at: textbooks.opensuny.org/writing-in-college-from-competence-to-excellence/

 

About the Textbook

Writing in College: From Competence to Excellence is designed for students who have largely mastered the conventions of high-school level writing and are now rising to meet more the advanced expectations of college. Students will find in Writing in College a warm invitation to think of themselves as full, self-motivated members of the academic community. With concise explanations, clear multi-disciplinary examples and empathy for the challenges of student life, this short textbook both explains the purposes behind college-level writing and offers indispensable advice for organization and expression.

 

About the Author

Amy Guptill is an Associate Professor of Sociology at The College at Brockport, SUNY where she has a joint appointment with the Delta College Program, an alternative interdisciplinary General Education option. Her research focuses on spatial and structural shifts in agriculture and food systems with recent work on innovative agricultural marketing. She teaches courses in the sociology of food, development and globalization, community and social change, social statistics and college writing. In addition to Writing In College: From Competence to Excellence, she is the coauthor of a recent college textbook entitled Food & Society: Principles and Paradoxes (Malden, MA: Polity, 2012).

 

Value of Open Access Textbooks

The author is thrilled to offer this book as an open textbook. The cost of commercial textbooks is an urgent and growing problem, and all students should have easy access to advice about how to get the most out of the hundreds of pages of writing they’ll do over the course of a four-year degree.

Licensed for reuse and remix, the Open SUNY Textbooks are a valuable addition to the open access textbook community. Freely available, the open access content is peer reviewed by fellow instructors and scholars for quality and then copy-edited before publication. Open textbooks are just one component of the open educational resources movement (OER) and provide high quality, reusable material for course instructors to create cost savings for students and institutions.

 

About Open SUNY Textbooks

The SUNY Textbook program is a creative means to improving access to educational materials while fostering a community of resources that spans disciplines and encourages interdisciplinary study. SUNY Libraries and faculty are leading SUNY’s open textbook publishing initiative and have already saved thousands of dollars for SUNY students. Having published 12 free online textbooks, with 14 more planned in the next 18 months, this innovative multi-institutional program is lowering the cost of textbooks for students in New York and beyond.

Open textbooks are available to everyone free of charge. Over 50,000 downloads of Open SUNY Textbooks occurred between February 1, 2015-December 14, 2015, with visitors and readers from all over the world. For program details, please visit http://textbooks.opensuny.org

Presenting … Allison Brown, Milne’s Digital Publishing Services Manager

BrownAIt’s official — Allison Brown is Milne library’s new Digital Publishing Services Manager.  Allison was the successful candidate in last summer’s nationwide search to fill the newly-created position, bringing with her a proven track record of working with authors, navigating the publishing landscape, and producing a variety of publications.

Before you scratch your head too vigorously, wondering “But hasn’t Allison been here, doing that, long before this past summer?” — yes, she had been functioning as the digital publishing coordinator here in a temporary capacity for several years, and was instrumental in helping Milne build its publishing services from the ground up. The early projects, going back to 2012, include the Genesee Valley Historical Reprints Series (33 titles); Stuart Symington’s memoir, Tagging Along; and the first Proceedings of GREAT Day.

OpenSUNYTextbooksSince then, Allison has continued to produce more from Milne’s “press,” working closely with student groups, faculty, and emeriti at Geneseo and throughout SUNY. Among the current and ongoing projects she’s involved in is Open SUNY Textbooks,  for which she is project manager — working closely with authors and coordinating peer review, editing, and GDProceedingspublishing. She also continues to assist with production of the Proceedings of GREAT Day as well as advise for and coordinate publication of Gandy Dancer, the Geneseo-based, SUNY-wide student literary magazine edited by SUNY Geneseo students. With Gandy Dancer, Allison works closely with English professor Rachel Hall’s Editing & Production Workshop classes, both in and out of the classroom.

As Digital Publishing Services Manager, Allison manages to offer both publication assistance (production, project management, software training, etc.) to authors and experiential learning to the interns with whom she regularly works. She expects both areas to grow as more authors explore alternative publishing options, including open access (OA) publications and digital projects, and more students seek help with producing and managing their publications.

Allison earned a B.A. in English from Houghton College and an M.F.A. in creative writing from Emerson College in Boston. Prior to coming to Milne Library, she worked at Boston College’s library as a circulation desk assistant. Allison is an avid consumer of audio books since, she says, she seems to spend a lot of time in her car (much of it driving between her home in Rochester and work in Geneseo), and listening is a good way to use that time.

You can find Allison in her office (Milne 108) on the Library’s lower level, or contact her at browna@geneseo.edu or 585-245-6020.

Aaaand…. ACTION!

2015.ActionThe day has arrived! Be on the lookout around campus for our teams who have 24 hours to write, shoot, edit, and post a 3-minute video using a set of elements provided on the GIFF website.  Follow @GeneseoInsomnia on Twitter for the latest news or check out the Facebook page.

Teams are competing for prizes against other SUNY Geneseo students in an attempt to create the most witty, interesting, and creative video. This is a chance for students of all talents to flex their creative muscles and demonstrate their skills, whether they be writers, actors, videographers, or editors. Submissions are judged blindly by a panel of Geneseo faculty and staff. Videos will be shown during a special  award event at the conclusion of GREAT Day, April 21, 2015, at 6:30 pm.

Get Your Teams Together!

2015.RegistrationClosingClose of registration for the 2015 Geneseo Insomnia Film Festival is getting close. Don’t miss out on all the fun! Get your team together and register onthe Geneseo Insomnia Film Fest website.  Once you’re signed on, start planning for Friday, March 27th, when SUNY Geneseo students will compete to create the best 3 minute video, within a 24 hour window.  That’s right! You’ll write, shoot, edit, and post in a single day.

All videos will be shown and awards presented on the evening of GREAT Day (April 21st). Insomniacs are encouraged to invite friends and family over the age of 18.

Remember, you must be registered no later than March 18th to participate. Get more info and check out last year’s winning videos on their Facebook page for updates!

Teams ready? FILM!!

2015.RegistrationRegistration in now open for the 2015 Geneseo Insomnia Film Festival. On Friday, March 27th, SUNY Geneseo students will compete to create the best 3 minute video, within a 24 hour window.  That’s right! You’ll write, shoot, edit, and post in a single day.

All videos will be shown and awards presented on the evening of GREAT Day (April 21st). Insomniacs are encouraged to invite friends and family over the age of 18.

Remember, you must be registered no later than March 18th to participate. Get more info and check out last year’s winning videos on the Geneseo Insomnia Film Fest website. Oh, and follow their Facebook page for updates!