Wave Machines, Puppets, and a Scavenger Hunt: The Perfect Field Trip!

On Friday, March 27, SUNY Geneseo was host to four 3rd graders and their teachers from the Genesee Valley BOCES program. The purpose of the visit was to introduce the students (all on the Autism Spectrum) to the idea of attending college and for them to experience the life of a college student (at least for one day). Each of the visiting students was paired up with a Geneseo School of Education student, who served  as their “buddy” for the day. The following is a write-up from one of the buddys.
miranda2“…I was able to spend the morning and afternoon with four great students from the BOCES program. My buddy for the day was a third grader named Makayla. We spent the morning looking at the wave machine in the Science building at Geneseo and seeing the cool things that happened when waves caused erosion on a shoreline! At lunch Makayla and I sat together with another student, Landon, and his college-buddy. They were telling us all about themselves including their pets and siblings and even what they have learned in school this year (they were especially excited to tell us about their fraction knowledge).  Makayla was full of questions about college and was really interested with the fact that we lived here as well as went to school! We next got to have some fun running around campus during our scavenge hunt. Makayla was especially excited about finding a colorful piano in the College Union, and even started to play some notes! When we finally arrived at our last location, the library, there were prizes waiting for the students. Makayla was really excited about her prizes and showed them off all around! It was a great time to read with her and see her interest in all the different books and puppets she could look at and use in the library. Overall it was a great day filled with lots of fun and excitement!”

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This was an amazing experience, not only for the 3rd graders but for the Geneseo students (and staff) as well! We hope that this is just the first in many such opportunities.

The Imaginarium: A creative Space for SOE Students

The Imaginarium is an open space located in Milne Library on the Lower Level. It is place where School of Education students have access to a wide variety of materials and resources that help them to create dynamic lessons, displays, bulletin boards, models and many more projects.

imaginarium-collageThe Imaginarium helps students connect manipulatives and other additive resources such as, games, textbooks, and videos to their lessons and assignments to create more exciting and lively projects and presentations.

The Imaginarium is also available to clubs, organizations, and the community to use along side the wide variety of materials in the TERC collection, including lots of fiction and non-fiction children books, games, and puppets.

Office hours are on Monday and Wednesday from 7pm-9pm. Please feel free to stop by with questions or help you need with upcoming projects! In addition send an email directly to the Imaginarium curator, Miranda ([email protected]) or Education Librarian, Michelle Costello ([email protected]).

Where to find tax forms?

Photo credit: flickr user Images_of_Money

Photo credit: flickr user Images_of_Money

It’s tax season again…  Unfortunately, real life isn’t as simple as advancing past “go” and collecting our $200. Instead, we’ll be dusting off our calculators and filling out those forms.

You can find both Federal Tax Forms and New York State Tax Forms online.

Or check out these five great places to get tax forms or file online.

New Access to Experian’s Credit Data Reports

business_research-400x300Our ABI/INFORM database now has access to the Experian Commercial Risk Database, containing over 40 million credit data reports for both private and public companies, allowing researchers to see details such as contact information, size, industry, MSA, sales range, business type, bankruptcy information, credit risk, and more. These reports are full-text with coverage from December 10, 1980 to the present.

ABI/INFORM can be found under recommended databases on both the Business/Economics and Accounting/Auditing library research guides.

To find these reports, search ABI/INFORM for a company (e.g.“Ford Motor company”), then limit to reports (or limit further to just experian reports under publication title).

FindingExperianReports_ABI-INFORM

For more info on the new content, see the announcement on ProQuest’s blog.

Picture Perfect! Teaching with Picture Books

picturebooksThe adage “A picture is worth a thousand words” rings especially true when talking about picture books. Anyone who has browsed through bookstore or library shelves can attest to the fact that a compelling photo or illustration on the cover may entice us to pick up a rather dull sounding book. We may ask ourselves “Why is there a skull and crossbones on the cover”, or “what is that woman thinking, swimming with that shark?”

In addition to making texts more appealing the artwork in picture books can make it easier for readers to make sense of the accompanying (sometimes complex) text. This can be particularly helpful to classroom teachers who are looking for ways to introduce complicated or controversial topics to their students.

Milne Library has a large collection of picture books on various subjects and themes such as: geometry, human impact on the earth, disabilities, grief, and acceptance. Using picture books to introduce these topics can help both the teacher (making it easier to cover difficult to understand content) and the students (may engage them with content they normally wouldn’t choose).

