Pilot: What is VoiceThread? We Need Your Help!

VThreadAre you looking for new ways to engage students? SUNY Geneseo is piloting a trial of VoiceThread and needs your feedback.

VoiceThread is an interactive collaborative learning tool that can be used to enhance student engagement outside of the classroom or in online environments. With VoiceThread, instructors and/or students can create, share, and comment on images, PowerPoint presentations, videos, audio files, documents, and PDFs using microphone, webcam, text, phone, and audio-file upload. At SUNY Geneseo, VoiceThread is an external tool that integrates into myCourses.

VoiceThread can be used in many different ways to enhance classroom learning experiences. Use it for flipping instruction, discussions outside of class, critiquing work, remediation, or practicing language skills.

A couple of examples to consider (more below):

Accessing VoiceThread

You may access VoiceThread in two ways: in myCourses and through Geneseo’s VoiceThread Website.

myCourses access:  Adding VoiceThread to your course

  • Navigate to your course.
  • Click “Add Content”.
  • Select “External Tool”.
  • Give the activity a title.
  • For tool provider, select “VoiceThread”.
  • Check the box that says “Enable grading”.
  • Save changes.

For more information on how to create your first thread visit – https://voicethread.com/howto/angel/

 

Geneseo VoiceThread Website:

Faculty and students are also able to create a Voicethread without using Angel, visit https://geneseo.voicethread.com and register with a geneseo.edu email account.

 

VoiceThread Support Team:

If you would like to learn more about VoiceThread or want assistance setting it up for your course, contact:

Brandon West: [email protected]

Michelle Costello: [email protected]

 

Additional Links

Learn more about VoiceThread’s Features:

Additional Examples of VoiceThread in the Higher Ed Classroom:

 

Check it out: Hamlet curriculum guide

HamletThe Scout Report recommends this useful resource:

This Hamlet curriculum guide, assembled by the Folger Shakespeare Library, provides a substantial array of teacher resources. Here educators will find a synopsis of the play, an overview of the characters in graphic form, tips for teaching Shakespeare, a series of helpful frequently asked questions about teaching the Bard, two full Lesson Plans with handouts, and a page of short quotes from the play. The lesson plans, especially, provide a creative take on the classic text. One investigates Hamlet’s central dilemmas (the death of his father, the remarriage of his mother, and his inability to act). The second uses music to explore Shakespeare’s characters. [CNH]

Lesson Plans: Resources to Engage Students and Enhance Learning

MichellePostIt can be difficult to find the right website to use in lesson planning, specifically one that contains videos, activities, games or other engaging material. I am highlighting three that stand out: two because of their high-quality content & their alignment w/the Common Core (BrainPop & PBS LearningMedia), & one that specializes in hard-to-find educational videos (Kanopy Streaming Video).

These media resources are helpful to use while creating lesson plans for your classes and for use with students in the classroom. In addition to containing subject and topic specific videos, they are also rich in lesson planning and activity ideas, many aligned to the common core.

BrainPOP creates animated, curriculum-based content. Resources include: movies, quizzes, games, mobile apps, experiments, activity pages, and much more covering hundreds of topics within Math, Science, Social Studies, English, Technology, Arts & Music, and Health. All content is aligned to and searchable by state standards including Common Core.

PBS LearningMedia provides access to thousands of classroom-ready, curriculum-targeted digital resources. Resources are aligned to Common Core and national standards and include videos and interactives, as well as audio, documents, and in-depth lesson plans. You can browse by standards, grade level, subject area, and special collections.  You must be a SOE faculty member or student to access this resource. Please contact me if you have issues accessing the site.

Kanopy Streaming Video is an on-demand streaming video service for educational institutions that provides access to more than 26,000 films. Over 80 subject areas range from Global Studies & Languages to the Arts, to Education (K-12); Technical Training to Career Development to LGBT.

For more media resource ideas, visit the Education Lesson Planning guide, or contact the Education Librarian, Michelle Costello, directly at [email protected]

Kanopy Streaming Video

KanopyHere’s a new resource to get excited about!

