Get Graphic: Bringing Literature to Reluctant Readers

Using graphic novels in the classroom is a great way to bridge what students already know with what they have yet to learn. Graphic novels are multimodal and help facilitate and support students’ ability to visualize and understand complicated ideas. In addition to being manageable for students to read, they are relevant, engaging, and approachable. Milne Library has recently acquired a large collection of graphic novels in a variety of subjects, topics, and reading levels. For help finding graphic novels, visit the reference desk or contact the Education & Instructional Design librarian, Michelle Costello.

A sampling of graphic novels found in Milne Library:

Coral Reefs: Cities of the Ocean
by Maris Wicks.

juv 741.5 WIC

A look at ocean science covering the biology of coral reefs as well as their ecological importance.

Flying Couch: A Graphic Memoir
by Amy Kurzweil
juv 741.5 KUR

Flying couch tells the stories of three unforgettable women. Amy Kurzweil weaves her own coming-of-age as a young Jewish artist into the narrative of her mother, a psychologist, and Bubbe, her grandmother, a World War II survivor who escaped from the Warsaw Ghetto by disguising herself as a gentile. The voices and histories of these wise, hilarious, and very different women create a portrait not only of what it means to be part of a family, but also of how each generation bears the imprint of the past.

Frazzled: Everyday Disasters and Impending Doom
by Booki Vivat
juv F VIV

Nervous about middle school because her family does not get her and her friends know exactly what they want to do, Abbie Wu searches for her own passion before discovering a knack for leadership when injustices in the cafeteria come to light.

Such a Lovely Little War: Saigon, 1961-63 by Marcelino Truong ; translated by David Homel
ya 741.5 TRU

A memoir, in graphic novel form, on the early years of the Vietnam war through the eyes of a young Vietnamese boy.

The Maid of the Mist
by Tanya Anderson
juv 741.5 AND

In graphic novel format, retells the Native American legend about a young woman living along the Niagara River near its waterfalls who is transformed into a Thunder Being.

Sidewalk Flowers
by JonArno Lawson
juv P LAW

A little girl collects wildflowers while on a walk with her distracted father. Each flower becomes a gift, and whether the gift is noticed or ignored, both giver and recipient are transformed by their encounter.

Space Dumplins
by Craig Thompson
juv 741.5 THO

For Violet Marlocke, family is the most important thing in the whole galaxy. So when her father goes missing while on a hazardous job, she can’t just sit around and do nothing. To get him back, Violet throws caution to the stars and sets out with a group of misfit friends on a quest to find him. But space is big and dangerous, and she soon discovers that her dad has been swallowed by a giant, planet-eating whale. With her father’s life on the line, nothing is going to stop Violet from trying to rescue him and keep her family together.

El Deafo
by Cece Bell
juv 741.5 BEL

In this graphic novel memoir, author/illustrator Cece Bell chronicles her hearing loss at a young age and her subsequent experiences with the Phonic Ear, a very powerful–and very awkward–hearing aid. The Phonic Ear gives Cece the ability to hear–sometimes things she shouldn’t–but also isolates her from her classmates. She really just wants to fit in and find a true friend, someone who appreciates her as she is. After some trouble, she is finally able to harness the power of the Phonic Ear and become “El Deafo, Listener for All.” And more importantly, declare a place for herself in the world and find the friend she’s longed for.

Sisters
by Raina Telgemeier
juv 741.5 TEL

Three weeks.

Two sisters.

One car.

A true story.


Tippy and the Night Parade: A Toon Book

by Lilli Carré
juv 741.5 CAR

Follow Tippy on a nocturnal adventure through mist, up a mountain, down a hole and back home.

Igniting a passion for STEM with rich and engaging resources

STEM

Image credit: FlickrUser natàlia i xavier de Lu2

Are you interested in learning more about STEM activities and resources. Would you like to explore ways to incorporate STEM across the curriculum with the goal of building student understanding?

Connecting hands-on STEM activities with books, games or manipulatives can be a great way to strengthen understanding and literacy skills while inspiring inquiry and creativity.

Milne Library has recently acquired a collection of STEM books, games, and manipulatives. These high quality resources illustrate activities that encourage scientific and artistic creativity and help increase student learning.

A few items found in the collection include:

Books
Getting the most out of makerspaces to create with 3-D printers by Nicki Peter Petrikowski
High-tech DIY projects with 3D printing by Maggie Murphy
Lego awesome ideas by Daniel Lipkowitz
STEM to story: enthralling and effective lesson plans for grades 5-8 by Jennifer Traig

Manipulatives
Hands-on soft geometric solids
Molymod organic teacher set
Lego Education. Duplo: Animal bingo kit
STEM: simple machines STEM activity set

Games
Ion: a compound building game by John J. Coveyou
Prime climb: the beautiful, colorful, mathematical game
Pandemic by Matt Leacock

To learn more about STEM resources contact the Education Librarian, Michelle Costello ([email protected]).

