Geneseo Pride Alliance Sponsors LGBTQ Display in Milne

by Thomas Mccarthy

LGBTQ-Display_blog

LGBTQ Display near the stairs on Milne’s main level

Geneseo’s SA sponsored LGBTQ group on campus is the Pride Alliance. The organization serves a variety of roles from providing a weekly safe space for members of the community to outreach onand outside the scope of campus. Pride focuses, like other cultural clubs, on building a local community within Geneseo. A subgroup of Pride, Advocacy, was formed to specialize in activism and outreach projects at Geneseo and to the surrounding community. Projects in the past that Advocacy formed range from combating the “Ban on Gay Blood” during blood drives to contacting local high schools organizations similar to Pride and sharing resources/ having dialogues with them.

This semester Advocacy formally reconvened after a brief hiatus, and some of the first projects the group decided to pursue was establishing a LGBTQ display in Milne Library and acquiring and maintaining a communal book shelf outside the Pride office. Both projects had similar goals: to not only increase visibility and awareness outside the Pride community about LGBTQ history, politics, and modern issues, but also to help those inside the community find resources when often they can be fragmented.

Both projects sought to introduce students to materials they otherwise might have not known
about or familiar. Most educational experiences, to my understanding talking to people inside and outside of Pride, do not cover or educate about any LGBTQ topics. Various education systems fail students when they do not recognize history and lived experiences of any group of people. LGBTQ students have much higher risks for mental health problems and suicide, so the necessity of acknowledging and giving space for these students to discover themselves and for others to begin to understand them is essential.

Teachers and Educators should be made aware of ongoing issues and concerns for LGBTQ students, and be conscious and sensitive to the difficulties and potential marginalization and abuse these students can face. The sharing and studying of these texts takes these experiences and people out of the “taboo” area which only perpetuates the harms towards these students even more. By sharing these texts or even making people aware of them, we hoped to articulate and shed light on the histories, literature, and figures in the LGBTQ timeline that are relegated, consciously or not, in pre-collegiate education systems.

The direct benefit of teaching and educating about LGBTQ issues and texts is that students can begin to view these people as legitimate and common rather than taboo and deviant. By normalizing these discussions and communications, especially by studying and being made aware of the texts, not only can LGBTQ students feel more comfortable and more receptive in educational settings, but teachers can begin to respond to and intervene on behalf of these students in environments that may feel hostile or unsafe for LGBTQ students.

Many texts also work as tools to help LGBTQ students even if they do not initially appear to be LGBTQ related. Tons of our canonized authors from Greek poets to Shakespeare to Thoreau are thought or known to have been what today is classified under the LGBTQ umbrella. Although their experiences are different, acknowledging these authors, and not rewriting them as heterosexual, supports and validates the students struggling with these issues. Many of the texts that are displayed in Milne are historical texts that are highlight facts about previous societies and peoples that had spaces and recognition for LGBTQ and same sex relationships.

Stories are our fundamentally way of situating ourselves to those around us. So often the stories of LGBTQ people are not shared or ignored. The goal of this project is to help others become aware of these experiences that support and validate LGBTQ students and to also to make others outside those identities aware of the value of those people around them today and the richness and meaning that can be learned and taught from experiences of LGBTQ people.

Be sure to check out the LGBTQ education display near the staircase on the main level!

To find out more or to get involved, attend a weekly Pride and Advocacy meeting on Thursdays at 8 pm in the College Union’s Hunt Room (Rm. 135).

For research help on LGBTQ issues, check out Milne’s LGBTQ Studies library Guide.

Internships available in Milne Library for Fall 2014

Milne Library has openings for student interns for the fall semester.

While we can’t offer you a paycheck, internships at Milne offer course credit and some other distinct advantages:

  • On campus
  • No one will ask you to make coffee
  • The only photocopying you will do will be for your own projects
  • You’re here anyway, might as well get 2-4 course credits
  • Library staff are dedicated to making your internship a learning experience
  • Experience working in a library or on publishing projects will look good on your resume

InternshipInternships in Milne will be geared towards your interests, related to services and projects the library is working on. While the amount of credit you can receive for internships varies, most library internships work best at the 2-4 credit hour level (about 5 to 11 hours per week).

Milne Library internships are ideal for students who are interested in exploring careers in publishing, libraries, archives or museums.

We are seeking interns related to:

Library Reference – For students who love library research and are considering a career as a librarian, this internship will give you hands on experience assisting students and faculty with their research at our reference desk.  Interns will receive comprehensive training and mentoring.  Interns will also have the opportunity to develop special projects such as tutorials, research guides or other tools to assist students with research.

