Local Resources: Gay Alliance of Genesee Valley

GAGV
Photo of the GAGV’s LGBTQ Resource Center’s new library.

If you are new to Western New York, you might not be privy to the city’s extensive history in the LGBTQ movement that formed what is known today as the Gay Alliance of Genesee Valley (GAGV). The GAGV has been monumental in making Rochester a safer place to live for those who do not fall into a binary with regard to sexuality or gender expression.

You may have witnessed the impact of the GAGV right here on-campus: the rainbow signs hanging by many faculty and staff’s offices indicate they have received SafeZone Training. This training serves as an educational tool to educate supportive faculty, staff, and students on LGBTQ terminology, issues, and questions.

Recently, the GAGV has opened the doors of its new LGBTQ Resource Center at 100 College Avenue in Rochester. This resource center serves an educational and safe space for LGBTQ individuals as well as their allies. The center features a library, archives, and hosts weekly social events.

  • The library contains over 10,000 fiction and nonfiction books, periodicals, and DVDs, which are all available for you to borrow. You can browse the center’s collection online via LibraryThing.
  • The archives have plenty of historical material that help document the progression of the LGBTQ movement in Rochester, including The Empty Closet, the original publication used to advance the rights of so many individuals in Western New York.
  • The resource centers hours are:
    Monday-Friday 9:00am-5:00 pm &
    Wednesdays, 6:00-8:00 pm.
    Everyone is welcome!
GAGVStaff
The volunteer staff of the GAGV Library & Archives.

If you cannot make it all the way up to Rochester, no worries! Milne Library and SUNY Geneseo have many available LGBTQ resources. You can find many books on LGBTQ topics in Milne’s collection as well as specialized LGBTQ research databases.  Aiden Cropsey, Coordinator of LGBTQ Programs and Services, along with the student-led Pride Alliance, host several events throughout the year, and even have their own floating book collection. You can also like and follow them on Facebook!

All photos and images used with permission from the Gay Alliance of Genesee Valley.

~ written by Brandon West

3 Minutes Could Save A Life ~ Guest post by SMAC

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“3 minutes could save a life”

As you walk into Milne this week, you will find a small display with a tinfoil person and a sign that says, “3 minutes could save a life.”

I know everyone is busy and headed in various directions, but take a minute to figure out why that figure is there. What do those notes say? To the average reader, they are positive notes about why people around campus are proud to be who they are, but to me, they are hope.

They are hope that a positive message will reach someone in need and that this sign will encourage someone who is struggling to take a preliminary assessment regarding his or her risk for an eating disorder.

NEDAI’ll get right to the point: eating disorders suck. They come in all forms and they do not discriminate. They are an all-consuming loud voice that takes over, forcing you to forget all else, and they are the thing that takes your loved one away for a short time, or forever. The National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA) is fighting back against the ED, using the slogan “3 minutes can save a life,” because it is important for those suffering to receive treatment as soon as possible. The slogan is a part of this years’ National Eating Disorder Awareness Week, which is February 21st-February 27th and aims to support all people impacted by eating disorders. The voice that promotes our negative body image and feeds the eating disorder will only get louder in secrecy- this display and other events during the National Eating Disorder Awareness week intend to promote self-love and encourage those who need help to reach out and get it.

Jane1
Jane Skinner.

Personally, my inspiration comes from my younger sister, who has been battling an eating disorder – and kicking butt- for about six years. She has fought endlessly and been through many periods of great recovery, but for now, it seems like a never-ending struggle for her and for those who love her. It is important to me to reach people like my sister with this campaign, to let them know that even when we don’t know what to say, we do love them and wish to support them.

The display in Milne is to raise awareness on our campus and to promote the Proud2BMe campaign, which encourages positive body image and asks people to consider why they are proud to be who they are. Our hope is to bring a more permanent awareness to campus through a newly formed student group, also named Proud 2B Me. Sisters Making A Change (SMAC) has kindly supported my efforts, funded by IRC and SA, because SMAC is an amazing group of women who know that this issue is incredibly important to me and to this campus. I hope that everyone who looks at the display will take a moment to think about its purpose. The display is partially intended as a “coming soon,” for the awareness week, but also for the SMAC, IRC, and SA sponsored event, Mirrorless Monday.

