How to Get Registered; Do It By Oct. 14th!

registeredRegister to Vote in the General Election by Oct. 14

Unless you have been living under a rock, you probably have heard the political attacks going back and forth between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Yes, it’s that magical time that arrives every four years – the general election! The general election is held on November 8, 2016. In this election, United States Citizens vote for more than just the President of the United States, they also vote for senators, seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, and more. Regardless of your opinion of the candidates or political orientation, voting is a civic responsibility and the outcome has a great impact on our society.

Who Can Vote?

If you are a legal U.S. citizen who will be 18 years of age by November 8, 2016, then you can register to vote.  However, you must be registered by October 14, 2016. You may print and mail in your voter registration or may register to vote online.

Residency Consideration

suffrageparade-in-ny-loc

Suffrage parade in New York, May 6, 1912. United States Library of Congress’s Prints and Photographs division. Public domain.

Students may establish voting residency in the place they consider their principal home, whether that be their current school address or at another address (such as a guardian’s address) they consider their primary residence (Brennan Center, 2016). If you have not declared Geneseo as your primary residence on your voter registration, then you need to apply for an absentee voting ballot.

register here

Image by Tony Webster from Portland, Oregon, United States. CC Attribution.

Absentee Voting

“Voters in New York must have an accepted reason to vote absentee, including the inability to vote in person due to physical disability or absence from the county in which one is registered (if a resident of New York City, then absence from the city), among others. Voters may submit their application for an absentee ballot by mail (postmarked) seven days before Election Day (2016: November 1) or in person by the end of the day before Election Day (2016: November 7). Completed ballots may be submitted in person by the close of polls on Election Day or by mail such that the ballot is postmarked by the day before the election (2016: November 7) and received within seven days of the election” (Brennan Center, 2016).

New York Board of Elections Absentee Ballot

Have Questions or Need Help?

Stop by the Milne Library Research Help Desk and a reference librarian will be happy to assist you.

References: 

Brennan Center for Justice. (2016). Student voting guide 2016. Retrieved from
http://www.brennancenter.org/how-vote-2016 

Written by Brandon West.

 

registereddeadline

Igniting a passion for STEM with rich and engaging resources

STEM

Image credit: FlickrUser natàlia i xavier de Lu2

Are you interested in learning more about STEM activities and resources. Would you like to explore ways to incorporate STEM across the curriculum with the goal of building student understanding?

Connecting hands-on STEM activities with books, games or manipulatives can be a great way to strengthen understanding and literacy skills while inspiring inquiry and creativity.

Milne Library has recently acquired a collection of STEM books, games, and manipulatives. These high quality resources illustrate activities that encourage scientific and artistic creativity and help increase student learning.

A few items found in the collection include:

Books
Getting the most out of makerspaces to create with 3-D printers by Nicki Peter Petrikowski
High-tech DIY projects with 3D printing by Maggie Murphy
Lego awesome ideas by Daniel Lipkowitz
STEM to story: enthralling and effective lesson plans for grades 5-8 by Jennifer Traig

Manipulatives
Hands-on soft geometric solids
Molymod organic teacher set
Lego Education. Duplo: Animal bingo kit
STEM: simple machines STEM activity set

Games
Ion: a compound building game by John J. Coveyou
Prime climb: the beautiful, colorful, mathematical game
Pandemic by Matt Leacock

To learn more about STEM resources contact the Education Librarian, Michelle Costello ([email protected]).

In addition, read the following Education Update article by ASCD, “Teaching and Learning Resources for STEM Education.”

Presenting … Allison Brown, Milne’s Digital Publishing Services Manager

BrownAIt’s official — Allison Brown is Milne library’s new Digital Publishing Services Manager.  Allison was the successful candidate in last summer’s nationwide search to fill the newly-created position, bringing with her a proven track record of working with authors, navigating the publishing landscape, and producing a variety of publications.

