Workshop: Finding Images and Sound Clips

GOLD.SoundImageAn introduction to finding and using images, visual and audio media. We will survey Flickr, image search engines and other free image resources, as well as databases available via Milne Library.

Wednesday, March 11th
3:30 – 4:30 pm
Milne 104

Instructor: Tracy Paradis – Library Faculty

Workshop: Online Emerging Technologies for Creating Multimedia Content

OnlineEmergingThe interactive tools available on the web are becoming just as popular as many of the computer software applications installed on our computers. This workshop will look at and demonstrate some web tools that can help you deliver your content more effectively. Examples include: Prezi, Animoto, bubbl.us, Wordle, Poll Everywhere and more.

Tuesday, March 10th
2:30 – 3:30 pm
Milne 104

Instructor: Steve Dresbach – Technology Instructor, Milne Library

Daylight Saving Time begins Sunday, March 8.

springWhat is it?  Why do we do it?

Daylight-savings time (DST) is the advancing of the clock one hour ahead of the local standard time in order to increase the hours of daylight available at the end of the day.

The idea originated with none other than Benjamin Franklin in the 1700s.  But it didn’t really catch on until WWI when England and Germany put it into practice as a wartime measure for making full use of daylight hours.  By 1925, it became permanent in England.

The U.S. also took advantage of daylight savings for both World Wars, but it didn’t become a permanent fixture for most states until the oil crisis in the mid-1960′s. Now, all but two states in the U.S.(Arizona and Hawaii) observe DST.

Sources:
Summer Time. (2002). In Brewer’s Dictionary of Modern Phrase and Fable.
Worldatlas.com. (2014, Oct. 10). Daylight savings time: The exceptions. Retrieved from http://www.worldatlas.com/articles/daylight-savings-exceptions.htm

Help available for GREAT Day Projects

390x240xGREATday-blog1.jpg.pagespeed.ic.f9hBSGLeelParticipating in GREAT Day is a significant honor, but it can also be an intimidating experience.  A lot of work goes into papers, posters, and presentations, and students want their work to stand out in a good way.  But what is one supposed to do if he or she doesn’t know how to design a good poster or write a proper abstract?

The Center for Academic Excellence (CAE) has the answer!

For the second time, the CAE is working with staff and faculty across campus to bring you a series of workshops designed for first-timers and GREAT Day veterans alike.  We already have five workshops scheduled and ready to go.

So if you really want your GREAT Day project to stand out for all the right reasons, take a look at what we’re offering!

GREAT DAY WORKSHOP SERIES, SPRING 2015

Abstract Writing
Wednesday March 11th, 4:00-5:00pm, Milne 213

Unsure of how to write a proper abstract for your GREAT Day project?  This 60 minute workshop will help you through the process.  After some brief instruction, you will have the opportunity to write your GREAT Day abstract with guided help from some of SUNY Geneseo’s best writing tutors.  Taught by Gillian Paku and Writing Learning Center tutors.

Design Principles
Monday March 23rd, 5:00-6:00pm, CU 319

Graphic design is hard.  This workshop keys in on three fundamental elements of design (spacing, color, and text) to help you draft a memorable and effective GREAT Day poster.  Taught by Kristen Fuest.

Creating a Poster Using InDesign
Wednesday March 25th, 5:00-6:00pm, Milne 104

InDesign is a versatile design program you can find on pretty much every public computer on campus.  However, many SUNY Geneseo students are unfamiliar with it.  Come learn the ropes in this one-hour workshop and turn that amazing GREAT Day poster idea into a reality.  Taught by Steve Dresbach.

Creating a Poster Using PowerPoint
Thursday March 26th, 5:00-6:00pm, Milne 104

It’s not just for presentations!  When it comes to creating GREAT Day posters, PowerPoint is a friendly and familiar alternative for students who don’t necessarily want to learn a brand new program.  Taught by Steve Dresbach.

Creating a PowerPoint Presentation
Tuesday April 7th, 5:00-6:00pm, Milne 104

Just about all of us have used PowerPoint before, but despite your relative familiarity with the program, there’s probably a lot of really neat features you never knew about.  Learn how to make your GREAT Day presentation stand out with this sixty minute workshop.  Taught by Steve Dresbach.

Getting the Most From Google Scholar, or, Squirrels are Friends, not Food

SquirrelScholarEditor’s Note: This guest post was written by Geneseo alum and former Milne Library intern Margaret Craft, when she was a senior here last year. It’s always good to revisit this information!

I’m sure when you think of Google, you think of fuzzy dogs, craigs list, and the strange questions Google helpfully fills in for you, including

and the deepest most applicable question lingering at our core:

When can you eat squirrel?

…which a truly desperate college student on Geneseo’s campus might start to wonder, as the meal plan dwindles and you keep losing staring contests. (Vegans: it’s okay. Keep reading, it gets better, maybe.)

Squirrel

Day after day, eventually you start to wonder what you couldn’t eat those little buggers on. Pizza? Other squirrels?

This might require some research. For all you know, studies at Geneseo may have found a significant portion of squirrels have secret identities and should therefore be protected, not baked.

Superhero squirrel

What you, the savvy Geneseo student, would thus benefit from using is the mind-bogglingly awesome part of Google devoted to this need, sneakily hidden under products. Yes, indeed this grail of searching is none other than GOOGLE SCHOLAR, a versatile research tool that looks for your search terms in articles, patents, and book citations.

