Latest Open SUNY Textbook Features Interactive Elements

by Cyril Oberlander

OpenSUNYTextbook-InfoLit-blogWhat makes a good researcher? When navigating today’s complex information ecosystem, researchers in any setting must have a variety of tools at their disposal, as well as the knowledge and focus to use them in an efficient and productive manner.

The authors of The Information Literacy User’s Guide have provided an essential roadmap for becoming a successful and self-aware researcher. This textbook introduces students to critical concepts of information literacy using relevant techniques and materials designed for maneuvering through an information-saturated and technology-rich world. Specifically, it utilizes two essential concepts: The Seven Pillars Model, developed by the Society of College, National, and University Libraries in the United Kingdom, as well as, the concept of information literacy as a “metaliteracy,” a model developed by Trudi Jacobson of SUNY University at Albany, and Thomas Mackey of SUNY Empire State College.

The Information Literacy User’s Guide examines information literacy as it relates to the liberal arts as well as the hard sciences. This textbook is designed for undergraduate level courses with a research component and information literacy courses, or for independent learning. The individual chapters can also be incorporated into one-shot sessions or flipped classrooms. Intelligently engaging, with relevant examples of real-life research pitfalls, case studies, and scenarios, this textbook offers many hands-on exercises and interactive quizzes to aid the progress of the audience from researching novices to capable information locators, creators, and sharers.
Available free online at: opensuny.org

About Open SUNY Textbooks

Open SUNY Textbooks is a ground-breaking open access textbook publishing initiative established by State University of New York libraries and supported by SUNY Innovative Instruction Technology Grants. This highly innovative initiative publishes high-quality, cost-effective course resources by engaging faculty as authors and peer-reviewers, and libraries as an integral part of the publishing infrastructure.

Launched in 2012, this pioneering initiative provides an opportunity for higher education to be more involved in publishing high-quality affordable textbooks. The first pilot will produce 15 published titles in 2013-2014, with 15 more titles to be published in a second pilot for 2014-2015. Participating libraries in the first pilot include SUNY Geneseo, College at Brockport, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, SUNY Fredonia, Upstate Medical University, and University at Buffalo, with support from other SUNY libraries and SUNY Press.

Lastly, with much appreciation to the authors and editors for making this textbook possible, we would also like to thank Chris Rudecoff (SUNY Morrisville), Allison Brown, Leah Root, and other members of the SUNY Geneseo Publishing Team, participating SUNY libraries, SUNY IITG grant funding, and SUNY Press for helping to make this publication a reality. Publishing open textbooks is as much about providing access to educational resources and lowering the cost of education, as it is about empowering teaching and learning, authors and readers.

For more information and to access these open textbooks, please see http://opensuny.org.

Transforming Teaching and Learning with Digital Resources

We are happy to announce a new resource available to SUNY Geneseo School of Education (SOE) students and faculty – PBS LearningMedia.  The link to the site is included in this blog and can also be found on the Education Lesson Planning library guide.

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PBS LearningMedia
PBS LearningMedia provides direct access to thousands of classroom-ready, curriculum-targeted digital resources. Resources are aligned to Common Core and national standards and include videos and interactives, as well as audio, documents, and in-depth lesson plans. The site contains free as well as *subscription-based content.

A sample from their new collection – Engaging Math Resources for Grades 5-8 – contains over 400 digital resources aligned with grades 5-8 Common Core State Standards for Mathematics and focused on critical middle school math concepts. Collection includes videos, interactives, animations, and infographics and addresses topics such as; Operations and Algebraic Thinking, Number & Operations—Fractions, The Number System, Number & Operations in Base Ten.

*You must have a SOE email address to access the subscription-based content.
Openclipart.org. (2013). Android. Retrieved from http://pixabay.com/en/android-bot-robot-television-happy-161184/

Workshop Series to help students with GREAT Day Projects

GREATday-blogParticipating in GREAT Day is a significant honor, but it can also be an intimidating experience.  A lot of work goes into papers, posters, and presentations, and students want their work to stand out in a good way.  But what is one supposed to do if he or she doesn’t know how to design a good poster or write a proper abstract?

The Center for Academic Excellence has the answer!

For the very first time, the C.A.E. is working with staff and faculty across campus to bring you a series of workshops designed for first-timers and GREAT Day veterans alike.  We already have five workshops scheduled and ready to go, and we’re working on adding a few more to the mix in the coming weeks.

So if you really want your GREAT Day project to stand out for all the right reasons, take a look at what we’re offering and start signing up!  Spaces are limited, so don’t delay!

