Open SUNY Textbooks: New Release!

OST.Instruction in Functional Assessment

Open SUNY Textbooks: New Release! Instruction in Functional Assessment by Marcie Desrochers and Moira Fallon

Instruction in Functional Assessment by Marcie Desrochers and Moira Fallon is the latest publication of Open SUNY Textbooks. Open textbooks help reduce the cost of textbooks and higher education, and Open SUNY Textbooks is an innovative program led by SUNY Libraries and Faculty.

Instruction in Functional Assessment provides students and instructors a foundational understanding of functional assessment procedures. This text includes case studies, role-plays, and assignments to support hands-on application of the material, and resources for instructors in evaluating students’ performance. Available open & free on opensuny.org as an interactive PDF and EPUB ebook.

Dr. Marcie Desrochers

Dr. Marcie Desrochers is an Associate Professor of Psychology

Dr. Marcie Desrochers is an Associate Professor of Psychology at The College at Brockport, State University of New York. Desrochers has conducted research on teaching functional assessment and evaluating the effectiveness of a computer simulation program called Simulations in Developmental Disabilities. She also has extensive experience teaching undergraduate and graduate students, and supervising students and practitioners in the field.

Dr. Moira Fallon

Dr. Moira Fallon is a Professor in the Department of Education and Human Development

Dr. Moira Fallon is a Professor in the Department of Education and Human Development at The College at Brockport, State University of New York and has over thirty years of experience in the field of special education in public schools. She holds certifications from several states in learning disabilities, behavior disabilities, early intervention, and assistive technology. Dr. Fallon has published widely in issues of inclusion and advocacy for individuals with disabilities, and has been a leader in developing learning communities, promoting school leaders for continuous improvement, and identifying research-based, supportive resources for improving professional skills.

Milne Library is proud to support this new Open Textbook! Be sure to check out the list of forthcoming titles scheduled for publication in 2015. Students, ask your professor if they will consider adopting an open textbook!

Many other organizations are also developing open textbooks. If your subject area is not covered in the Open SUNY Textbooks catalog, check out:

 

 

 

Welcome back! Here’s what’s new @ Milne!

WhatsNewAs always, we’ve made some changes around the library over the summer. Here are some highlights!

Expanded Lower Level study area

We have expanded our seating on the Lower Level along windows — including new tables that all have access to power and comfortable seating.

Based upon student feedback during last year’s study space assessment, we have incorporated different table sizes to facilitate group study and independent study.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Updated Upper Level study area

The open study area on the north side of the Upper Level is primed for new furniture and more comfortable seating. The furniture is scheduled for delivery the first week of class. We apologize for the delay and really appreciate your patience while the new furniture is installed!

We think you’ll like the changes, as these new tables will be powered during the Fall semester — providing more options for students to charge their laptops.

Expanded Tech Help services

Milne Library is partnering with CIT to expand our Tech Help services in the library. Our Tech Help students will now be CIT-trained and managed, allowing them to provide additional services in the Library, such as:

  • Setting up your mobile device on Geneseo’s network
  • Academic software installation
  • Connecting to Geneseo services
  • VPN setup
  • Virtual Lab setup

Kindle Textbooks on Reserve

We are piloting a new way of providing affordable access to textbooks. Starting this semester, we will be circulating selected textbooks on Kindle Fire HD tablets. The Kindles can be checked out for 4 hours and include the following textbooks:

New netbooks & more graphing calculators available

We are now circulating 10 new netbooks. These are much faster Windows 8 devices with touchscreen navigation. In addition, we’ve added 6 more TI-89 Titanium graphing calculators to our inventory, giving us 10 available for checkout at the Service Desk.

 

New publication by SUNY Geneseo’s Judy Albers examines Entrepreneurship in New York

SUNY researchers today released a study that shows New York State’s innovation profile is one of the strongest in the nation, and that continued focus on bolstering the upstate economy through Governor Cuomo’s START-UP NY program will be especially key to future growth and national competition for investment.

Entrepreneurship in New York is a joint collaboration by SUNY, the Research Foundation for SUNY (RF), SUNY Levin Institute, and SUNY Geneseo. This study shows that New York now commands a larger share of national venture investment than in past studies. Although, within this picture a significant disconnect is revealed. New York’s strong performance in academic R&D in the sciences stands in contrast with the relatively modest amounts of private investment available to move these innovations forward commercially.

