Spring Break Hours for Milne

SpringBreakCal

Milne Library hours for March 15 – March 23 are as follows:
CLOSED - Saturday, March 15 & Sunday, March 16
OPEN –  Monday, March 17 (8:00 AM – 4:00 PM)
OPEN –  Tuesday, March 18 (8:00 AM – 4:00 PM)
OPEN –  Wednesday, March 19 (8:00 AM – 4:00 PM)
OPEN –  Thursday, March 20 (8:00 AM – 4:00 PM)
OPEN - Friday, March 21 (8:00 AM – 4:00 PM)
CLOSED – Saturday, March 22
OPEN – Sunday, March 23 (12:00 PM – 1:00 AM)
Regular semester hours resume on Monday, March 24.
Please see our Library Hours webpage for more information about library hours.

Daylight Saving Time begins Sunday, March 9.  

springDaylight Saving Time begins on Sunday, March 9.  Don’t forget to set your clocks ahead by 1 hour!

Some of our clocks may be incorrect for a while…
Some of the library’s clocks will reset automatically on Sunday.  Unfortunately, not all of them are controlled by the master clock.  We do have folks manually resetting them, but it may take some time to get to all of them.  Thanks for your patience as we make the change!

What is daylight savings time anyway, and why do we do it?
Daylight-savings time is the advancing of the clock one hour ahead of the local standard time in order to increase the hours of daylight available at the end of the day.

The idea originated with none other than Benjamin Franklin in the 1700s.  But it didn’t really catch on until WWI when England and Germany put it into practice as a wartime measure for making full use of daylight hours.  By 1925, it became permanent in England.

The U.S. also took advantage of daylight savings for both World Wars, but it didn’t become a permanent fixture for most states until the oil crisis in the mid-1960′s.

Source: Summer Time. (2002). In Brewer’s Dictionary of Modern Phrase and Fable.

Workshop Series to help students with GREAT Day Projects

GREATday-blogParticipating in GREAT Day is a significant honor, but it can also be an intimidating experience.  A lot of work goes into papers, posters, and presentations, and students want their work to stand out in a good way.  But what is one supposed to do if he or she doesn’t know how to design a good poster or write a proper abstract?

The Center for Academic Excellence has the answer!

For the very first time, the C.A.E. is working with staff and faculty across campus to bring you a series of workshops designed for first-timers and GREAT Day veterans alike.  We already have five workshops scheduled and ready to go, and we’re working on adding a few more to the mix in the coming weeks.

So if you really want your GREAT Day project to stand out for all the right reasons, take a look at what we’re offering and start signing up!  Spaces are limited, so don’t delay!

Design Principles – February 25th, 5:15pm to 6:15pm, CU 319

Graphic design is hard.  This workshop keys in on three fundamental elements of design (spacing, color, and text) to help you draft a memorable and effective GREAT Day poster.  Taught by Kristen Fuest. Sign-Up:  http://goo.gl/AkFqV2 (limit of 24)

Abstract Writing – March 3rd, 3:30pm to 5:00pm, Milne 105

Unsure of how to write a proper abstract for your GREAT Day project?  This 90 minute workshop will help you through the process.  After some brief instruction, you will have the opportunity to write your GREAT Day abstract with guided help from some of SUNY Geneseo’s best writing tutors.  Taught by Gillian Paku and Writing Learning Center tutors. Sign-Up:  http://goo.gl/eUly1z (limit of 24)

Creating a Poster Using InDesign – March 4th, 4:30pm to 5:30pm, Milne 104

InDesign is a versatile design program you can find on pretty much every public computer on campus.  However, many SUNY Geneseo students are unfamiliar with it.  Come learn the ropes in this one-hour workshop and turn that amazing GREAT Day poster idea into a reality.  Taught by Steve Dresbach. Sign-Up:  http://goo.gl/pCpt13 (limit of 40)

Creating a Poster Using PowerPoint – March 4th, 5:45pm to 6:45pm, Milne 104

It’s not just for presentations!  When it comes to creating GREAT Day posters, PowerPoint is a friendly and familiar alternative for students who don’t necessarily want to learn a brand new program.  Taught by Steve Dresbach. Sign-Up:  http://goo.gl/QlChlH (limit of 40)

Creating a PowerPoint Presentation – April 1st, 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Milne 104

Just about all of us have used PowerPoint before, but despite your relative familiarity with the program, there’s probably a lot of really neat features you never knew about.  Learn how to make your GREAT Day presentation stand out with this sixty minute workshop.  Taught by Steve Dresbach. Sign-Up:  http://goo.gl/jYVXSG (limit of 40)

For more information on future workshops, visit www.geneseo.edu/library/cae-workshops

Beef up your teaching skills & resume!

3Ts-blogSUNY Geneseo will host the 4th Annual Transliteracy, Technology & Teaching Conference (3Ts) on Friday, March 14, 2014.  Registration is now open and we encourage those who do/will teach or train others to consider attending.