Design Principles – February 25th, 5:15pm to 6:15pm, CU 319

Graphic design is hard.  This workshop keys in on three fundamental elements of design (spacing, color, and text) to help you draft a memorable and effective GREAT Day poster.  Taught by Kristen Fuest. Sign-Up:  http://goo.gl/AkFqV2 (limit of 24)

Abstract Writing – March 3rd, 3:30pm to 5:00pm, Milne 105

Unsure of how to write a proper abstract for your GREAT Day project?  This 90 minute workshop will help you through the process.  After some brief instruction, you will have the opportunity to write your GREAT Day abstract with guided help from some of SUNY Geneseo’s best writing tutors.  Taught by Gillian Paku and Writing Learning Center tutors. Sign-Up:  http://goo.gl/eUly1z (limit of 24)

Creating a Poster Using InDesign – March 4th, 4:30pm to 5:30pm, Milne 104

InDesign is a versatile design program you can find on pretty much every public computer on campus.  However, many SUNY Geneseo students are unfamiliar with it.  Come learn the ropes in this one-hour workshop and turn that amazing GREAT Day poster idea into a reality.  Taught by Steve Dresbach. Sign-Up:  http://goo.gl/pCpt13 (limit of 40)

Creating a Poster Using PowerPoint – March 4th, 5:45pm to 6:45pm, Milne 104

It’s not just for presentations!  When it comes to creating GREAT Day posters, PowerPoint is a friendly and familiar alternative for students who don’t necessarily want to learn a brand new program.  Taught by Steve Dresbach. Sign-Up:  http://goo.gl/QlChlH (limit of 40)

Creating a PowerPoint Presentation – April 1st, 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Milne 104

Just about all of us have used PowerPoint before, but despite your relative familiarity with the program, there’s probably a lot of really neat features you never knew about.  Learn how to make your GREAT Day presentation stand out with this sixty minute workshop.  Taught by Steve Dresbach. Sign-Up:  http://goo.gl/jYVXSG (limit of 40)

For more information on future workshops, visit www.geneseo.edu/library/cae-workshops

Beef up your teaching skills & resume!

3Ts-blogSUNY Geneseo will host the 4th Annual Transliteracy, Technology & Teaching Conference (3Ts) on Friday, March 14, 2014.  Registration is now open and we encourage those who do/will teach or train others to consider attending.

You’ll join librarians, faculty, instructional designers and K-12 educators workshops where presenters highlight their dynamic teaching collaborations and/or model their instructional technique(s).

Registration costs: $20 for professionals and $10 for students.

For more information, descriptions of conference sessions and to register, visit http://threetees.weebly.com/.

Scholarship Opportunity For Education and Library Science Students

3Ts scholarship_blogWe are offering scholarships to undergraduate or graduate students to attend the upcoming 3Ts 2014: At the Core of Teaching, Technology and Transliteracy at no cost.

Conference attendees will engage in workshops where presenters highlight their dynamic teaching collaborations and/or model their instructional technique.

Workshops will include meaningful integration of technology and teaching used to support the growing number of literacies students need for learning and succeeding in today’s information-rich academic and professional worlds. It will give students the opportunity to network with educators in the field while attending workshops geared toward authentic uses of technology in the classroom.

To apply for a student scholarship:

Please complete the application form, which includes a brief essay (250-300 words) highlighting why attending the 3Ts conference will benefit your professional development and/or how the scholarship might help alleviate financial hardships.

Deadline for scholarship application is February 10, 2014
The 3Ts scholarship committee will announce awards by February 14, 2014

For further questions, contact:
Justina Elmore
Business & Data Librarian
Milne Library, SUNY Geneseo
Geneseo, NY 14454
(585) 245-5193
[email protected]

Milne Launches Scholarship & Publishing Services Website

Milne Library is pleased to announce the launch of its new Scholarship & Publishing Services website! Stop by to learn more about our recently-released books, such as Bob Dylan’s Career as a Blakean Visionary & Romantic, or journals, like our undergraduate literary magazine Gandy Dancer. You can also explore digital editions of Waldenalso launched today – filled with commentary from the world’s leading Thoreau scholars, such as Geneseo’s own Walter Harding.

Interested in publishing? Our website also includes advice on salient aspects of the publishing process such as identifying highly-ranked journals and publishers, the ins and outs of author contracts, managing data, and tips for broadening your readership.

For more information about our scholarship and publishing services, visit our website or contact your library liaison.