Albers blog slider image (1)

Academic Research and Development (R&D) expenditures in New York State were $5.3 billion in 2012, second only to California. Additionally, the state’s share of venture capital invested nationally rose from 4 percent ($1.2B of $29.9B) in 2007 to 7 percent ($1.8B of $26.5B) in 2012, according to the report.

The SUNY study also found, however, that while New York’s innovation profile is on the rise, the majority of investment is funneled to New York City and that statewide, there remains a disconnect between strong academic research and the private investment needed to bring innovations to market. START-UP NY, which creates tax-free business zones in college communities, is cited as a unique opportunity to close the gap.

“New York is headed in the right direction, quickly becoming a more attractive destination for entrepreneurs and investors,” said SUNY Chancellor Nancy L. Zimpher. “While Governor Cuomo’s leadership has positioned our campuses to ramp up research and development, create jobs, and drive the economy, it is increasingly critical that the business climate upstate stay on pace not only with academia’s growth but with investment in New York City, and this study can show us how.”

“New York’s universities, both public and private, conduct more than $5 billion in research every year, and we want to create and sustain an environment in New York where those innovations can thrive,” said Dr. Tim Killeen, RF president and SUNY vice chancellor for research. “This study helps us understand the investment climate into which faculty, researchers, and students are bringing their innovations and ideas, and together with Governor Cuomo’s START-UP NY, it can guide us toward a more business-friendly and prosperous state economy.”

Carol Long, president of SUNY Geneseo, said, “The entrepreneurial drive of our young people will shape the future of our economy, but as this study shows, we must find investors willing to bring their dreams to life. We believe that the governor’s innovation agenda can make a real difference in the Finger Lakes region and throughout New York State, and we are proud to be a part of this important study.”

The study is authored by Van Arsdale Chair of Entrepreneurship at SUNY Geneseo Judith Albers, Ph.D., and RF Director of Business and Investor Development Thomas R. Moebus.

The complete study, Entrepreneurship in New York: The Mismatch Between Venture Capital and Academic R&D, is available online. It can also be downloaded for free as an e-book via open SUNY, or purchased in paperback, from Amazon.com.

Authors

Judith Albers, Ph.D.

Dr. Judith Albers, the Van Arsdale Chair of Entrepreneurship at SUNY Geneseo, and a respected voice in the innovation community of upstate New York, was the study’s lead researcher. “While the investment dollars in the state have increased,” said Dr. Albers, “a more detailed analysis indicates that the increase has been focused heavily on ‘soft tech’ in New York City.  In comparison, ‘hard tech’ companies in either upstate or downstate New York have a much smaller chance of securing funds to launch and grow. Start-ups in the life sciences face the most serious challenges.”

Thomas R. Moebus

Co-author Thomas Moebus, Director of Business and Investor Development at the Research Foundation for SUNY, said “The increase in venture investment in New York City suggests the potential for greater links between upstate opportunities and New York City investment to fuel entrepreneurial growth in fields like IT and services around the state.”

About the publication

Milne Library is very pleased to publish Entrepreneurship in New York and support the dissemination of this significant research report on the nature of venture investment in New York by the authors. Special thanks to Allison Brown, Milne’s Editor and Production Manager for making this and other works possible. More information about Milne Library’s Scholarship & Publishing Services is available online.

Security Issues for Internet Explorer

IE-blogIf you use Internet Explorer, you may want to check out what CIT NewsBytes has to say about protecting yourself from the latest hacking vulnerabilities in IE.

For now, CIT recommends updating your IE browser and using IE “only for Geneseo websites that require IE. All non-Geneseo websites should be accessed with an alternate browser (Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.).”

Check the CIT NewsBytes for updates on this security issue.

Integrative Teaching: The Classroom Meets Real Life

Rose-Marie Chierici speaks to patients at mobile clinic in HaitiOn Friday, April 25, 2014, the College will celebrate Dr. Rose-Marie Chierici, a dynamic Professor and Department Chair who has brought her field work in Haiti (Haiti Outreach-Pwoje Espwa, H.O.P.E.) to the Geneseo classroom. Dr. Chierici began her career at SUNY Geneseo in 1994, and was promoted (belatedly, in this librarian’s opinion) to Full Professor in August 2013. We now say goodbye to this inspirational teacher, researcher, and applied anthropologist . . . but not before she teaches one more course in Fall 2014.