All children’s picture books are located on the lower level of the library in the Teacher Education Resource Center (TERC). A few new titles, with summaries (from the catalog/book jacket), are listed below. For help on locating these books visit this site or contact the education librarian, Michelle Costello ([email protected]).

Titles:

  • Bats on Parade by Kathi Appelt — “On a midsummer’s night the Marching Bat Band makes a rare appearance, its members grouped in formations that demonstrate multiplication from two times two up to ten times ten.”
  • A Boy and a Jaguar by Alan Rabinowitz — “The renowned cat conservationist reflects on his early childhood struggles with a speech disorder, describing how he only spoke fluently when he was communicating with animals and how he resolved at a young age to find his voice to be their advocate.”
  • Cloud Spinner by — Michael Catchpool “When the king orders a boy to make him a huge wardrobe out of the clouds in the sky, the boy warns him that it is more than he needs but the king does not listen.”
  • Half a World Away by Libby Gleeson — “When Louie’s best friend Amy moves to the other side of the world, Louie must find a way to reconnect with her.”
  • House Held Up by Trees by Ted Kooser– “Built on a treeless yard by a family who cleared away all the sprouting trees on the property, a house is eventually abandoned and left to deteriorate on a lot that is gradually overrun by wild trees, in a poignant tale of loss, change, and nature’s quiet triumph.”
  • Same, Same, but Different by Jenny Sue Kostecki-Shaw — “Pen pals Elliot and Kailash discover that even though they live in different countries–America and India–they both love to climb trees, have pets, and ride a school bus.”
  • The Tin Forest by Helen Ward– “An old man’s persistent dreams transform a garbage dump into a forest full of life.”
  • Varmints. Part One by Helen Ward & Marc Craste — “When tall buildings and loud noise drown out the sounds of bees in the grass and birds in the sky, one soul cares enough to start over again and help nature thrive.”

 

8th Edition of Turabian

turabianHold the presses! Students writing papers using Turabian citation style (and the faculty grading such papers) should be aware that there are changes in the conventions recommended by the new edition of the Turabian manual.

The devil is in the details. The 8th edition of A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations (commonly knows as Turabian) was published in March 2013. Some of the changes involve how you cite web pages and articles you read online. For instance, the new edition flips the URL of a web page with the access date.

The older editions have you doing it like this:

“Breast Cancer Disparities.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/DataStatistics (accessed December 6, 2013).

But the new 8th edition recommends this:

“Breast Cancer Disparities.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Accessed December 6, 2013. http://www.cdc.gov/DataStatistics.

Small change, but one that could elicit points off if the student doesn’t know the new form (or might cause the professor who doesn’t know the new form to grade incorrectly).

Another change involves the use of DOIs (digital object identifiers) instead of URLs when citing a journal article read online, or a web page. DOI’s are more stable than URLs, and usually shorter. Another 8th edition recommendation: “If no suitably short and direct URL exists, you may substitute the name of the database for the URL.” So if you have a URL or DOI, you do not need the name of the database.

Talk about it with your professor! Keep in mind that there are many professors who deviate from the Turabian manual in the way they want you to cite an article that you read in PDF form. They feel that if you read a journal article as a PDF (either downloaded from the web or via IDS), you can cite it as though you read it in print, since it is an exact copy of what appeared in the journal. There are many optional recommendations in the Turabian manual (for instance, there is a chapter recommending an author-date style of citation reminiscent of the APA and MLA style manuals), so it is really important that students and professors talk about exactly which chapters of the Turabian manual should be followed!

Short cuts don’t always work. Many citation generators or online citation guides still have not updated to the new 8th edition changes, so be wary when using “Cite This!” in a database or citation manager. And don’t forget, you can always stop at the Reference desk to ask a librarian for assistance with your citations.  “A Review of Turabian 8th Edition Changes from Turabian 7th Edition”Turabian Quick Guide 

Changes to NOVELNY subscription databases

NovelNYNOVELNY has replaced the databases Primary Search, Searchasaurus, and Kids’ Search with Kids InfoBits, and eLibrary Elementary.

infobitsKids InfoBits is a database created for students in Kindergarten through Grade 5. “It features a developmentally appropriate, visually graphic interface, a subject-based topic tree search and full-text, age-appropriate, curriculum-related magazine, newspaper and reference content for information on current events, the arts, science, health, people, government, history, sports and more” (Kids InfoBits, 2013).