 

Scholarship Publishing Services Blog Promo

Milne Library Publishes Free Open Access Resources

Milne Library publishes free open access resources; Geneseo authored works, Open SUNY Textbooks, rare books, and more on Open Access Week

Two SUNY Geneseo faculty members released open-access publications this week. Supported by the Milne Library publishing team, one is a textbook on learning the Chinese language and the other an essay on Bob Dylan. Both are accessible online free of charge to anyone. The release coincides with both International Open Access Week (a global event in support of free, immediate, online access to scholarship)  and the release of two publications developed through the Open SUNY Textbook Program, a collaboration Milne administers with SUNY libraries and faculty members to develop free online textbooks.OpenSUNYTextbooks

Geneseo Authors 

The Geneseo authors are Jasmine Tang, a lecturer in the Department of Languages and Literatures, who published the textbook Let’s Speak Chinese and Eugene Stelzig, distinguished teaching professor of English at the college, who wrote the essay Bob Dylan’s Career as a Blakean Visionary & Romantic.

Stelzig’s essay has taken a circuitous pathway to worldwide availability. He completed the work in 1976 after being invited to submit it for a volume of scholarly essays on Dylan, but the publisher backed out of the venture, deciding it would have limited appeal. Since then, faculty and students have frequently requested copies of Stelzig’s article for inclusion in dissertations or courses involving Dylan. Stelzig’s original manuscript was type written, before the advent of word processing.

“I’m delighted to participate as an open-access author and to have the essay available to anyone who wants to see it, either in print or online,” said Stelzig. “The piece has led a sort of underground life for decades in the wake of Robert Shelton listing it in the bibliography of his biography of Dylan, so I’m delighted that Milne Library is making it available and easily accessible to anyone.”

Tang has been using her textbook in her Chinese language course, which has 51 students enrolled this semester. The online version contains an audio component that allows students to listen to word pronunciations.

“The reason for open-access is such that anyone who has interest can learn the language, building confidence in making communication in Chinese at their own pace with the guidance from this book,” said Tang. “The goal is to reach a global audience and a harmonious environment in learning Chinese as a new language.”

Cyril Oberlander, library director is the principal investigator for the Open SUNY Textbook Program, developed through a SUNY Innovative Instruction Technology Grant and library funding. The program also draws upon the expertise of SUNY librarians and SUNY Press.

“It’s very gratifying to see all of these publications reach the virtual bookshelves and open to readers worldwide, the authors have my sincerest appreciation, and so do Milne’s extraordinary publishing team” said Oberlander.  These works are available from Milne’s Minerva Catalog along with 16 Genesee Valley Historical Reprints, rare titles in our Special Collections.

Open SUNY Textbooks  

The first two of 15 forthcoming Open SUNY Textbooks are now available free online worldwide. Open SUNY Textbooks will be a critical component of Open SUNY, which will expand access to online courses offered within the 64-campus system, improving completion rates among students while also offering fully-online degree opportunities. Open SUNY, which will be launched in early 2014, has the potential to be the world’s largest, most comprehensive distance-learning environment.

“Open SUNY Textbooks will dramatically cut costs for our students while enhancing the quality and efficiency of the textbooks used in some of SUNY’s most popular electives and majors, and allowing our faculty to reach a world-wide audience with their expert work,” said SUNY Chancellor Nancy L. Zimpher. “This program an exciting first-look into what Open SUNY will accomplish.”

“Digital textbooks are the future of the academic publishing world,” said Carey Hatch, SUNY associate provost for academic technologies and information services. “The average college student nationally spends $1,200 on textbooks per year, and Open SUNY Textbooks positions us to cut those costs for our students while putting them on a more direct path toward completing their degree, which is still the most effective way to save students money.”

The Open SUNY Textbook program will publish 15 books this fall on subjects such as Anthropology, Business, Computer Science, Education, English, Geological Sciences, Mathematics, Music Education, and Physics. Open SUNY Textbooks will be made available for download at www.opensuny.org.

The two books released this week are:

  • Literature, the Humanities and Humanity written by SUNY FredoniaDistinguished Teaching Professor Ted Steinberg, a professor at the college for more than 40 years. The book focuses on the reading and teaching of literature and will be used most frequently by English education majors.

“My profession has done a great job of taking literature away from people, of making it seem inaccessible. This is my answer to that,” said Dr. Steinberg. “As my career is winding down, I would like to give literature back, make people realize that they can read literature and enjoy it. I really believe in this project and the book.”

  • Native Peoples of North America written by SUNY Potsdam Professor of Anthropology Dr. Susan Stebbins. The textbook is an anthropological introduction to the Native peoples of what are now the United States and Canada, focusing on presenting both historical and contemporary information from anthropological categories such as language, kinship, economic and political organization, religion and spirituality and art.