You’ll join librarians, faculty, instructional designers and K-12 educators workshops where presenters highlight their dynamic teaching collaborations and/or model their instructional technique(s).

Registration costs: $20 for professionals and $10 for students.

For more information, descriptions of conference sessions and to register, visit http://threetees.weebly.com/.

Student use of Milne Library: What you told us and what we’re going to do about it

Last fall, Milne Library staff distributed a survey on library tables asking students why and how they used Milne Library spaces. We also asked students for suggestions about how the spaces could be improved. We are grateful to those of you who took the time to fill out the survey and turn it in – your responses will help us plan future improvements to the library.

General thoughts:
We received 456 responses, pretty evenly distributed among the three floors of the library.

Overall, students are hard at work in our library. Students spend their time doing homework, studying, writing and working on projects. Smaller numbers of students are visiting with friends, eating lunch or passing time on the internet (mostly in association with more serious endeavors).

Students choose seats based on their particular studying needs. While many students indicated that they need to concentrate (and selected spaces on the third floor as a result), others needed to be around people or needed space to spread out.  In some cases, students selected space out of necessity – it was the only spot available. Some students suggested that the comfortable seating was great for naps, while others used the comfy chairs for intense reading.

Power:
One of the biggest complaints (in certain areas) was the lack of power outlets. As we renovate new areas, we will endeavor to add power. This isn’t cheep, however, and requires extensive prior planning. Our 50 year old building wasn’t equipped to handle modern power demands, so most additional power outlets require upgrades to our electrical network.

The survey responses provided us with several locations where additional power outlets would be appreciated the most.

Screen Shot 2014-02-12 at 11.18.14 AM

Students also identified areas where outlets or study carrel lights weren’t working, and we are working hard to make the necessary repairs.

Suggestions and changes:
We got some great feedback on the type of tables students like. With a few dissenters, students really don’t like the new Y-shaped tables on the main floor.  A few even tried to explain why:

Screen Shot 2014-02-12 at 11.19.37 AM

We won’t be buying more of those.

Students also recommended filling spaces with a variety of table sizes, in order to avoid problems when one person takes up a table intended for six. We intend to remodel some spaces on the lower level of Milne this summer, and we are taking these suggestions into account when ordering tables.

Screen Shot 2014-02-12 at 11.20.41 AM

In areas where students had access to whiteboards, they expressed how much they like them. As a result, we will be looking for places to add additional whiteboards (as money allows).

There were a few suggestions that we won’t be able to accommodate.  We won’t be adding a fourth floor or getting a new building any time soon (unfortunately). We will not be adding a hot tub, an open bar, a bouncy castle or a taco bell. While turning the library into a TARDIS (bigger on the inside) would help with our not-enough-space issues, our technical staff (while extraordinary) have not quite figured out how to do this. Sorry.

Fotor0212112725

 

Getting the Most From Google Scholar, or, Squirrels are Friends, not Food

Editor’s Note: This guest post was written by Geneseo senior and Milne Library intern Margaret Craft.

I’m sure when you think of Google, you think of fuzzy dogs, craigs list, and the strange questions Google helpfully fills in for you, including

and the deepest most applicable question lingering at our core:

when can you eat squirrel?

which a truly desperate college student on Geneseo’s campus might start to wonder, as the meal plan dwindles and you keep losing staring contests. (Vegans: it’s okay. Keep reading, it gets better, maybe.)

Squirrel

Day after day, eventually you start to wonder what you couldn’t eat those little buggers on. Pizza? Other squirrels?

This might require some research. For all you know, studies at Geneseo may have found a significant portion of squirrels have secret identities and should therefore be protected, not baked.

Superhero squirrel

What you, the savvy Geneseo student, would thus benefit from using is the mind-bogglingly awesome part of Google devoted to this need, sneakily hidden under products. Yes, indeed this grail of searching is none other than GOOGLE SCHOLAR, a versatile research tool that looks for your search terms in articles, patents, and book citations.

On the homepage it tries to be modest and say it only looks for articles, but it will search for books as well. Such results will appear with a [BOOK] designation at the beginning of the citation.

Once you’ve typed a search term in, such as “squirrel,” you’ll be shown a master list of all results.

Google Scholar search results

You may note that the third result on the list concerns movement representations in squirrel monkeys, which, while adorable are not a viable food source on Geneseo’s campus and thus not your concern.

To get rid of squirrel monkey results, you can exclude the word “monkey” in the advanced search. Clicking on the arrow next to the search box pulls up the advanced search functions.

