USGS: Estimating the Impact of Restoring Ecosystems

The United States Geological Survey (USGS) recently released a 100-page report that uses a series of case studies to analyze the potential economic impact of restoring ecosystems. As the authors note in their introduction, “It is important for restoration practitioners to be able to quantify the economic impacts of individual restoration projects in order to communicate the contribution of these activities to local and national stakeholders.” Despite this importance, according to the authors there are currently few studies that compare short and long term economic benefits by considering multiple projects.

This study examines 21 Department of Interior (DOI) projects, including projects that are part of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration (NRDA) program. The authors then identify and evaluate the economic impact of these projects using a variety of factors, including labor income generated by the project and “value added” in goods and services. Check out the full report here. [MMB]

This review originally published in The Internet Scout.

Need a place to work on creative projects? Imagine this!!

Welcome to the Imaginarium!!

We are Megan and Emily, second year students in the Childhood and Special Education program at SUNY Geneseo. We are your Imaginarium curators for the Spring 2017 semester and are always willing to help with your creative needs when it comes to projects! Here in the Imaginarium, there are lots of resources for your use. We have over 100 die cut stencils, three die-cut machines, a paper cutter and LOTS of space for project creations. The Imaginarium has limited resources this semester, but you’re welcome to use what we have to offer!

Everyone can use this space!

The Teacher Education Resource Center (TERC) space and the Imaginarium is available for everyone’s use. Located in Milne Library on the lower level, the TERC area and the Imaginarium have lots of resources to offer. TERC includes fiction and nonfiction books for all grade levels, puppets, videos, and other materials for teachers’ lessons. We encourage that students take advantage of these materials.

Our office hours are:

Monday 2:30-3:45
Wednesday 6:30-7:45

BOTH the TERC and Imaginarium are open during all library hours. If you have any question, concerns, or suggestions you can email the Imaginarium curators at [email protected] or [email protected].

GoConqr

goconqrPerhaps you’re looking for tools to help you study and prepare for exams? GoConqr (formerly known as Exam Time) is a learning and networking tool for students and educators. GoConqr allows users to make flashcards, mindmaps, quizzes, notes, and slides to review concepts. Users can then choose to keep these resources private for their own use (or for their class’s use), or opt to share these resources to the larger GoConqr community.

By sharing resources, other CoConqr users can search and use these resources for their own purposes. GoConqr is designed to help users prepare for standardized tests (such as the SAT, ACT, and GRE) or to study subject-specific facts and content. This web-based tool is also available as a free application for iOS and android devices. [MMB]

This review originally published in The Internet Scout.

History Unfolded: U.S. Newspapers and the Holocaust

historyunfoldedIn the 1930s, what could the average American citizen learn about the Nazi persecution of Jewish individuals and other minorities from reading American newspapers? How did the U.S. press report on these atrocities? How did American domestic politics, social movements, and prejudices influence press coverage? The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum has launched the History Unfolded project to facilitate exploration and conversation around these important questions.

The museum has invited researchers and students across the United States to collect and digitize U.S. newspaper articles to include in the museum’s growing online database. In Spring 2018, these archives will be incorporated into an exhibition about Americans and the Holocaust. Meanwhile, visitors to this website can learn how to participate in the project or browse through the articles currently in the database. There are a number of Teacher Resources here, including a detailed lesson plan and links to online newspaper databases that will help history instructors facilitate classroom research projects. [MMB]

You’ll also find useful tutorials on “How to Read Newspapers from the 1930’s and 1940’s” and “How to Use Microfilm.” While those of us of a certain (ahem) vintage may find it astonishing that these concepts need to be explained, the fact is that the newest generations among us haven’t had to get their information in these formats and their organization can be baffling for those uninitiated.

This review originally published in The Internet Scout.