For information on how to use this site visit the following tutorials:

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eLibELE_AnimWIDEeLibrary Elementary is “the ultimate elementary full-text reference resource — tailors all the media types and search functionality of eLibrary for the young reader and researcher. It’s an easy-to-use general reference database designed specifically to engage and guide younger students” (eLibrary Elementary, 2013).

For information on how to use this database visit the following tutorial

eLibrary Elementary [online image]. (2013). Retrieved August 22, 2013, http://www.proquestk12.com/productinfo/elibrary.shtml
eLibrary Elementary (2013). Retrieved from http://www.proquestk12.com/productinfo/elibrary_elementary.shtml
Kids InfoBits [online image]. (2013). Retrieved August 22, 2013, http://galesupport.com/novelny/#
Kids InfoBits (2013). Retrieved from http://www.gale.cengage.com/InfoBits/

“How Do I …” save time and frustration with research projects!

HowDoISo you’re new to campus and kinda new to the whole research paper thing.  Or you’re not new but just a bit rusty, and that library skills class you took seems so long ago.  Who can remember all that searching/citing/writing stuff anyway?

Just settle down, breathe deeply, turn on your computer, and bring up Milne Library’s homepage.  See that list over there on the right, called Quick Links?  About half way down is the one you want – “How do I …

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Click on it and you’ll find all you need to help you through your research project, no matter which stage it’s at. Just about everything is covered, from “Begin My Research” to “Edit and Proofread My Writing.”   Need help distinguishing scholarly from popular (or primary from secondary) sources?  There’s a guide for that! Need some guidance on which databases to use, and how to do a really great search? Yep – there’s a guide for that, too.

When asking a librarian is just not an option – whether because it’s 2 a.m. and you need help NOW, or because you’re more of a DIYer – Milne’s “How do I …” guides will help see you through the research, citing, and writing of your paper or project.  (But do try to ask a librarian, too, OK?)Start

Milne Library textbook resources

With the Fall semester right around the corner, it’s time again to go textbook shopping. If you have a tight budget, Milne Library may be able to help you access your required textbooks.

Textbooks on Reserve Collection

Milne Library has a growing collection of textbooks available for 4 hour loan. You can easily search the collection from our Find Textbooks and Course Reserves library guide. If the textbook is available in our collection, just drop by the Service Desk to request it. (Note: you can only check out one textbook at a time.)

Information Delivery Services (IDS)

If Milne Library does not own the textbook you need, you can request a copy through Information Delivery Services. If we are able to find another library that can lend us a copy, then we will borrow it via interlibrary loan. Please be advised that most interlibrary loan books can only be borrowed for 4-6 weeks and renewals are not guaranteed. As a result, this is not the ideal way to access a textbook you’ll need for the entire semester.

We highly recommend that you allow 2-4 weeks for us to find a lending library for textbooks. Because textbooks are in high demand (and because many libraries will not lend them through interlibrary loan), it can take longer than usual to borrow them. (Note: if a book is located in our Textbooks on Reserve Collection, we will not borrow it from another library.)

 

 

 

Data: What Do YOU Need in our Collection?

ScipioneCensusLecture

Paul Scipione talks about his mentor and friend Dr. George Gallup, well know for developing the Gallup opinion poll.

The library held a successful Celebration of Data event last Wednesday (April 24, 2013) where Professor Emeritus Paul Scipione gave a lecture on the value of census data.

“Looking at census information, you are able to see not just statistics, but that there are stories in there…”.  The data provides “the very story of the United States,” giving us a historical picture of when Americans became affluent enough to afford a family car, televisions, college degrees or their own homes.  Scipione tells us how businesses saw the value of census information for market research and how technological advances impacted what and how much information could be collected and offered by the Census Bureau.  For more, watch the lecture online.

The event was part of the 2013 International Year of Statistics, an initiative of over 1900 participating organizations from all over the world who are holding events to celebrate data and promote the importance of statistics.

But we don’t want the conversations to end there!

DataQuestionMark1

Tell us, what are your data needs?

It is most fitting that during this year of statistics, Milne is developing a census and data collection for Geneseo.  The purpose of the collection is to provide student, staff and faculty researchers easy access to data; and to provide area entrepreneurs and small businesses access to economic and demographic data for market research.

This collection will be most useful if folks like you have a hand in its development.  Let us know what resources you need in this collection.