Milne library has recently acquired Kanopy; an on-demand streaming video service for educational institutions that provides access to more than 26,000 films. Over 80 subject areas range from Global Studies & Languages to the Arts, to Education (K-12); Technical Training to Career Development to LGBT.

Kanopy works directly with filmmakers and film distribution companies to offer award-winning collections including titles from PBS, BBC, Criterion Collection, Media Education Foundation and more.

KanGuide

The site is pretty intuitive, but we’ve put together a guide that explains not only how to use the resource, but also how faculty might embed materials into myCourses for their classes, as well as pointing out features like transcripts and playlists.

Take it for a spin and let us know what your experience is. Is this something you’ll use? We want to know!

Government Documents Are Moving Back to Milne

GDocsCollectionThis summer, the library is moving our government documents back to Milne in preparation for building renovations in Fraser. The loss of the space in Fraser gave us opportunity to work with faculty across several disciplines in a re-evaluation of this collection. “We know that there just isn’t enough space to bring everything back to Milne. However, most of the material in this collection is available online. In fact, over 95% of materials currently published by the Government Printing Office are freely available in full-text online,” said Justina Elmore, Coordinator of the Government Documents Collection. “We spent last semester working with faculty to determine what and how much of this collection we could, and have room to, retain.”

Now that the size of the collection has been reduced to just the government documents that our patrons actually use, the library has begun the process of moving them back to Milne. Additionally, Milne Library will continue to offer quick delivery via IDS for any deselected items that are not yet online, should the need arise. Luckily, there are two Federal Depository libraries in the area from which to draw.

Bringing these materials back to Milne will make finding and using government documents easier. Most of the material will become part of the general collection, allowing us to reduce the number of places a researcher must look in order to find materials on a particular topic.

Wave Machines, Puppets, and a Scavenger Hunt: The Perfect Field Trip!

On Friday, March 27, SUNY Geneseo was host to four 3rd graders and their teachers from the Genesee Valley BOCES program. The purpose of the visit was to introduce the students (all on the Autism Spectrum) to the idea of attending college and for them to experience the life of a college student (at least for one day). Each of the visiting students was paired up with a Geneseo School of Education student, who served  as their “buddy” for the day. The following is a write-up from one of the buddys.
miranda2“…I was able to spend the morning and afternoon with four great students from the BOCES program. My buddy for the day was a third grader named Makayla. We spent the morning looking at the wave machine in the Science building at Geneseo and seeing the cool things that happened when waves caused erosion on a shoreline! At lunch Makayla and I sat together with another student, Landon, and his college-buddy. They were telling us all about themselves including their pets and siblings and even what they have learned in school this year (they were especially excited to tell us about their fraction knowledge).  Makayla was full of questions about college and was really interested with the fact that we lived here as well as went to school! We next got to have some fun running around campus during our scavenge hunt. Makayla was especially excited about finding a colorful piano in the College Union, and even started to play some notes! When we finally arrived at our last location, the library, there were prizes waiting for the students. Makayla was really excited about her prizes and showed them off all around! It was a great time to read with her and see her interest in all the different books and puppets she could look at and use in the library. Overall it was a great day filled with lots of fun and excitement!”

patrick2lauren2andy2

This was an amazing experience, not only for the 3rd graders but for the Geneseo students (and staff) as well! We hope that this is just the first in many such opportunities.

The Imaginarium: A creative Space for SOE Students

The Imaginarium is an open space located in Milne Library on the Lower Level. It is place where School of Education students have access to a wide variety of materials and resources that help them to create dynamic lessons, displays, bulletin boards, models and many more projects.

imaginarium-collageThe Imaginarium helps students connect manipulatives and other additive resources such as, games, textbooks, and videos to their lessons and assignments to create more exciting and lively projects and presentations.

The Imaginarium is also available to clubs, organizations, and the community to use along side the wide variety of materials in the TERC collection, including lots of fiction and non-fiction children books, games, and puppets.