In addition, read the following Education Update article by ASCD, “Teaching and Learning Resources for STEM Education.”

Lesson Plans: Resources to Engage Students and Enhance Learning

MichellePostIt can be difficult to find the right website to use in lesson planning, specifically one that contains videos, activities, games or other engaging material. I am highlighting three that stand out: two because of their high-quality content & their alignment w/the Common Core (BrainPop & PBS LearningMedia), & one that specializes in hard-to-find educational videos (Kanopy Streaming Video).

These media resources are helpful to use while creating lesson plans for your classes and for use with students in the classroom. In addition to containing subject and topic specific videos, they are also rich in lesson planning and activity ideas, many aligned to the common core.

BrainPOP creates animated, curriculum-based content. Resources include: movies, quizzes, games, mobile apps, experiments, activity pages, and much more covering hundreds of topics within Math, Science, Social Studies, English, Technology, Arts & Music, and Health. All content is aligned to and searchable by state standards including Common Core.

PBS LearningMedia provides access to thousands of classroom-ready, curriculum-targeted digital resources. Resources are aligned to Common Core and national standards and include videos and interactives, as well as audio, documents, and in-depth lesson plans. You can browse by standards, grade level, subject area, and special collections.  You must be a SOE faculty member or student to access this resource. Please contact me if you have issues accessing the site.

Kanopy Streaming Video is an on-demand streaming video service for educational institutions that provides access to more than 26,000 films. Over 80 subject areas range from Global Studies & Languages to the Arts, to Education (K-12); Technical Training to Career Development to LGBT.

For more media resource ideas, visit the Education Lesson Planning guide, or contact the Education Librarian, Michelle Costello, directly at [email protected]

Why use Primary Sources?

A Primary source is material created at the time of an historical event and provides a true account of that event or time period. They are a great way to expose students to multiple perspectives on past and present events and issues.

Identifying and finding primary sources can be a challenge, however, which may dissuade students from using them in their research. The video below, designed by librarians Sue Ann Brainard and Michelle Costello, introduces the plight of the Little Rock Nine and their integration struggles through the use of primary sources, such as images, oral histories, government documents and music.

Sue Ann Brainard – [email protected]

Michelle Costello – [email protected]

LittleRock9

Milne Librarians, Published!

LILACCongratulations to Milne Librarians, Kim Hoffman and Michelle Costello on the recent publication of their article,

Davies-Hoffman, K., Alvarez, B., Costello, M., & Emerson, D. (2013). Keeping pace with information literacy instruction for the real world: When will MLS programs wake up and smell the LILACs? Communications in Information Literacy, 7 (1), 9-23.

Communications in Information Literacy is a peer-reviewed, open access journal dedicated to advancing knowledge, theory, and research in information literacy.

Conceiving and implementing LILAC (not just once, but twice! as well as inspiring several similar programs) and now publishing to advocate change in the education of future librarians; they’re making an impact! Nice work, ladies!

Curious about the Library Instruction Leadership Academy (LILAC)? You can take a look at the “greatest hits” video from the most recent series to get an idea of how it has impacted the latest group of librarians in the program. You can also learn about the first series in an earlier blog post from 2010.

And let’s not forget that in 2011, The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) selected Kim and Michelle to receive its Instruction Section (IS) Innovation award for their work in developing LILAC.

When you check out the article, also be sure to look for comments from Alyse Hennig, Geneseo-grad-turned-Librarian too!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LILAC II

In collaboration with the Rochester Regional Library Council and many, many librarian volunteers throughout the Western and Central New York State area, Milne Library is thrilled to announce the kick off of the second Library Instruction Leadership Academy (LILAC).  The first program, envisioned by Milne librarians Michelle Costello and Kim Davies-Hoffman, was offered in Spring 2010 with 11 participants – librarians who were new to classroom instruction and who desired a more effective and engaging teaching approach.

This year’s LILAC has attracted many more applicants but could only accommodate for its current 21 students.  Participants hail from Buffalo, Alfred, Rochester and Syracuse and the types of libraries where they work is just as diverse – the Adam Mickiewicz Library & Dramatic Circle (the oldest surviving Polish library in Buffalo, NY), the Business Career Management Center at University of Rochester’s Simon School, the Scottsville Free Public Library and SUNY’s Upstate Health Sciences Library, just to name a few.