Dr. Chierici first worked with Librarian Kim Davies-Hoffman in 2002 which sparked a long journey of efforts to infuse scholarly research skills into her students’ coursework. Between the two instructors, they experimented with many combinations of and approaches to teaching – from a one-time classroom visit from the librarian to a more collaborative and semester-long schedule of mini librarian visits, to the latest and most successful mixing of anthropological and development theory, practical on-the-ground skills, and research and technology training.

It is this last model of collaborative teaching that will keep Dr. Chierici on campus, in the classroom, for one more semester.

Opening ppt slide of a student-run presentation, 3Ts ConferenceIn March 2014, several students from Dr. Chierici’s course, ANTH 307: Third World Development, joined Kim Davies-Hoffman in a 3Ts Conference presentation that spotlighted the high-impact class experience that transformed typical college students into NGO development workers, if only for a semester. With a unique classroom structure, students learned anthropological and development theory on Tuesdays and became members of a simulated nongovernmental organization on Thursdays. The first few Thursdays were spent in class with Davies-Hoffman learning different research strategies and technological tools, but after that, two student-ran NGOs (M.A.R.K., Mothers Advocating for Reproductive Knowledge and The Epula Project) created their own destiny. With two team leaders guiding their respective NGO, students were responsible for researching and making crucial decisions for their project.

– In what region of the world would they focus their work?
– On what issue(s) would they focus their work?
– How would they discover enough detailed information to truly “know” the region and its people?
– What programs would they put into place to address their chosen development issue?

The culminating fruits of the NGOs’ labor was a 75-minute presentation to classmates, as well as respected professors and administrators on campus, supported by a project website that detailed all their research, ideas, and reflections. A follow-up conference presentation was icing on the cake as students had the opportunity to share their transformational learning experience with professionals (teachers, instructional designers, librarians, etc.) around New York State. A potential idea of pairing up with students at the Naples Central School District on similar NGO projects was discussed following the Geneseo students’ presentation.

Jordan Laux graduated in December 2013Since Fall 2013, many students of ANTH 307 have expressed their continued enthusiasm for the NGO experience, stating that it was the best class they have taken at SUNY Geneseo. As many of those students look to graduating in May and contemplate future career plans, development work has become a much more real possibility.  Jordan Laux (pictured on the far right), a member of and webmaster for M.A.R.K.,  graduated in December 2013 and has reported back on the immediate connections she has made from her lessons learned in Third World Development and her current daily work in Syracuse, NY.  Take a listen to what ANTH 307 and her experience working with Dr. Rose-Marie Chierici and Kim Davies-Hoffman has meant to Jordan.

 

Commit An Act of Green for Earth Day

earthday2014This year, earthday.org is focusing their theme on reaching 2 Billion Acts of Green.  Commit your act of green by telling earthday.org what you are doing to save the earth!

Need some ideas?  Here are a few to help reduce your ecological footprint:

  • Purchase products that use less packaging and those you do purchase should be made out of post-consumer recycled materials.
  • Take less vacations involving air travel.
  • Carpool and purchase vehicles with better fuel economy.
  • Buy locally produced food (less packaging, trasport costs and the like mean a smaller footprint).
  • Plant a fruit/vegetable garden and compost organic materials (zero packaging or transport costs).
  • Plan the week’s meals in advance to cut down on food waste, trips to the market and impulse buying.
  • Buy second-hand items and donate or sell your unwanted appliances, clothes, books and furniture.
  • Lower your thermostat by 4 degrees (and program it to stay low!)
  • Recycle (list of recyclables from the EPA).
  • Use the green option from your public utilities provider.

Or, try some of these other ideas for living green.

You can also take the  footprint calculator quiz to measure your ecological footprint.  The calculator measures how much land it would take to support your lifestyle based on the country’s average consumption profile.

Change Passwords to Avoid the Heartache of Heartbleed

HeartbleedIf you’ve been under a rock the past week, you may not be aware that many of your online accounts might have been compromised by the heartbleed bug.  The security breach is with the servers you have been logging into (e.g. Gmail, instant messaging, Facebook, Instagram, Netflix, Dropbox, etc.), so the best thing that you can do is change your passwords for those accounts sooner rather than later.