Editing and publishing – Milne Library Scholarship and Publishing Services is seeking interns to assist with editorial and production tasks ranging from preparing manuscripts for text layout and production using Adobe InDesign, to copyediting and proofreading manuscripts using track changes in MS-WORD. Depending on skills and needs, internship may also be focused on specific areas of publishing, such as; marketing or graphic design.

Book marketing – Milne Library Scholarship and Publishing Services is seeking Book Marketing Interns to assist with marketing tasks for a range of publications, including; Open SUNY Textbooks, Special Collections Reprints, and other publications. Intern will evaluate book marketing strategies, develop and conduct marketing material and strategies for forthcoming titles.

Library Special Collections – The Milne Library Technical Services unit is looking for a student interested in learning and applying new skills in special collections and archives practice; digitization, metadata and collection management. Most suitable for students interested in history, museums, archives, or libraries.

Students interested in any library internships can contact Milne Library Business Manager Ryann Fair ([email protected], 585.245.5591).

Transforming Teaching and Learning with Digital Resources

We are happy to announce a new resource available to SUNY Geneseo School of Education (SOE) students and faculty – PBS LearningMedia.  The link to the site is included in this blog and can also be found on the Education Lesson Planning library guide.

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PBS LearningMedia
PBS LearningMedia provides direct access to thousands of classroom-ready, curriculum-targeted digital resources. Resources are aligned to Common Core and national standards and include videos and interactives, as well as audio, documents, and in-depth lesson plans. The site contains free as well as *subscription-based content.

A sample from their new collection – Engaging Math Resources for Grades 5-8 – contains over 400 digital resources aligned with grades 5-8 Common Core State Standards for Mathematics and focused on critical middle school math concepts. Collection includes videos, interactives, animations, and infographics and addresses topics such as; Operations and Algebraic Thinking, Number & Operations—Fractions, The Number System, Number & Operations in Base Ten.

*You must have a SOE email address to access the subscription-based content.
Openclipart.org. (2013). Android. Retrieved from http://pixabay.com/en/android-bot-robot-television-happy-161184/

Can’t access library databases? Try clearing your browser cache.

A recent security update to Milne Library’s EZProxy system (the system that permits off campus use of library databases) has lead to problems for some library users.

Clicking on a bookmarked database link or a link from the homepage may result in an error message related to the SSL certificate, or the browser may simply freeze.

If you are experiencing this issue, try clearing your browser cache. WikiHow provides step-by-step directions to clear your cache for most browsers.

SSL Certificate issue

 

If you are still having problems, stop by the library to talk with our Tech Help staff or call us at 585-245-5608.

Spring Break Hours for Milne

SpringBreakCal

Milne Library hours for March 15 – March 23 are as follows:
CLOSED - Saturday, March 15 & Sunday, March 16
OPEN –  Monday, March 17 (8:00 AM – 4:00 PM)
OPEN –  Tuesday, March 18 (8:00 AM – 4:00 PM)
OPEN –  Wednesday, March 19 (8:00 AM – 4:00 PM)
OPEN –  Thursday, March 20 (8:00 AM – 4:00 PM)
OPEN - Friday, March 21 (8:00 AM – 4:00 PM)
CLOSED – Saturday, March 22
OPEN – Sunday, March 23 (12:00 PM – 1:00 AM)
Regular semester hours resume on Monday, March 24.
Please see our Library Hours webpage for more information about library hours.

Daylight Saving Time begins Sunday, March 9.  

springDaylight Saving Time begins on Sunday, March 9.  Don’t forget to set your clocks ahead by 1 hour!

Some of our clocks may be incorrect for a while…
Some of the library’s clocks will reset automatically on Sunday.  Unfortunately, not all of them are controlled by the master clock.  We do have folks manually resetting them, but it may take some time to get to all of them.  Thanks for your patience as we make the change!

What is daylight savings time anyway, and why do we do it?
Daylight-savings time is the advancing of the clock one hour ahead of the local standard time in order to increase the hours of daylight available at the end of the day.

The idea originated with none other than Benjamin Franklin in the 1700s.  But it didn’t really catch on until WWI when England and Germany put it into practice as a wartime measure for making full use of daylight hours.  By 1925, it became permanent in England.

The U.S. also took advantage of daylight savings for both World Wars, but it didn’t become a permanent fixture for most states until the oil crisis in the mid-1960′s.

Source: Summer Time. (2002). In Brewer’s Dictionary of Modern Phrase and Fable.

Workshop Series to help students with GREAT Day Projects

GREATday-blogParticipating in GREAT Day is a significant honor, but it can also be an intimidating experience.  A lot of work goes into papers, posters, and presentations, and students want their work to stand out in a good way.  But what is one supposed to do if he or she doesn’t know how to design a good poster or write a proper abstract?