Funded by the SUNY Innovative Instruction Technology Grant program, Open SUNY Textbooks is designed to encourage a community of practice among libraries by inviting SUNY faculty to publish open textbooks. Participants in the program also include peer reviewers, student assessors, instructional designers, and consultation from the publisher, SUNY Press.

SUNY will look to expand the program year after year, adding more titles from more SUNY campuses, and beginning to develop interactive textbooks. A catalog of forthcoming Open SUNY Textbook titles is available online.

“Studies have shown that students, at times, are not purchasing required textbooks, not registering for classes, and even dropping courses because of textbook costs,” said Cyril Oberlander, director of the SUNY Geneseo Milne Library and principal investigator of Open SUNY Textbooks. “SUNY Libraries are working with faculty to reduce costs to students, promote authorship, invest in readership, and support teaching and learning.”

Publishing student work openly: the GREAT Day Proceedings

GREATDayEvery year, GREAT Day (Geneseo Recognizing Excellence, Achievement & Talent Day) marks a college-wide symposium celebrating the creative and scholarly endeavors of our students.

For the past several years, SUNY Geneseo has published the conference proceedings of the GREAT Day presentations held every April.  The proceedings are designed to be a student-led publication, compiled and edited by a series of student editors and originally advised by Dr. E. Richie VanVliet of the Languages & Literatures department.  In 2011 the publication found a home in Milne Library when Dr. Van Vliet retired. Since the 2011 Proceedings, Milne Library has worked with two wonderful student editors, Stephanie Iasiello and Amy Bishop, to compile and edit the student work from GREAT Day presentations and poster sessions.  In the spring of every year, the Library publishes the edited proceedings of the previous year’s event.

Beginning in 2009, the Proceedings were published in print through the Amazon CreateSpace platform, and in 2011, the Proceedings were also made open access and freely available electronically through Milne’s journal publishing platform, Open Journal Systems (OJS).  http://ojs.geneseo.edu

Student submissions for the 2013 Proceedings are in the process of being reviewed  for publication — you still have time to contribute your paper!  Submitting is easy, and instructions are found on our website. Please contact the GREAT Day Proceedings journal managers (Daniel Ross, Academic Excellence Librarian [email protected] or Allison Brown, Editor & Production Manager [email protected]) for more information.

Finding statistics during the government shut-down…

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photo credit: flickr user Nick Papakyriazis

On October 1, 2013 The government shut down (again).

We’re aware of a number of assignments that require students to gather statistics from government websites like the U.S. Census Bureau and the Bureau of Economic Analysis, whose websites now post shutdown notices rather than providing access to the data usually available.

Here are a few suggestions for finding alternative sources:

1. Try using government sites that appear unaffected (at least so far) by the shutdown (i.e. bjs.gov and bls.gov are both still accessible at the time of this posting).

2. Search for state government sites that contain federal data (http://www.statelocalgov.net, http://www.globalcomputing.com/StatesContent.htm, or http://www.50states.com might be good places to start).

3. Try a Google search for the state and statistic for which you are looking (ie. GDP and California). Look for state websites among the results. If your professor will not allow you to use wikipedia, you may wish to see if wikipedia cites a source you CAN use.

4. Try finding an article (scholarly or news) that incorporates statistics you seek.

5. Ask a librarian for help at the Reference desk or use Milne Library’s IM a Librarian service (one of the library’s Multidisciplinary Databases might be a good place to start).

Scholarly Publishing across the Disciplines: Interviews with Geneseo Faculty

CostelloPeckInterviewThe Milne Library Scholarly Communications team and librarian liaisons for the campus academic departments interviewed 87 faculty members in one-on-one conversations during the academic year 2010-11 and part of academic year 2011-12.  The results of these interviews were analyzed and documented in a series of reports which will be issued over the next few months.

The interviews conducted with Geneseo faculty members were intended to be a survey of the current research and publishing practices on campus, giving us a glimpse of the issues affecting Geneseo faculty, including the changing scholarly publishing environment, digital and online scholarship, peer review, publishing with undergraduate researchers and open access.

faculty interviews wordle.SMThe first two reports in this series (both released today) document the issues and responses surrounding faculty and undergraduate students involved in research and publishing and the quickly changing environment surrounding digital scholarship and its value on campus and in the disciplines.  In particular, we look at ways in which the library may be able to meet the needs of new initiatives on campus.

To read the reports, please visit the Milne Library Scholarly Communications’ webpage at http://libguides.geneseo.edu/AcrossTheDisciplines

We welcome your feedback about the reports.  Send any comments or questions to Kate Pitcher at [email protected] or by phone at 585-245-5064.

Milne Library Scholarly Communications Team