On the homepage it tries to be modest and say it only looks for articles, but it will search for books as well. Such results will appear with a [BOOK] designation at the beginning of the citation.

Once you’ve typed a search term in, such as “squirrel,” you’ll be shown a master list of all results.

Google Scholar search results

You may note that the third result on the list concerns movement representations in squirrel monkeys, which, while adorable are not a viable food source on Geneseo’s campus and thus not your concern.

To get rid of squirrel monkey results, you can exclude the word “monkey” in the advanced search. Clicking on the arrow next to the search box pulls up the advanced search functions.

Advanced search

To get rid of squirrel monkey results, you can exclude the word “monkey”:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.26.42 PM

You can further narrow results down by using the exact phrase option:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.26.34 PM

and now the top result (no superhero squirrel research in sight, sadly) based on my choice to sort by relevancy  is:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.28.08 PM

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.31.59 PMBummer. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a not so fun thing where your brain degenerates through infection by proteins called prions. Apparently it is possible to contract the disease through eating the brains of squirrels that are infected with these prions. However, when I look at more recent results by asking Google to only look for results in the last 14 years, I get this article, which is directly available for free through the link for Springer at the right:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.32.13 PM

It concludes that it is unlikely that infectious prions will appear in red squirrels. Whew. But maybe we have gray squirrels…

Underneath the citation and excerpt, you can see how many times it has been cited, none in this case, and how many websites have the full text available (All 11 versions). The link for “Related articles” at the far left will show related materials that includes others more recent than this article, these may include other types of squirrels. There is also the option to cite the article directly or save it to “my library,” which is a personalized memory bank that will keep track of citations you’re interested in.

Now the varied danger of eating squirrel brains is corroborated by another article that talks about more than just red squirrels:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.35.38 PM

It has been cited by 11 other more recent articles, which could be useful for further research into the topic. Additionally, there is no link to a free version to the right of the citation, meaning none of the 8 versions showed are available for free download. Boo.

You could cry, but wait! There should be, if you are on Geneseo’s wifi network or using an on-campus computer, a “Get It” link to the right of all articles. It may also be listed under “More” under the citation as well. This will take you to the glorious IDS request page, which should get you the article within 48 hours! REJOICE PEOPLE.

And if you are not on-campus, there is an alternative. Click “Settings” on this menu:

Google Scholar settings

What will appear is this:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.39.04 PM

Type, as I have, SUNY Geneseo and hit search.  Check the box next to “Milne Library, SUNY Geneseo – Get it”.

Now hit “Save” and you will return to your search.  Now when you look to the right of a citation, you should see the Get It next to it, or More below the citation itself.

Happy searching*!

*Just remember to research before you eat. You never know.

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.40.46 PM

*Vegans: it’s okay. Keep reading, it gets better.

 

Workshop: Organize Your Web Research With Diigo

Get digitally organized!

Get digitally organized!

No longer do you need to print web pages to highlight and take personalizes notes! Diigo is a powerful research and collaboration tool that can help you save, organize, and share what you discover on the web. Students will learn how to save, annotate, tag and share their favorite sites while creating their own personal archive. Students are required to bring laptops to this workshop.

Tuesday, March 3rd
2:30 – 3:30 pm
MacVittie College Union Hunt Room

Instructor: Tracy Paradis – Library Faculty

Workshop: Infographics 101

GOLD.INfographics

Monday, March 2nd
1:30 – 2:30 pm
Milne 104

Infographics are a great way to quickly and easily present complex information. In this session, you’ll get a brief introduction to infographics, learn a few design best practices, and discover some of the free software available for creating your own infographics.

Instructor: Justina Elmore – Reference Librarian, Milne Library

Workshop: Creating e-Portfolios for the Job Market

GOLD.ePortfolioAn e-portfolio is a means of showcasing your accomplishments in digital format. It demonstrates your skills and competencies and is a reflection of who you are. Come and learn how to create your own free e-portfolio and add various forms of digital content, such as documents, videos, presentations and photos.

Thursday, February 26th
2:30 – 3:30 pm
Milne 104

Instructor: Steve Dresbach – Technology Instructor, Milne Library

The Imaginarium: A creative Space for SOE Students

The Imaginarium is an open space located in Milne Library on the Lower Level. It is place where School of Education students have access to a wide variety of materials and resources that help them to create dynamic lessons, displays, bulletin boards, models and many more projects.

imaginarium-collageThe Imaginarium helps students connect manipulatives and other additive resources such as, games, textbooks, and videos to their lessons and assignments to create more exciting and lively projects and presentations.

The Imaginarium is also available to clubs, organizations, and the community to use along side the wide variety of materials in the TERC collection, including lots of fiction and non-fiction children books, games, and puppets.

Office hours are on Monday and Wednesday from 7pm-9pm. Please feel free to stop by with questions or help you need with upcoming projects! In addition send an email directly to the Imaginarium curator, Miranda ([email protected]) or Education Librarian, Michelle Costello ([email protected]).

Workshop: Time Management for Busy Geeks

GOLD.TimeMgmtTuesday, February 24
1:30 – 2:30 pm
Milne 104

Time management is an important skill for getting your work done, finding a satisfactory work / life balance, and keeping your sanity. CIT’s Laurie Fox will present strategies of time management and how best to apply them to our ever-changing, technology-laden lives.

Instructor: Laurie Fox – Assistant Director & Manager for Support Services, Computing and Information Technology