3 Minutes Could Save A Life ~ Guest post by SMAC

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“3 minutes could save a life”

As you walk into Milne this week, you will find a small display with a tinfoil person and a sign that says, “3 minutes could save a life.”

I know everyone is busy and headed in various directions, but take a minute to figure out why that figure is there. What do those notes say? To the average reader, they are positive notes about why people around campus are proud to be who they are, but to me, they are hope.

They are hope that a positive message will reach someone in need and that this sign will encourage someone who is struggling to take a preliminary assessment regarding his or her risk for an eating disorder.

NEDAI’ll get right to the point: eating disorders suck. They come in all forms and they do not discriminate. They are an all-consuming loud voice that takes over, forcing you to forget all else, and they are the thing that takes your loved one away for a short time, or forever. The National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA) is fighting back against the ED, using the slogan “3 minutes can save a life,” because it is important for those suffering to receive treatment as soon as possible. The slogan is a part of this years’ National Eating Disorder Awareness Week, which is February 21st-February 27th and aims to support all people impacted by eating disorders. The voice that promotes our negative body image and feeds the eating disorder will only get louder in secrecy- this display and other events during the National Eating Disorder Awareness week intend to promote self-love and encourage those who need help to reach out and get it.

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Jane Skinner.

Personally, my inspiration comes from my younger sister, who has been battling an eating disorder – and kicking butt- for about six years. She has fought endlessly and been through many periods of great recovery, but for now, it seems like a never-ending struggle for her and for those who love her. It is important to me to reach people like my sister with this campaign, to let them know that even when we don’t know what to say, we do love them and wish to support them.

The display in Milne is to raise awareness on our campus and to promote the Proud2BMe campaign, which encourages positive body image and asks people to consider why they are proud to be who they are. Our hope is to bring a more permanent awareness to campus through a newly formed student group, also named Proud 2B Me. Sisters Making A Change (SMAC) has kindly supported my efforts, funded by IRC and SA, because SMAC is an amazing group of women who know that this issue is incredibly important to me and to this campus. I hope that everyone who looks at the display will take a moment to think about its purpose. The display is partially intended as a “coming soon,” for the awareness week, but also for the SMAC, IRC, and SA sponsored event, Mirrorless Monday.

MirrorI also hope to reach people who love someone that is struggling and do not know what to do. I am not a therapist or a doctor, I cannot “cure” eating disorders, but I can advocate for those who are lost in the voice of their eating disorders, so that is what I will do. This display in Milne Library, Mirrorless Monday, and the forming Proud2BMe club will focus on speaking out against eating disorders, Proudsupporting positive body image, and discussing current legislative and media events on the topic.

On February 22nd, students should look for covered mirrors in all academic buildings and the dining hall bathrooms. Everyone is encouraged to write positive messages on the paper, which will include an explanation for what and why this is occurring, along with a note for an interest meeting to learn more about the National Eating Disorder Association and its’ Proud2BMe campaign.

~ Jane Skinner, SMAC

And while you’re in Milne, be sure to check out the coming exhibit about body image, art, fashion, yoga, and health: “Embrace Every Angle.”

 

Mirrorless

 

Check it out: Hamlet curriculum guide

HamletThe Scout Report recommends this useful resource:

This Hamlet curriculum guide, assembled by the Folger Shakespeare Library, provides a substantial array of teacher resources. Here educators will find a synopsis of the play, an overview of the characters in graphic form, tips for teaching Shakespeare, a series of helpful frequently asked questions about teaching the Bard, two full Lesson Plans with handouts, and a page of short quotes from the play. The lesson plans, especially, provide a creative take on the classic text. One investigates Hamlet’s central dilemmas (the death of his father, the remarriage of his mother, and his inability to act). The second uses music to explore Shakespeare’s characters. [CNH]

Presenting … Allison Brown, Milne’s Digital Publishing Services Manager

BrownAIt’s official — Allison Brown is Milne library’s new Digital Publishing Services Manager.  Allison was the successful candidate in last summer’s nationwide search to fill the newly-created position, bringing with her a proven track record of working with authors, navigating the publishing landscape, and producing a variety of publications.