Mashable has compiled a great list of accounts that may have been affected including social networks, email providers, online shopping sites, financial institutions and more.  Bottom line, now might be a good time to update your passwords and continue to do so on a regular basis.

Geneseo’s CIT NewsBytes offers some other tips as well and will continue to update the campus on this issue.

Latest Open SUNY Textbook Features Interactive Elements

by Cyril Oberlander

OpenSUNYTextbook-InfoLit-blogWhat makes a good researcher? When navigating today’s complex information ecosystem, researchers in any setting must have a variety of tools at their disposal, as well as the knowledge and focus to use them in an efficient and productive manner.

The authors of The Information Literacy User’s Guide have provided an essential roadmap for becoming a successful and self-aware researcher. This textbook introduces students to critical concepts of information literacy using relevant techniques and materials designed for maneuvering through an information-saturated and technology-rich world. Specifically, it utilizes two essential concepts: The Seven Pillars Model, developed by the Society of College, National, and University Libraries in the United Kingdom, as well as, the concept of information literacy as a “metaliteracy,” a model developed by Trudi Jacobson of SUNY University at Albany, and Thomas Mackey of SUNY Empire State College.

The Information Literacy User’s Guide examines information literacy as it relates to the liberal arts as well as the hard sciences. This textbook is designed for undergraduate level courses with a research component and information literacy courses, or for independent learning. The individual chapters can also be incorporated into one-shot sessions or flipped classrooms. Intelligently engaging, with relevant examples of real-life research pitfalls, case studies, and scenarios, this textbook offers many hands-on exercises and interactive quizzes to aid the progress of the audience from researching novices to capable information locators, creators, and sharers.
Available free online at: opensuny.org

About Open SUNY Textbooks

Open SUNY Textbooks is a ground-breaking open access textbook publishing initiative established by State University of New York libraries and supported by SUNY Innovative Instruction Technology Grants. This highly innovative initiative publishes high-quality, cost-effective course resources by engaging faculty as authors and peer-reviewers, and libraries as an integral part of the publishing infrastructure.

Launched in 2012, this pioneering initiative provides an opportunity for higher education to be more involved in publishing high-quality affordable textbooks. The first pilot will produce 15 published titles in 2013-2014, with 15 more titles to be published in a second pilot for 2014-2015. Participating libraries in the first pilot include SUNY Geneseo, College at Brockport, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, SUNY Fredonia, Upstate Medical University, and University at Buffalo, with support from other SUNY libraries and SUNY Press.

Lastly, with much appreciation to the authors and editors for making this textbook possible, we would also like to thank Chris Rudecoff (SUNY Morrisville), Allison Brown, Leah Root, and other members of the SUNY Geneseo Publishing Team, participating SUNY libraries, SUNY IITG grant funding, and SUNY Press for helping to make this publication a reality. Publishing open textbooks is as much about providing access to educational resources and lowering the cost of education, as it is about empowering teaching and learning, authors and readers.

For more information and to access these open textbooks, please see http://opensuny.org.

Geneseo Pride Alliance Sponsors LGBTQ Display in Milne

by Thomas Mccarthy

LGBTQ-Display_blog

LGBTQ Display near the stairs on Milne’s main level

Geneseo’s SA sponsored LGBTQ group on campus is the Pride Alliance. The organization serves a variety of roles from providing a weekly safe space for members of the community to outreach onand outside the scope of campus. Pride focuses, like other cultural clubs, on building a local community within Geneseo. A subgroup of Pride, Advocacy, was formed to specialize in activism and outreach projects at Geneseo and to the surrounding community. Projects in the past that Advocacy formed range from combating the “Ban on Gay Blood” during blood drives to contacting local high schools organizations similar to Pride and sharing resources/ having dialogues with them.

This semester Advocacy formally reconvened after a brief hiatus, and some of the first projects the group decided to pursue was establishing a LGBTQ display in Milne Library and acquiring and maintaining a communal book shelf outside the Pride office. Both projects had similar goals: to not only increase visibility and awareness outside the Pride community about LGBTQ history, politics, and modern issues, but also to help those inside the community find resources when often they can be fragmented.