Before you scratch your head too vigorously, wondering “But hasn’t Allison been here, doing that, long before this past summer?” — yes, she had been functioning as the digital publishing coordinator here in a temporary capacity for several years, and was instrumental in helping Milne build its publishing services from the ground up. The early projects, going back to 2012, include the Genesee Valley Historical Reprints Series (33 titles); Stuart Symington’s memoir, Tagging Along; and the first Proceedings of GREAT Day.

OpenSUNYTextbooksSince then, Allison has continued to produce more from Milne’s “press,” working closely with student groups, faculty, and emeriti at Geneseo and throughout SUNY. Among the current and ongoing projects she’s involved in is Open SUNY Textbooks,  for which she is project manager — working closely with authors and coordinating peer review, editing, and GDProceedingspublishing. She also continues to assist with production of the Proceedings of GREAT Day as well as advise for and coordinate publication of Gandy Dancer, the Geneseo-based, SUNY-wide student literary magazine edited by SUNY Geneseo students. With Gandy Dancer, Allison works closely with English professor Rachel Hall’s Editing & Production Workshop classes, both in and out of the classroom.

As Digital Publishing Services Manager, Allison manages to offer both publication assistance (production, project management, software training, etc.) to authors and experiential learning to the interns with whom she regularly works. She expects both areas to grow as more authors explore alternative publishing options, including open access (OA) publications and digital projects, and more students seek help with producing and managing their publications.

Allison earned a B.A. in English from Houghton College and an M.F.A. in creative writing from Emerson College in Boston. Prior to coming to Milne Library, she worked at Boston College’s library as a circulation desk assistant. Allison is an avid consumer of audio books since, she says, she seems to spend a lot of time in her car (much of it driving between her home in Rochester and work in Geneseo), and listening is a good way to use that time.

You can find Allison in her office (Milne 108) on the Library’s lower level, or contact her at [email protected] or 585-245-6020.

Lesson Plans: Resources to Engage Students and Enhance Learning

MichellePostIt can be difficult to find the right website to use in lesson planning, specifically one that contains videos, activities, games or other engaging material. I am highlighting three that stand out: two because of their high-quality content & their alignment w/the Common Core (BrainPop & PBS LearningMedia), & one that specializes in hard-to-find educational videos (Kanopy Streaming Video).

These media resources are helpful to use while creating lesson plans for your classes and for use with students in the classroom. In addition to containing subject and topic specific videos, they are also rich in lesson planning and activity ideas, many aligned to the common core.

BrainPOP creates animated, curriculum-based content. Resources include: movies, quizzes, games, mobile apps, experiments, activity pages, and much more covering hundreds of topics within Math, Science, Social Studies, English, Technology, Arts & Music, and Health. All content is aligned to and searchable by state standards including Common Core.

PBS LearningMedia provides access to thousands of classroom-ready, curriculum-targeted digital resources. Resources are aligned to Common Core and national standards and include videos and interactives, as well as audio, documents, and in-depth lesson plans. You can browse by standards, grade level, subject area, and special collections.  You must be a SOE faculty member or student to access this resource. Please contact me if you have issues accessing the site.

Kanopy Streaming Video is an on-demand streaming video service for educational institutions that provides access to more than 26,000 films. Over 80 subject areas range from Global Studies & Languages to the Arts, to Education (K-12); Technical Training to Career Development to LGBT.

For more media resource ideas, visit the Education Lesson Planning guide, or contact the Education Librarian, Michelle Costello, directly at [email protected]

Brandon West, Our New Social Science Librarian

BWestMilne Library is excited to welcome Brandon West as our new Social Sciences Reference & Instruction Librarian. Brandon joins us from SUNY Oswego where he was the Online Instruction/Instructional Design Librarian. In addition to teaching information literacy classes he used his extensive knowledge of online teaching and learning, instructional design and pedagogy to help faculty and staff develop and deliver both in-person and online courses.

Here at Geneseo, Brandon will be the liaison to the Anthropology, Psychology, Sociology, and Political Science Departments, and will work closely with faculty, students, and staff to help them with their information literacy, research, and collection development needs.

