Walter Harding’s Life of Scholarship on Exhibit in Milne’s Lobby

hardingcomm002Milne Library invites you to view an exhibit dedicated to one of SUNY Geneseo’s most distinguished and influential professors, Dr. Walter Harding.  Harding, one of the world’s leading Thoreau scholars, was a member of the English Dept. faculty from 1956 to 1983 and in that time served as chairman of both the English department and the Division of Humanities.

The impact of Harding’s world-class scholarship and passion for Henry David Thoreau reached far beyond Geneseo, from campuses and auditoriums across the nation to Asia and Europe, where the U.S. State Dept. sent him to deliver a series of lectures on Thoreau and American literature. And, of course, the hundreds of articles and books he wrote or edited continue to enlighten and influence the world of Thoreau studies.

hardingcomm017The exhibit, located in Milne’s lobby, coincides with the annual Walter Harding Lecture to be delivered on Tuesday, Nov. 8 at 7:30 p.m. in the Doty Recital Hall. This year’s speaker is Elizabeth Witherell, editor-in-chief of The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau (aka the Thoreau Edition).  Walter Harding himself was the first editor-in-chief, from 1966 to 1972, of this monumental scholarly project. The exhibit will be on view through the end of the semester.

Fair Use? Your Rights as a User and Creator of Digital Content

Can you be sued for using an image you found online? Is writing fan fiction legal? When you get inspired by something you read online and create something new from it, do you own it? After discussing scenarios, attendees will appreciate the fine line between fair use and copyright infringement, and will recognize the difference between student and professional behavior.
Instructor: Sue Ann Brainard – Library Faculty, Milne Library

Thursday, November 10th
1:00 – 2:00 pm
Milne 208

[Register for Ruby Certificate Credit] *Required Workshop

From Agonized to Organized: Tips to Better Manage Files & Folders

agonizedorganizedPlease bring a laptop to the workshop!

This session provides a brief introduction to best practices for data management for undergraduate students in any discipline. Students will learn about basic data management concepts by working with data and files they already have. Discover useful tips for naming, organizing and preserving your files, photos and other digital content.
Instructor: Bonnie Swoger – Library Faculty, Milne Library

Thursday, November 10th
1:00 – 2:00 pm
MacVittie College Union
Room 322/323

[Register for Ruby Certificate Credit]  *Required Workshop

FINAL Plagiarism Workshop of 2016!

plagiarismfinal-8by6Students plagiarize for many reasons. While some are simply trying to get through a course as easily as possible, others procrastinate and panic, taking a few short cuts to get the assignment done. Some students think that text on a “group-developed” web page like Wikipedia does not have to be cited because it is “common knowledge” (not true!).  Others genuinely do not understand how to paraphrase, quote, and cite properly.

In this workshop taught by librarians, students will:

  1. discuss how copyright laws and plagiarism rules apply to using material from the web
  2. learn how citing correctly can help avoid unintentional plagiarism
  3. learn how to write a paragraph that successfully and clearly distinguishes paraphrases and quotes from original ideas and language

See the website for a complete list of dates the workshop is offered.

Falling Back – Set Those Clocks!

daylightsavingsDaylight Saving Time Ends on Sunday and our clocks will need to be set back 1 hour.

Daylight-savings time is the advancing of the clock, usually in summer time, one hour ahead of the local standard time in order to increase the hours of daylight available at the end of the day.

DaylightSavFUN FACT¹: In the 1950s and 1960s, after World War II, there was no national law about daylight saving time. So any city or town could decide to have daylight saving time, and also could decide on its own when to start it and when to end it. So as daylightsaving time became popular, you had the situation where one town wouldn’t have daylight saving time; the neighboring town would have daylight saving time. And the third neighboring town might have daylight saving time, but starting and ending at different dates than the second town. And one of the interesting things that happened at that time is there was a bus ride you could take on Route 2 from Moundsville, West Virginia, to Steubenville, Ohio.

And the bus ride was only 35 miles but because of some towns along the way had daylight saving time and some didn’t, if you wanted to keep your watch correct during that 35-mile ride, would have to change the watch seven times.

1. The story of daylight saving time (2009). . Washington, D.C.: NPR. Retrieved from https://proxy.geneseo.edu/login?url=http://proxy.geneseo.edu:2091/docview/189972197?accountid=11072

GOLD: Introduction to Video Creation

GOLD.VideoCreationPlease bring a laptop to the workshop!