The Center for Academic Excellence has the answer!

For the very first time, the C.A.E. is working with staff and faculty across campus to bring you a series of workshops designed for first-timers and GREAT Day veterans alike.  We already have five workshops scheduled and ready to go, and we’re working on adding a few more to the mix in the coming weeks.

So if you really want your GREAT Day project to stand out for all the right reasons, take a look at what we’re offering and start signing up!  Spaces are limited, so don’t delay!

Design Principles – February 25th, 5:15pm to 6:15pm, CU 319

Graphic design is hard.  This workshop keys in on three fundamental elements of design (spacing, color, and text) to help you draft a memorable and effective GREAT Day poster.  Taught by Kristen Fuest. Sign-Up:  http://goo.gl/AkFqV2 (limit of 24)

Abstract Writing – March 3rd, 3:30pm to 5:00pm, Milne 105

Unsure of how to write a proper abstract for your GREAT Day project?  This 90 minute workshop will help you through the process.  After some brief instruction, you will have the opportunity to write your GREAT Day abstract with guided help from some of SUNY Geneseo’s best writing tutors.  Taught by Gillian Paku and Writing Learning Center tutors. Sign-Up:  http://goo.gl/eUly1z (limit of 24)

Creating a Poster Using InDesign – March 4th, 4:30pm to 5:30pm, Milne 104

InDesign is a versatile design program you can find on pretty much every public computer on campus.  However, many SUNY Geneseo students are unfamiliar with it.  Come learn the ropes in this one-hour workshop and turn that amazing GREAT Day poster idea into a reality.  Taught by Steve Dresbach. Sign-Up:  http://goo.gl/pCpt13 (limit of 40)

Creating a Poster Using PowerPoint – March 4th, 5:45pm to 6:45pm, Milne 104

It’s not just for presentations!  When it comes to creating GREAT Day posters, PowerPoint is a friendly and familiar alternative for students who don’t necessarily want to learn a brand new program.  Taught by Steve Dresbach. Sign-Up:  http://goo.gl/QlChlH (limit of 40)

Creating a PowerPoint Presentation – April 1st, 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Milne 104

Just about all of us have used PowerPoint before, but despite your relative familiarity with the program, there’s probably a lot of really neat features you never knew about.  Learn how to make your GREAT Day presentation stand out with this sixty minute workshop.  Taught by Steve Dresbach. Sign-Up:  http://goo.gl/jYVXSG (limit of 40)

For more information on future workshops, visit www.geneseo.edu/library/cae-workshops

Beef up your teaching skills & resume!

3Ts-blogSUNY Geneseo will host the 4th Annual Transliteracy, Technology & Teaching Conference (3Ts) on Friday, March 14, 2014.  Registration is now open and we encourage those who do/will teach or train others to consider attending.

You’ll join librarians, faculty, instructional designers and K-12 educators workshops where presenters highlight their dynamic teaching collaborations and/or model their instructional technique(s).

Registration costs: $20 for professionals and $10 for students.

For more information, descriptions of conference sessions and to register, visit http://threetees.weebly.com/.

Student use of Milne Library: What you told us and what we’re going to do about it

Last fall, Milne Library staff distributed a survey on library tables asking students why and how they used Milne Library spaces. We also asked students for suggestions about how the spaces could be improved. We are grateful to those of you who took the time to fill out the survey and turn it in – your responses will help us plan future improvements to the library.

General thoughts:
We received 456 responses, pretty evenly distributed among the three floors of the library.

Overall, students are hard at work in our library. Students spend their time doing homework, studying, writing and working on projects. Smaller numbers of students are visiting with friends, eating lunch or passing time on the internet (mostly in association with more serious endeavors).

Students choose seats based on their particular studying needs. While many students indicated that they need to concentrate (and selected spaces on the third floor as a result), others needed to be around people or needed space to spread out.  In some cases, students selected space out of necessity – it was the only spot available. Some students suggested that the comfortable seating was great for naps, while others used the comfy chairs for intense reading.

Power:
One of the biggest complaints (in certain areas) was the lack of power outlets. As we renovate new areas, we will endeavor to add power. This isn’t cheep, however, and requires extensive prior planning. Our 50 year old building wasn’t equipped to handle modern power demands, so most additional power outlets require upgrades to our electrical network.

The survey responses provided us with several locations where additional power outlets would be appreciated the most.

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Students also identified areas where outlets or study carrel lights weren’t working, and we are working hard to make the necessary repairs.