An additional highlight to the exciting array of students is the inclusion of three recent SUNY Geneseo graduates who have gone on to pursue a Masters in Library Science – Bonnie Archer (‘07, English Literature), Maura Proctor (‘04, History, Honors Program), and Chad Taylor (‘99, Philosophy with English and Medieval Studies minors).

While serving different age groups, populations and special interests, all 21 LILAC participants have one thing in common – the desire to become better teachers.  They started on this path by attending 1) the January 24 kick-off celebration where they were able to become acquainted with the expectations of the LILAC program and meet like-minded librarians in their cohort and 2) the first two full-day workshop which took place on January 28 and February 27.

SUNY Geneseo Education professor, Dr. Brian Morgan*, led the foundational workshop for the academy which focused on pedagogical theory and how to translate that into effective teaching practice.  The intention of LILAC is that subsequent presenters will address and emulate the theory-to-practice model, as introduced by Dr. Morgan and through their own workshop delivery. *

To prepare LILAC students for their next workshop session, Teaching with Technology (March 27),  the academy planning team has immersed them in educational technology.  Pre-workshop, the students joined in a discussion around learning new technologies via Voicethread, during the session, students will choose a chat room (from a choice of three learning management system [LMS] platforms) where they will engage in creating a new learning (digital) asset, and then come together for a larger group discussion in Blackboard’s Collaborate.  The LILAC LMS, Moodle, will provide the traditional text-based discussion forum for students to reflect, share ideas and ask questions post-workshop.

LILAC will run through June 2013 with a total five full-day workshops; observations of librarians’ teaching; outside (online) reading assignments, reflections and student discussions; and a final mini-presentation that demonstrates improved teaching practice.

Already recognized nationally by the ACRL Instruction Section Innovation Award, LILAC organizers are hopeful of similar success for their participants in 2013.  We are also pleased to announce the upcoming publication, “Keeping pace with information literacy instruction for the real world: When will MLS programs wake up and smell the LILACs?” in the online, open access journal Communications in Information Literacy. The u

ltimate goal in writing this piece is to gradually transform graduate-level curriculum in Library and Information Science programs across the country.

Claud1

Ms. Jane Mannheim Claud, Geneseo ‘69

* The inclusion of a Master Instructor with expertise in pedagogical theory and practice was made possible by a generous donation from Ms. Jane Mannheim Claud, Geneseo ‘69.

What’s Your Story?

StorytellingInstitute

How would you tell this tale?                                                                                 Reemsten, K. (Artist). (2011). Pink Study [Painting], Retrieved February 5, 2013, from:http://www.kellyreemtsen.com/index2.php#/gallery1/2/

How would you tell this tale?

Join us for a series of 8 workshops to hone your storytelling skills. Everyone has a story to tell, but storytellers have a way that brings people together and helps us learn more about who we are. Good storytelling can also be a way to persuade your audience to listen to your point of view; think about a job interview, a courtroom, or classroom and you will understand what we mean!

The Geneseo Storytelling Institute will provide instruction and practice on the art of storytelling through eight hands-on workshops. Attendees will have the opportunity to showcase their craft by performing in storytelling events for the Geneseo and Rochester communities and potentially at GREAT Day.

“Our stories give shape to our inchoate, disparate, fleeting impressions of everyday life. They bring together the past and the future into the present to provide us with structures for working towards our goals…. We are primed to use stories.” (Perry, 2012).

If you’re not convinced yet of the importance of this skill, check out this recent article, “The Science of Storytelling: Why Telling a Story is the Most Powerful Way to Activate Our Brains” and see if you still feel the same after!

The Institute is open to all Geneseo students, and will be led by Dr. Sharon Peck (School of Education), Mark Sullivan (Milne Library) and Michelle Costello (Milne Library).

The first workshop will be held on February 14th from 2:30-4:00 pm, in Milne 208. For more information and to RSVP please email Michelle Costello – [email protected] by February 8th.

Thanks, Michelle

Perry, P. (2013). How to stay sane. New York: Picador.
Reemsten, K. (Artist). (2011). Pink Study [Painting], Retrieved February 5, 2013, from:http://www.kellyreemtsen.com/index2.php#/gallery1/2/

Primary Sources: Hands-on History!

Using primary sources is an excellent technique for exploring historical events or topics. Knowing what a primary source is and finding concrete examples however, can be challenging. The video below, designed by librarians Sue Ann Brainard and Michelle Costello, introduces the plight of the Little Rock Nine and their integration struggles through the use of primary sources, such as images, oral histories, government documents and music.

This video is intended to be an introduction to a set of tutorials on specific research tools and techniques used to locate and access primary sources, to be created over the next year or so.

Please feel free to contact us with ideas for content and to let us know if you are interested in designing or developing future tutorials.

Sue Ann Brainard – [email protected]

Michelle Costello – [email protected]