There is much more involved in creating a quality video than having a shiny camera and knowing what buttons to push in your video editing software. Video editing is a craft that if not pursued with a level of efficiency can become time consuming and frustrating, when it should be enjoyable and rewarding. The purpose of this session will be to provide GOLD students with an introduction to many of the facets involved in capturing, editing, and exporting video. At the end of your time in this session you will have a basic familiarity with the workflow, challenges, and skills necessary to complete a quality video project.
Instructor: Joe Dolce – Computing Information and Technology

Thursday, November 3rd
1:00 – 2:00 pm
GOLD Leadership Center,
MacVittie College Union, Room 114

[Register for Ruby Certificate Credit]

Final Three Plagiarism Workshops…

3.Nov1.3Students plagiarize for many reasons. While some are simply trying to get through a course as easily as possible, others procrastinate and panic, taking a few short cuts to get the assignment done. Some students think that text on a “group-developed” web page like Wikipedia does not have to be cited because it is “common knowledge” (not true!).  Others genuinely do not understand how to paraphrase, quote, and cite properly.

In this workshop taught by librarians, students will:

  1. discuss how copyright laws and plagiarism rules apply to using material from the web
  2. learn how citing correctly can help avoid unintentional plagiarism
  3. learn how to write a paragraph that successfully and clearly distinguishes paraphrases and quotes from original ideas and language

See the website for a complete list of dates the workshop is offered.

Advanced Database Searching: Improve Your Search Results

GOLD.AdvancedSearvhingPlease bring a laptop to the workshop!

Leaders, scholars, and professionals all have one thing in common: they have complex information needs. This workshop will teach participants to leverage the power of online search tools by applying filters, citation tracking, and other techniques rarely used by casual researchers. You’ll be expert researchers after this workshop!
Instructors: Bonnie Swoger – Library Faculty, Milne Library; Sue Ann Brainard – Library Faculty, Milne Library

Tuesday, October 25th
1:00 – 2:00 pm
GOLD Leadership Center,
MacVittie College Union, Room 114

[Register for Ruby Certificate Credit]

Bob Dylan’s Career as a Blakean Visionary and Romantic

dylan-stelzigIn 2013, Milne Library published an essay by SUNY Geneseo Professor Emeritus Eugene Stelzig titled Bob Dylan’s Career as a Blakean Visionary and Romantic.”

Upon the occasion of Dylan’s being awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in literature, this might well be worth another look. Free PDF and ePub versions are available, and you can buy a print version from Amazon.com.

“Bob Dylan’s Career as a Blakean Visionary and Romantic” was completed in 1976 as an invited contribution to a volume of academic and scholarly essays on Dylan to be published by the Popular Press and edited by Patrick Morrow. After the volume was accepted and the publication contract was signed, the Popular Press reneged on the agreement, apparently because it felt the volume would fall between the cracks: Dylan’s popular fan base would not be interested in a book of academic articles, and academics would not be interested in a pop culture idol. Obviously things have changed considerably in the intervening decades!

This discussion—written almost four decades ago—of the deep affinities between Dylan’s song poetry and the Romantics, especially William Blake, is one of the early “scholarly” as opposed to popular appreciations of Dylan’s art and his oeuvre from his first album up to and including Desire (1976).

According to Stelzig,

“The piece has led a sort of underground life for decades in the wake of Robert Shelton listing it in the bibliography of his biography of Dylan, so I’m delighted that Milne Library is making it available and easily accessible to anyone.”

We previously announced this publication in the Open Access resources via SUNY Open Textbooks.

 

 

Dynamic Dialects: An Interactive Accent Database

dynamicdialectsDynamic Dialects is an interactive accent database that allows visitors to compare English dialects from around the world. The research team behind the project – who represent the University of Glasgow, Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, University College, London, and Napier University, Edinburgh – use a technique called Ultrasound Tongue Imaging (UTI) to document and analyze these dialects.

The UTI is able to record the movement of the tongue and other articulatory organs. (This site contains an extensive explanation in How UTI Works for interested visitors.) Project participants from around the world pronounced the same 28 words in a studio with a UTI. On this website visitors can listen to an audio recording of all participants via an interactive map, which allows one to explore the pronunciation of multiple words by a single speaker. Alternatively, visitors can browse the Accent Chart, which allows visitors to quickly compare the pronunciation of the same word by different speakers. [MMB]

This review originally published in The Internet Scout.