Both projects sought to introduce students to materials they otherwise might have not known
about or familiar. Most educational experiences, to my understanding talking to people inside and outside of Pride, do not cover or educate about any LGBTQ topics. Various education systems fail students when they do not recognize history and lived experiences of any group of people. LGBTQ students have much higher risks for mental health problems and suicide, so the necessity of acknowledging and giving space for these students to discover themselves and for others to begin to understand them is essential.

Teachers and Educators should be made aware of ongoing issues and concerns for LGBTQ students, and be conscious and sensitive to the difficulties and potential marginalization and abuse these students can face. The sharing and studying of these texts takes these experiences and people out of the “taboo” area which only perpetuates the harms towards these students even more. By sharing these texts or even making people aware of them, we hoped to articulate and shed light on the histories, literature, and figures in the LGBTQ timeline that are relegated, consciously or not, in pre-collegiate education systems.

The direct benefit of teaching and educating about LGBTQ issues and texts is that students can begin to view these people as legitimate and common rather than taboo and deviant. By normalizing these discussions and communications, especially by studying and being made aware of the texts, not only can LGBTQ students feel more comfortable and more receptive in educational settings, but teachers can begin to respond to and intervene on behalf of these students in environments that may feel hostile or unsafe for LGBTQ students.

Many texts also work as tools to help LGBTQ students even if they do not initially appear to be LGBTQ related. Tons of our canonized authors from Greek poets to Shakespeare to Thoreau are thought or known to have been what today is classified under the LGBTQ umbrella. Although their experiences are different, acknowledging these authors, and not rewriting them as heterosexual, supports and validates the students struggling with these issues. Many of the texts that are displayed in Milne are historical texts that are highlight facts about previous societies and peoples that had spaces and recognition for LGBTQ and same sex relationships.

Stories are our fundamentally way of situating ourselves to those around us. So often the stories of LGBTQ people are not shared or ignored. The goal of this project is to help others become aware of these experiences that support and validate LGBTQ students and to also to make others outside those identities aware of the value of those people around them today and the richness and meaning that can be learned and taught from experiences of LGBTQ people.

Be sure to check out the LGBTQ education display near the staircase on the main level!

To find out more or to get involved, attend a weekly Pride and Advocacy meeting on Thursdays at 8 pm in the College Union’s Hunt Room (Rm. 135).

For research help on LGBTQ issues, check out Milne’s LGBTQ Studies library Guide.

Internships available in Milne Library for Fall 2014

Milne Library has openings for student interns for the fall semester.

While we can’t offer you a paycheck, internships at Milne offer course credit and some other distinct advantages:

  • On campus
  • No one will ask you to make coffee
  • The only photocopying you will do will be for your own projects
  • You’re here anyway, might as well get 2-4 course credits
  • Library staff are dedicated to making your internship a learning experience
  • Experience working in a library or on publishing projects will look good on your resume

InternshipInternships in Milne will be geared towards your interests, related to services and projects the library is working on. While the amount of credit you can receive for internships varies, most library internships work best at the 2-4 credit hour level (about 5 to 11 hours per week).

Milne Library internships are ideal for students who are interested in exploring careers in publishing, libraries, archives or museums.

We are seeking interns related to:

Library Reference – For students who love library research and are considering a career as a librarian, this internship will give you hands on experience assisting students and faculty with their research at our reference desk.  Interns will receive comprehensive training and mentoring.  Interns will also have the opportunity to develop special projects such as tutorials, research guides or other tools to assist students with research.

Editing and publishing – Milne Library Scholarship and Publishing Services is seeking interns to assist with editorial and production tasks ranging from preparing manuscripts for text layout and production using Adobe InDesign, to copyediting and proofreading manuscripts using track changes in MS-WORD. Depending on skills and needs, internship may also be focused on specific areas of publishing, such as; marketing or graphic design.

Book marketing – Milne Library Scholarship and Publishing Services is seeking Book Marketing Interns to assist with marketing tasks for a range of publications, including; Open SUNY Textbooks, Special Collections Reprints, and other publications. Intern will evaluate book marketing strategies, develop and conduct marketing material and strategies for forthcoming titles.

Library Special Collections – The Milne Library Technical Services unit is looking for a student interested in learning and applying new skills in special collections and archives practice; digitization, metadata and collection management. Most suitable for students interested in history, museums, archives, or libraries.

Students interested in any library internships can contact Milne Library Business Manager Ryann Fair ([email protected], 585.245.5591).