Prior to working in an academic environment, Brandon worked at the Grand Rapids Public Library in Grand Rapids, MI; he is also a former elementary school teacher, having been a fourth grade teacher in Charleston, SC.

Brandon received his B.A. at Grand Valley State University in English and Elementary Education, his M.Ed. from Grand Valley State University in Educational Technology, and his M.L.S. from Texas Woman’s University. As a life-long learner, he is currently pursuing a Certificate of Graduate Study in Online Learning and Teaching from the University at Albany.

In Brandon’s spare time he is the member of many national library committees and teams, such as the ACRL Instruction Session Teaching Methods Committee, the ALA GLBT Round Table, and he co-chairs the ACRL Distance Learning Section Awards Committee. In his spare, spare time he enjoys traveling, taste testing new restaurants, and parenting his two cat children.

Center for Academic Excellence – Fall 2014 Updates

CAEBlogOn behalf of everyone working with the Center for Academic Excellence, welcome back to campus everyone! And for those of you who are new, we look forward to meeting and serving you over the course of the next several years!

The C.A.E. is slated to  resume services on September 8th. As in years past, we will be hosting the Writing Learning Center, AOP tutoring, International Student & Scholar Services tutoring, and other educational services.

In addition to these services, the C.A.E. will also be sponsoring an expanded number of workshops this year, including:

  • Library instruction for transfer students
  • Library instruction for international students
  • Time management
  • Resource evaluation
  • Annotated bibliographies…

…and many more. You’ll be hearing more about our workshop offerings, including dates and times, very shortly.

Also, save the date! The C.A.E. Open House will be returning to the main floor of the Milne Library on September 24th from 4:00pm to 6:00pm. We’ll be sharing information about various tutoring and learning centers, and recognizing all the hard work done by your peer tutors across campus.

Stay tuned for more information in the coming weeks!

Why use Primary Sources?

A Primary source is material created at the time of an historical event and provides a true account of that event or time period. They are a great way to expose students to multiple perspectives on past and present events and issues.

Identifying and finding primary sources can be a challenge, however, which may dissuade students from using them in their research. The video below, designed by librarians Sue Ann Brainard and Michelle Costello, introduces the plight of the Little Rock Nine and their integration struggles through the use of primary sources, such as images, oral histories, government documents and music.

Sue Ann Brainard – [email protected]

Michelle Costello – [email protected]

LittleRock9

Evenings at Milne Library Receive Consistent Research Support

Our new Academic Excellence Librarian, Daniel RossWhile Milne Library welcomes Daniel Ross as our newest librarian, the Center for Academic Excellence (CAE) gains essential research coverage in the evenings. The newly created position of Academic Excellence Librarian provides a true win-win situation – both the library and the CAE benefit from evening supervision, extended and dedicated research assistance, and fresh eyes to work on developing programs that bring together all support services offered by the CAE.

Daniel Ross is no stranger to working late night hours at Milne Library – first as a SUNY Geneseo history student (Class of 2009) and then as our most recent part-time Evening/Weekend Manager during Spring 2013. After graduating from Geneseo, Dan completed an MLIS (Master of Library & Information Science) at Drexel University and has now returned to the Rochester area to build his professional career.

As the support services in the CAE –

– continue to grow and strengthen, the development of an Academic Excellence Librarian position seemed the perfect fit to more cohesively tie the CAE together as one unit.  This can be done through evening oversight of the center, marketing and development of center-based workshops, and compilation of usage statistics (i.e., how, when and why students are using the center). To this end, Dan Ross brings fresh ideas, organizational skills, and a solid understanding of what it means to be a Geneseo student.

Dan began his position on September 12 and we are excited to (re) introduce him to the college community.

Milne Librarians, Published!

LILACCongratulations to Milne Librarians, Kim Hoffman and Michelle Costello on the recent publication of their article,

Davies-Hoffman, K., Alvarez, B., Costello, M., & Emerson, D. (2013). Keeping pace with information literacy instruction for the real world: When will MLS programs wake up and smell the LILACs? Communications in Information Literacy, 7 (1), 9-23.