Suggestions and changes:
We got some great feedback on the type of tables students like. With a few dissenters, students really don’t like the new Y-shaped tables on the main floor.  A few even tried to explain why:

Screen Shot 2014-02-12 at 11.19.37 AM

We won’t be buying more of those.

Students also recommended filling spaces with a variety of table sizes, in order to avoid problems when one person takes up a table intended for six. We intend to remodel some spaces on the lower level of Milne this summer, and we are taking these suggestions into account when ordering tables.

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In areas where students had access to whiteboards, they expressed how much they like them. As a result, we will be looking for places to add additional whiteboards (as money allows).

There were a few suggestions that we won’t be able to accommodate.  We won’t be adding a fourth floor or getting a new building any time soon (unfortunately). We will not be adding a hot tub, an open bar, a bouncy castle or a taco bell. While turning the library into a TARDIS (bigger on the inside) would help with our not-enough-space issues, our technical staff (while extraordinary) have not quite figured out how to do this. Sorry.

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Getting the Most From Google Scholar, or, Squirrels are Friends, not Food

Editor’s Note: This guest post was written by Geneseo senior and Milne Library intern Margaret Craft.

I’m sure when you think of Google, you think of fuzzy dogs, craigs list, and the strange questions Google helpfully fills in for you, including

and the deepest most applicable question lingering at our core:

when can you eat squirrel?

which a truly desperate college student on Geneseo’s campus might start to wonder, as the meal plan dwindles and you keep losing staring contests. (Vegans: it’s okay. Keep reading, it gets better, maybe.)

Squirrel

Day after day, eventually you start to wonder what you couldn’t eat those little buggers on. Pizza? Other squirrels?

This might require some research. For all you know, studies at Geneseo may have found a significant portion of squirrels have secret identities and should therefore be protected, not baked.

Superhero squirrel

What you, the savvy Geneseo student, would thus benefit from using is the mind-bogglingly awesome part of Google devoted to this need, sneakily hidden under products. Yes, indeed this grail of searching is none other than GOOGLE SCHOLAR, a versatile research tool that looks for your search terms in articles, patents, and book citations.

On the homepage it tries to be modest and say it only looks for articles, but it will search for books as well. Such results will appear with a [BOOK] designation at the beginning of the citation.

Once you’ve typed a search term in, such as “squirrel,” you’ll be shown a master list of all results.

Google Scholar search results

You may note that the third result on the list concerns movement representations in squirrel monkeys, which, while adorable are not a viable food source on Geneseo’s campus and thus not your concern.

To get rid of squirrel monkey results, you can exclude the word “monkey” in the advanced search. Clicking on the arrow next to the search box pulls up the advanced search functions.

Advanced search

To get rid of squirrel monkey results, you can exclude the word “monkey”:

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You can further narrow results down by using the exact phrase option:

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and now the top result (no superhero squirrel research in sight, sadly) based on my choice to sort by relevancy  is:

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Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.31.59 PMBummer. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a not so fun thing where your brain degenerates through infection by proteins called prions. Apparently it is possible to contract the disease through eating the brains of squirrels that are infected with these prions. However, when I look at more recent results by asking Google to only look for results in the last 14 years, I get this article, which is directly available for free through the link for Springer at the right:

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It concludes that it is unlikely that infectious prions will appear in red squirrels. Whew. But maybe we have gray squirrels…

Underneath the citation and excerpt, you can see how many times it has been cited, none in this case, and how many websites have the full text available (All 11 versions). The link for “Related articles” at the far left will show related materials that includes others more recent than this article, these may include other types of squirrels. There is also the option to cite the article directly or save it to “my library,” which is a personalized memory bank that will keep track of citations you’re interested in.

Now the varied danger of eating squirrel brains is corroborated by another article that talks about more than just red squirrels:

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It has been cited by 11 other more recent articles, which could be useful for further research into the topic. Additionally, there is no link to a free version to the right of the citation, meaning none of the 8 versions showed are available for free download. Boo.

You could cry, but wait! There should be, if you are on Geneseo’s wifi network or using an on-campus computer, a “Get It” link to the right of all articles. It may also be listed under “More” under the citation as well. This will take you to the glorious IDS request page, which should get you the article within 48 hours! REJOICE PEOPLE.

And if you are not on-campus, there is an alternative. Click “Settings” on this menu:

Google Scholar settings

What will appear is this:

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Type, as I have, SUNY Geneseo and hit search.  Check the box next to “Milne Library, SUNY Geneseo – Get it”.

Now hit “Save” and you will return to your search.  Now when you look to the right of a citation, you should see the Get It next to it, or More below the citation itself.

Happy searching*!

*Just remember to research before you eat. You never know.

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*Vegans: it’s okay. Keep reading, it gets better.