Office hours are on Monday and Wednesday from 7pm-9pm. Please feel free to stop by with questions or help you need with upcoming projects! In addition send an email directly to the Imaginarium curator, Miranda ([email protected]) or Education Librarian, Michelle Costello ([email protected]).

Where to find tax forms?

Photo credit: flickr user Images_of_Money

Photo credit: flickr user Images_of_Money

It’s tax season again…  Unfortunately, real life isn’t as simple as advancing past “go” and collecting our $200. Instead, we’ll be dusting off our calculators and filling out those forms.

You can find both Federal Tax Forms and New York State Tax Forms online.

Or check out these five great places to get tax forms or file online.

New Access to Experian’s Credit Data Reports

business_research-400x300Our ABI/INFORM database now has access to the Experian Commercial Risk Database, containing over 40 million credit data reports for both private and public companies, allowing researchers to see details such as contact information, size, industry, MSA, sales range, business type, bankruptcy information, credit risk, and more. These reports are full-text with coverage from December 10, 1980 to the present.

ABI/INFORM can be found under recommended databases on both the Business/Economics and Accounting/Auditing library research guides.

To find these reports, search ABI/INFORM for a company (e.g.“Ford Motor company”), then limit to reports (or limit further to just experian reports under publication title).

FindingExperianReports_ABI-INFORM

For more info on the new content, see the announcement on ProQuest’s blog.

Picture Perfect! Teaching with Picture Books

picturebooksThe adage “A picture is worth a thousand words” rings especially true when talking about picture books. Anyone who has browsed through bookstore or library shelves can attest to the fact that a compelling photo or illustration on the cover may entice us to pick up a rather dull sounding book. We may ask ourselves “Why is there a skull and crossbones on the cover”, or “what is that woman thinking, swimming with that shark?”

In addition to making texts more appealing the artwork in picture books can make it easier for readers to make sense of the accompanying (sometimes complex) text. This can be particularly helpful to classroom teachers who are looking for ways to introduce complicated or controversial topics to their students.

Milne Library has a large collection of picture books on various subjects and themes such as: geometry, human impact on the earth, disabilities, grief, and acceptance. Using picture books to introduce these topics can help both the teacher (making it easier to cover difficult to understand content) and the students (may engage them with content they normally wouldn’t choose).

All children’s picture books are located on the lower level of the library in the Teacher Education Resource Center (TERC). A few new titles, with summaries (from the catalog/book jacket), are listed below. For help on locating these books visit this site or contact the education librarian, Michelle Costello ([email protected]).

Titles:

  • Bats on Parade by Kathi Appelt — “On a midsummer’s night the Marching Bat Band makes a rare appearance, its members grouped in formations that demonstrate multiplication from two times two up to ten times ten.”
  • A Boy and a Jaguar by Alan Rabinowitz — “The renowned cat conservationist reflects on his early childhood struggles with a speech disorder, describing how he only spoke fluently when he was communicating with animals and how he resolved at a young age to find his voice to be their advocate.”
  • Cloud Spinner by — Michael Catchpool “When the king orders a boy to make him a huge wardrobe out of the clouds in the sky, the boy warns him that it is more than he needs but the king does not listen.”
  • Half a World Away by Libby Gleeson — “When Louie’s best friend Amy moves to the other side of the world, Louie must find a way to reconnect with her.”
  • House Held Up by Trees by Ted Kooser– “Built on a treeless yard by a family who cleared away all the sprouting trees on the property, a house is eventually abandoned and left to deteriorate on a lot that is gradually overrun by wild trees, in a poignant tale of loss, change, and nature’s quiet triumph.”
  • Same, Same, but Different by Jenny Sue Kostecki-Shaw — “Pen pals Elliot and Kailash discover that even though they live in different countries–America and India–they both love to climb trees, have pets, and ride a school bus.”
  • The Tin Forest by Helen Ward– “An old man’s persistent dreams transform a garbage dump into a forest full of life.”
  • Varmints. Part One by Helen Ward & Marc Craste — “When tall buildings and loud noise drown out the sounds of bees in the grass and birds in the sky, one soul cares enough to start over again and help nature thrive.”