Communications in Information Literacy is a peer-reviewed, open access journal dedicated to advancing knowledge, theory, and research in information literacy.

Conceiving and implementing LILAC (not just once, but twice! as well as inspiring several similar programs) and now publishing to advocate change in the education of future librarians; they’re making an impact! Nice work, ladies!

Curious about the Library Instruction Leadership Academy (LILAC)? You can take a look at the “greatest hits” video from the most recent series to get an idea of how it has impacted the latest group of librarians in the program. You can also learn about the first series in an earlier blog post from 2010.

And let’s not forget that in 2011, The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) selected Kim and Michelle to receive its Instruction Section (IS) Innovation award for their work in developing LILAC.

When you check out the article, also be sure to look for comments from Alyse Hennig, Geneseo-grad-turned-Librarian too!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LILAC II

In collaboration with the Rochester Regional Library Council and many, many librarian volunteers throughout the Western and Central New York State area, Milne Library is thrilled to announce the kick off of the second Library Instruction Leadership Academy (LILAC).  The first program, envisioned by Milne librarians Michelle Costello and Kim Davies-Hoffman, was offered in Spring 2010 with 11 participants – librarians who were new to classroom instruction and who desired a more effective and engaging teaching approach.

This year’s LILAC has attracted many more applicants but could only accommodate for its current 21 students.  Participants hail from Buffalo, Alfred, Rochester and Syracuse and the types of libraries where they work is just as diverse – the Adam Mickiewicz Library & Dramatic Circle (the oldest surviving Polish library in Buffalo, NY), the Business Career Management Center at University of Rochester’s Simon School, the Scottsville Free Public Library and SUNY’s Upstate Health Sciences Library, just to name a few.

An additional highlight to the exciting array of students is the inclusion of three recent SUNY Geneseo graduates who have gone on to pursue a Masters in Library Science – Bonnie Archer (‘07, English Literature), Maura Proctor (‘04, History, Honors Program), and Chad Taylor (‘99, Philosophy with English and Medieval Studies minors).

While serving different age groups, populations and special interests, all 21 LILAC participants have one thing in common – the desire to become better teachers.  They started on this path by attending 1) the January 24 kick-off celebration where they were able to become acquainted with the expectations of the LILAC program and meet like-minded librarians in their cohort and 2) the first two full-day workshop which took place on January 28 and February 27.

SUNY Geneseo Education professor, Dr. Brian Morgan*, led the foundational workshop for the academy which focused on pedagogical theory and how to translate that into effective teaching practice.  The intention of LILAC is that subsequent presenters will address and emulate the theory-to-practice model, as introduced by Dr. Morgan and through their own workshop delivery. *

To prepare LILAC students for their next workshop session, Teaching with Technology (March 27),  the academy planning team has immersed them in educational technology.  Pre-workshop, the students joined in a discussion around learning new technologies via Voicethread, during the session, students will choose a chat room (from a choice of three learning management system [LMS] platforms) where they will engage in creating a new learning (digital) asset, and then come together for a larger group discussion in Blackboard’s Collaborate.  The LILAC LMS, Moodle, will provide the traditional text-based discussion forum for students to reflect, share ideas and ask questions post-workshop.

LILAC will run through June 2013 with a total five full-day workshops; observations of librarians’ teaching; outside (online) reading assignments, reflections and student discussions; and a final mini-presentation that demonstrates improved teaching practice.

Already recognized nationally by the ACRL Instruction Section Innovation Award, LILAC organizers are hopeful of similar success for their participants in 2013.  We are also pleased to announce the upcoming publication, “Keeping pace with information literacy instruction for the real world: When will MLS programs wake up and smell the LILACs?” in the online, open access journal Communications in Information Literacy. The u

ltimate goal in writing this piece is to gradually transform graduate-level curriculum in Library and Information Science programs across the country.

Claud1

Ms. Jane Mannheim Claud, Geneseo ‘69

* The inclusion of a Master Instructor with expertise in pedagogical theory and practice was made possible by a generous donation from Ms. Jane Mannheim Claud, Geneseo ‘69.