Security Issues for Internet Explorer

IE-blogIf you use Internet Explorer, you may want to check out what CIT NewsBytes has to say about protecting yourself from the latest hacking vulnerabilities in IE.

For now, CIT recommends updating your IE browser and using IE “only for Geneseo websites that require IE. All non-Geneseo websites should be accessed with an alternate browser (Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.).”

Check the CIT NewsBytes for updates on this security issue.

Change Passwords to Avoid the Heartache of Heartbleed

HeartbleedIf you’ve been under a rock the past week, you may not be aware that many of your online accounts might have been compromised by the heartbleed bug.  The security breach is with the servers you have been logging into (e.g. Gmail, instant messaging, Facebook, Instagram, Netflix, Dropbox, etc.), so the best thing that you can do is change your passwords for those accounts sooner rather than later.

Mashable has compiled a great list of accounts that may have been affected including social networks, email providers, online shopping sites, financial institutions and more.  Bottom line, now might be a good time to update your passwords and continue to do so on a regular basis.

Geneseo’s CIT NewsBytes offers some other tips as well and will continue to update the campus on this issue.

Practical applications for Google Earth

GoogleEarthIntroduced in 2005, Google Earth is a three-dimensional virtual globe overlaid with dynamic data layers that let you explore land, oceans, moon and stars. There’s even a tour guide option that will give you historical information about significant places and events.

TrafficDataViewerGovernments and businesses are using it to make decision for location based projects by analyzing geospatial information layered by topographic, demographic, traffic data, and the like.  For example, the New York State Department of Transportation has developed a Traffic Data Viewer that uses data from the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) Database (a google earth application) to display published traffic data graphically. County administrators can use this resource to plan repaving efforts or an entrepreneur could use local traffic patterns to determine the best location to open up their new start-up.

everest-googleearthEducators are using it extensively in many different disciplines and ways, such as understanding global development, selecting and visualizing field study sites, studying land-use law and to depict the locations of many of the disputes, visualizing historical events and issues like the Trans-Atlantic slave trade routes, the underground railroad, the abolishment of slavery in Great Britain, mapping field trip routes, analyzing communication systems and so much more.

Plus, the Google Earth community is a great place to find data and can be used to explore historic grave sites, find overlays and place-marks related to Hurricane Katrina and the subsequent flooding in New Orleans, study locations of large airliner accidents, shipwrecks, World War I & II, and more.

Feel free to leave us a comment because we want to know… How have you been using Google Earth?

Earth Day 4/22/2013

WorldClimateChange

 

This year, earthday.org is focusing their theme on facing climate change.  To draw attention to the fact that climate change impacts us all, a global mosaic is being built.

Organizers are asking folks to upload photos that include a face with a sign that says “The Face of Climate Change.”  Make a difference and personalize your message to the world.

You can also take the  footprint calculator quiz to measure your ecological footprint.  The calculator measures how much land it would take to support your lifestyle based on the country’s average consumption profile.

How does the US rate as a whole?  Sadly, the gap between our ecological footprint and the planet’s biocapacity to sustain us has only widened in the past two years. So we all have a lot of work to do…

Here are a few ideas to reduce your own footprint:

  • Purchase products that use less packaging and those you do purchase should be made out of post-consumer recycled materials.
  • Take less vacations involving air travel.
  • Carpool and purchase vehicles with better fuel economyecofootprint2
  • Buy locally produced food (less packaging, trasport costs and the like mean a smaller footprint).
  • Plant a fruit/vegetable garden and compost organic materials (zero packaging or transport costs).
  • Plan the week’s meals in advance to cut down on food waste, trips to the market and impulse buying.
  • Buy second-hand items and donate or sell your unwanted appliances, clothes, books and furniture.
  • Lower your thermostat by 4 degrees (and program it to stay low!)
  • Recycle (list of recyclables from the EPA).
  • Use the green option from your public utilities provider.

Here are even more ideas for living green.

Infographics Get A Second Wind

Info-ArtToolsInfographics have been around for centuries, from ancient cave paintings  to modern subway maps to (probably the most recognizable infograph of all time) the Periodic Table published back in 1869.

Recently, infographics and info-art have gotten a second wind.  Data visualization has have become a popular trend for folks who want to quickly and easily present complex information.  It’s no wonder since we live in an age where data is being produced at exponential rates.  In fact, Google executives estimate that every two days, we create as much data as we did between the “dawn of time through 2003.”  Every two days!  Much of this is generated from social media such as Facebook, Twitter, Four Square and the InfographDisplaylike.

The increasing number of easy-to-use tools available has also made it easier for those without a degree in design to generate creative infographics; and to share them with the masses via social media.

Here’s a few tools that you might try:

Piktochart visual.ly Tagxedo
Wordle easel.ly Many Eyes
  Stat Planet by Stat Silk  infogr.am  creately

Find even more tools on our Census & Data Library Guide.

An Irish March…

clover-flagSt. Patrick’s Day
Originally a religious holiday to honor St. Patrick, who introduced Christianity to Ireland in the fifth century, St. Patrick’s Day has evolved into a celebration for all things Irish.

The world’s first St. Patrick’s Day parade occurred on March 17, 1762, in New York City, featuring Irish soldiers serving in the English military. This parade became an annual event, with President Truman attending in 1948.

Did you know March is also Irish-American Heritage Month?

Congress first proclaimed March as Irish-American Heritage Month in 1991, and the president issues a proclamation commemorating the occasion each year.

St Patrick’s Day Infographic of the day…

St. Patrick�s Day By The Numbers

St. Patrick’s Day By the Numbers. (2013). The History Channel website. Retrieved 11:26, March 6, 2013, from http://www.history.com/interactives/st-patricks-day-by-the-numbers.

 

First Commercial Spacecraft to Dock with ISS

History will be made this week as the first commercial spacecraft, the SpaceX Dragon, docks with and delivers supplies and a thousand pounds of science experiments to the International Space Station.

This is the beginning of a new era in U.S. Space flight. The NASA space shuttle fleet was decommissioned as of July 21, 2011.  Over it’s 30 years in operation, the fleet of five shuttles “flew 542 million miles, circled Earth 21,152 times, carried 355 people from 16 countries and spent a combined 1,333 days in space – nearly four years” (Dunn, 2011, p. 1A).

The Dragon launched last Sunday, October 7 and this will the first supply mission by the U.S. since Space Shuttle Atlantis made the trip in July 2011.

Sources:
Dunn, Marcia. (July 22, 2011). NASA’S space shuttle program – 1981-2011; Final flight; Atlantis’ smooth landing marks end of shuttle program. Charleston Gazette. Retrieved from Lexis-Nexis Academic 8 Oct. 2012.

Dunn, Marcia. (October 8, 2012). SpaceX dragon capsule launched to space station. ABC 
News: Tech This Out. Retrieved 8 Oct. 2012.