MirrorI also hope to reach people who love someone that is struggling and do not know what to do. I am not a therapist or a doctor, I cannot “cure” eating disorders, but I can advocate for those who are lost in the voice of their eating disorders, so that is what I will do. This display in Milne Library, Mirrorless Monday, and the forming Proud2BMe club will focus on speaking out against eating disorders, Proudsupporting positive body image, and discussing current legislative and media events on the topic.

On February 22nd, students should look for covered mirrors in all academic buildings and the dining hall bathrooms. Everyone is encouraged to write positive messages on the paper, which will include an explanation for what and why this is occurring, along with a note for an interest meeting to learn more about the National Eating Disorder Association and its’ Proud2BMe campaign.

~ Jane Skinner, SMAC

And while you’re in Milne, be sure to check out the coming exhibit about body image, art, fashion, yoga, and health: “Embrace Every Angle.”

 

Mirrorless

 

Grand larceny suspects…

2012 RYSAG camp

Did you know that some of your favorite librarians and professors were suspected of grand larceny this summer?  It’s true!  An exclusive art auction of valued Works Progress Administration (WPA) paintings took place in mid-July, four of the coveted objects went “missing,” and further hijinks ensued across campus. Welcome to the Rochester Young Scholars’ Academy of Geneseo (RYSAG)!

Now in its seventh year, SUNY Geneseo invited over 60 Rochester City School District (RCSD) students, from middle and high school levels, to become “college kids,” if only for two warm summertime weeks.  Milne Library (along with Fraser Study Center) served as Command Central where many classes and crime scenes occurred.  As in past summers, Milne Library offered up space, technology, camp infrastructure, teaching staff and the most suspicious of characters.  Two such individuals — among a few others outside of the library — were brought to “trial” on the final day of the academic camp, where they faced their peers and listened to the charges brought against them.  The culminating “grand jury hearing” was the highlight of two intense weeks of study and play. RCSD students investigated crime scenes surrounding various art thefts through such coursework and activities as forensic mapping, tagging and bagging of crime scene artifacts; lab work that analyzed chromatography, hair samples, and fingerprints; information gathering through biographical background research of suspects and witnesses and through critical analysis of suspect interviews; and persuasive communication delivery through public speaking, complemented by visual imagery created through technology training.

This was the second time that the RYSAG camp based its theme on Crime Scene Investigation (CSI); the first time was the inaugural camp experience in 2007.  Other themes and challenges RCSD students have been faced with include progress vs. preservation through the results of a campus-based archaeological dig; cost vs. environmental sustainability as drafts of an eco-athletic stadium were proposed; and proactive conflict management as a formidable population was due to engulf the Geneseo’s village community.

Now Reading: Geneseo Book Club’s New Selection

Join us April 8th to discuss our book and to enter our contest for a $25 Amazon gift certificate

Geneseo’s Book Club will be starting its next book (Lock and Key by Sarah Dessen) on Sunday, April 8th – this is a great time to join us if we’re interested. Come to Milne 104 (downstairs) at 7pm on April 8th to learn about what we do, get a copy of our next book, and join in the experience!!

Anyone who comes to the April 8th meeting will be entered in a drawing for a $25 Amazon gift card. At the next meeting we will discuss the first section of our new book and draw the winner of the gift card.

Email clp11@geneseo.edu and/or join us on knightlink for more information/any questions!

Languages in Peril Roundtable Discussion

Milne Library and the Anthropology Club present:

Earth Boy
Languages in Peril Photo Credit: Duncan Walker Photography

Languages in Peril: A Roundtable Discussion on the Loss of Language

Wednesday, November 16th
2:30-3:30 PM
Milne 208

There are 6,000 languages spoken on our planet and 2,500 of those are
endangered. Come hear firsthand accounts from three speakers of
endangered languages.  These languages are no longer being taught so
there is the chance they will not exist in the next hundred years.
This is a great chance to learn the challenges speakers of a dying
language face.  It’s an open forum discussion so come with questions!
Speakers: Priya Patel, Ariunzayza Damdindorj, Maria Abaya.