Category: Sociology

Black History Month: Databases and Resources for you!

February is Black History Month.  Milne Library offers databases and links to literature collections, news archives, scholarly research projects, historical archives, and much more.  Subjects include Abolitionism, the Civil Rights movement, Human Rights, Diversity, and Social Justice. Knowledge is power!

“A collection of current newspapers providing access to news from 1989-present and is cross-searchable.”
Blues, Black Vaudeville, and the Silver Screen, 1912-1930s
“This collection consists of selected correspondence, financial records, contracts, and advertising materials from the Douglass Theater in Macon, Georgia.”
“This web site focuses on the central role played by ordinary people in the Civil Rights Movement.”
Access to scholarly journals and magazines that explore cultural differences, contributions, and influences in the global community.
“Digital library of images, audio, video, documents, and a variety of primary and secondary source materials generated after the death of Michael Brown in August, 2014. This collection is maintained and evaluated by Washington University, and other St. Louis-area institutions.”
Sabin Americana, 1500-1926 (Gale)
“Based on Joseph Sabin’s landmark bibliography, this collection contains works about the Americas published throughout the world from 1500 to the early 1900’s. Included are books, pamphlets, serials and other documents that provide original accounts of exploration, trade, colonialism, slavery and abolition, the western movement, Native Americans, military actions and much more. With over 6 million pages from 29,000 works, this collection is a cornerstone in the study of the western hemisphere.”
Slavery And Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive (Gale)
“The largest and most ambitious project of its kind, this collection is devoted to the scholarly study and understanding of slavery from a multinational perspective. An unprecedented collection developed under the guidance of a board of scholars, it offers never before available research opportunities and endless teaching possibilities.”

Slavery in America and the World: History, Culture & Law
“A multitude of essential legal materials on slavery in the United States and the English-speaking world. This includes every statute passed by every colony and state on slavery, every federal statute dealing with slavery, and all reported state and federal cases on slavery.”

Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) Publications
Publications, court cases, extremist files, Intelligence Project articles, Human Rights issues.

 

As always, visit Milne Library’s A-Z Database List for your research and learning needs! Knowledge is Power!

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Faculty Bookshelf: Joanna Kirk

A continuing series of interviews with SUNY Geneseo faculty on their reading interests; today’s “Faculty Bookshelf” delves into the pursuits of Sociology and Political Science professor, Joanna Kirk.   

JKirkWhat is your philosophy on books and reading?

You are what you read. Books are food for the mind, psyche and soul, and you can’t live a full life without them. Like dishes, you won’t like them all, and you shouldn’t feel obliged to finish your plate. In fact, don’t feel obliged to start it, or perhaps nibble around the edges to please the person who has brought it your way. Revisit your favorite books: like your favorite cuisine, your favorite literature offers comfort and delight, and (books do this better than food) you always learn something new.

What is your favorite literary genre to read for pleasure?

Fiction, particularly novels exploring social, political, economic and psychological issues; and creative nonfiction, particularly historical and travel.  Oh, and when I want a laugh, sci-fi/fantasy comedy – wish I could find more writers of this genre up to par with Douglas Adams (“Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy”) and Terry Pratchett (“Disc World”).  Any suggestions, anyone?

AdamsBooks

PratchettBooks

What books are on your nightstand now?

Currently reading: Written by Herself: Autobiographies of American Women WrittenByHerself

Books currently on my bedside table (next up, in order):

Tell us about a book that changed your life:

EdibleWomanToo many books have influenced me to mention here (some of which are listed above), but the first that comes to mind as a work with an immediate and profound effect on my thoughts and behavior was Margaret Atwood’s The Edible Woman, a gift from my elder brother, who I know perceived what I was going through.  The book helped me greatly with an eating disorder, and drew me further into issues of gender stereotyping, inequality and violence.

Name a book you just couldn’t finish: Lord of the rings

There are two “classics” I never finished:

What were your favorite books as a child?

Most* memorable childhood and young adult books (all of which helped me formulate goals in terms of personal qualities, professional skills, and lifetime accomplishments):

* It would be more accurate to say that they are the ones that have come to mind over the week since I was invited – thank you, Milne Library! – to write my book-bio.LittleHouseSeries

 

What are your current research interests?

Global development policy, particularly environmental and social sustainability and justice; and women’s rights, particularly violence against women.

Many of these books are available in the Milne Library collection and the others are available via IDS, simply click on the links or book covers above to get the call number or click “Get It” to request the book via IDS.