Before you scratch your head too vigorously, wondering “But hasn’t Allison been here, doing that, long before this past summer?” — yes, she had been functioning as the digital publishing coordinator here in a temporary capacity for several years, and was instrumental in helping Milne build its publishing services from the ground up. The early projects, going back to 2012, include the Genesee Valley Historical Reprints Series (33 titles); Stuart Symington’s memoir, Tagging Along; and the first Proceedings of GREAT Day.

OpenSUNYTextbooksSince then, Allison has continued to produce more from Milne’s “press,” working closely with student groups, faculty, and emeriti at Geneseo and throughout SUNY. Among the current and ongoing projects she’s involved in is Open SUNY Textbooks,  for which she is project manager — working closely with authors and coordinating peer review, editing, and GDProceedingspublishing. She also continues to assist with production of the Proceedings of GREAT Day as well as advise for and coordinate publication of Gandy Dancer, the Geneseo-based, SUNY-wide student literary magazine edited by SUNY Geneseo students. With Gandy Dancer, Allison works closely with English professor Rachel Hall’s Editing & Production Workshop classes, both in and out of the classroom.

As Digital Publishing Services Manager, Allison manages to offer both publication assistance (production, project management, software training, etc.) to authors and experiential learning to the interns with whom she regularly works. She expects both areas to grow as more authors explore alternative publishing options, including open access (OA) publications and digital projects, and more students seek help with producing and managing their publications.

Allison earned a B.A. in English from Houghton College and an M.F.A. in creative writing from Emerson College in Boston. Prior to coming to Milne Library, she worked at Boston College’s library as a circulation desk assistant. Allison is an avid consumer of audio books since, she says, she seems to spend a lot of time in her car (much of it driving between her home in Rochester and work in Geneseo), and listening is a good way to use that time.

You can find Allison in her office (Milne 108) on the Library’s lower level, or contact her at [email protected] or 585-245-6020.

Celebrating Geneseo Authors

2015.GeneseoAuthorsCome and celebrate all the recent publications of SUNY Geneseo faculty, staff, and students!

Wednesday, November 18, 2015 4:00-5:00pm

Milne Library,  Room 213

Please join us for light refreshments and the chance to chat with colleagues about your recent publications.

 

First Plagiarism Workshops of the Semester

PlagiarismpicDates
Students plagiarize for many reasons, including procrastination, panic, and lack of understanding about how to paraphrase, quote, and cite properly. In this workshop taught by librarians, students will discuss plagiarism scenarios, understand the importance of using original ideas and language, and learn how to incorporate paraphrases and quotes into their writing.
Instructor: Librarians Milne Library

Wednesday, September 9, 3:30 – 4:20 pm in Milne 104

OR

Thursday, September 10, 6:00 – 6:50 pm in Milne 104
[Register for Ruby Certificate Credit]

Government Documents Are Moving Back to Milne

GDocsCollectionThis summer, the library is moving our government documents back to Milne in preparation for building renovations in Fraser. The loss of the space in Fraser gave us opportunity to work with faculty across several disciplines in a re-evaluation of this collection. “We know that there just isn’t enough space to bring everything back to Milne. However, most of the material in this collection is available online. In fact, over 95% of materials currently published by the Government Printing Office are freely available in full-text online,” said Justina Elmore, Coordinator of the Government Documents Collection. “We spent last semester working with faculty to determine what and how much of this collection we could, and have room to, retain.”

Now that the size of the collection has been reduced to just the government documents that our patrons actually use, the library has begun the process of moving them back to Milne. Additionally, Milne Library will continue to offer quick delivery via IDS for any deselected items that are not yet online, should the need arise. Luckily, there are two Federal Depository libraries in the area from which to draw.

Bringing these materials back to Milne will make finding and using government documents easier. Most of the material will become part of the general collection, allowing us to reduce the number of places a researcher must look in order to find materials on a particular topic.