Advanced search

To get rid of squirrel monkey results, you can exclude the word “monkey”:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.26.42 PM

You can further narrow results down by using the exact phrase option:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.26.34 PM

and now the top result (no superhero squirrel research in sight, sadly) based on my choice to sort by relevancy  is:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.28.08 PM

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.31.59 PMBummer. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a not so fun thing where your brain degenerates through infection by proteins called prions. Apparently it is possible to contract the disease through eating the brains of squirrels that are infected with these prions. However, when I look at more recent results by asking Google to only look for results in the last 14 years, I get this article, which is directly available for free through the link for Springer at the right:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.32.13 PM

It concludes that it is unlikely that infectious prions will appear in red squirrels. Whew. But maybe we have gray squirrels…

Underneath the citation and excerpt, you can see how many times it has been cited, none in this case, and how many websites have the full text available (All 11 versions). The link for “Related articles” at the far left will show related materials that includes others more recent than this article, these may include other types of squirrels. There is also the option to cite the article directly or save it to “my library,” which is a personalized memory bank that will keep track of citations you’re interested in.

Now the varied danger of eating squirrel brains is corroborated by another article that talks about more than just red squirrels:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.35.38 PM

It has been cited by 11 other more recent articles, which could be useful for further research into the topic. Additionally, there is no link to a free version to the right of the citation, meaning none of the 8 versions showed are available for free download. Boo.

You could cry, but wait! There should be, if you are on Geneseo’s wifi network or using an on-campus computer, a “Get It” link to the right of all articles. It may also be listed under “More” under the citation as well. This will take you to the glorious IDS request page, which should get you the article within 48 hours! REJOICE PEOPLE.

And if you are not on-campus, there is an alternative. Click “Settings” on this menu:

Google Scholar settings

What will appear is this:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.39.04 PM

Type, as I have, SUNY Geneseo and hit search.  Check the box next to “Milne Library, SUNY Geneseo – Get it”.

Now hit “Save” and you will return to your search.  Now when you look to the right of a citation, you should see the Get It next to it, or More below the citation itself.

Happy searching*!

*Just remember to research before you eat. You never know.

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.40.46 PM

*Vegans: it’s okay. Keep reading, it gets better.

Scholarship Opportunity For Education and Library Science Students

3Ts scholarship_blogWe are offering scholarships to undergraduate or graduate students to attend the upcoming 3Ts 2014: At the Core of Teaching, Technology and Transliteracy at no cost.

Conference attendees will engage in workshops where presenters highlight their dynamic teaching collaborations and/or model their instructional technique.

Workshops will include meaningful integration of technology and teaching used to support the growing number of literacies students need for learning and succeeding in today’s information-rich academic and professional worlds. It will give students the opportunity to network with educators in the field while attending workshops geared toward authentic uses of technology in the classroom.

To apply for a student scholarship:

Please complete the application form, which includes a brief essay (250-300 words) highlighting why attending the 3Ts conference will benefit your professional development and/or how the scholarship might help alleviate financial hardships.

Deadline for scholarship application is February 10, 2014
The 3Ts scholarship committee will announce awards by February 14, 2014

For further questions, contact:
Justina Elmore
Business & Data Librarian
Milne Library, SUNY Geneseo
Geneseo, NY 14454
(585) 245-5193
[email protected]

Milne Launches Scholarship & Publishing Services Website

Milne Library is pleased to announce the launch of its new Scholarship & Publishing Services website! Stop by to learn more about our recently-released books, such as Bob Dylan’s Career as a Blakean Visionary & Romantic, or journals, like our undergraduate literary magazine Gandy Dancer. You can also explore digital editions of Waldenalso launched today – filled with commentary from the world’s leading Thoreau scholars, such as Geneseo’s own Walter Harding.

Interested in publishing? Our website also includes advice on salient aspects of the publishing process such as identifying highly-ranked journals and publishers, the ins and outs of author contracts, managing data, and tips for broadening your readership.

For more information about our scholarship and publishing services, visit our website or contact your library liaison.

 

Scholarship Publishing Services Blog Promo

Where to find tax forms

Photo credit: flickr user Images_of_Money

Photo credit: flickr user Images_of_Money

It’s tax season again…  Unfortunately, real life isn’t as simple as advancing past “go” and collecting our $200. Instead, we’ll be dusting off our calculators and filling out those forms.

You can find both Federal Tax Forms and New York State Tax Forms online.

Or check out these five great places to get tax forms or file online.

Join Us to Celebrate!

GandyTicketCome celebrate the publication of Gandy Dancer, Volume 2, Issue 1 with a brunch buffet and readings by contributors.  Print copies, cool T-shirts, and mugs will be available for $10-12.

Thursday, December 12th
10 am-noon

Harding Lounge (Welles 111)

Gandy Dancer is the SUNY-wide online literary journal edited by students in English 288/Editing and Production Workshop.  Our new issue includes work from Binghamton, Geneseo, Old Westbury, Oneonta, New Paltz, Potsdam and Stony Brook.

For more information, check us out at gandydancer.org or contact Rachel Hall, faculty advisor at [email protected]

Gandy Dancer Ball

Birth of an Online Literary Journal