Alan Witt, Milne’s New Business Librarian

Milne Library is delighted to welcome our new Business Librarian, Alan Witt, who comes to us from Rivier University, New Hampshire. Alan has B.A.s in Archeology & Medieval Studies from Wesleyan University in Connecticut, & an M.A. in History (Medieval Studies) & a Master’s in Library & Information Studies from the University of Rhode Island.

As you might expect from his educational background, Alan has a wide & eclectic group of interests & activities, including playing board games & gaming in general; acapella music ranging from medieval madrigals to modern pop, aikido (a martial art), baking breads & cookies, & reading, particularly fantasy & sci-fi (e.g., George RR Martin & Jim Butcher). And like many of Milne’s librarians, he is owned by a cat, Alaric.

Since arriving here in Geneseo in November Alan has been working with the faculty of the School of Business to expand the library’s business-related research classes & is looking forward to working with students on their business assignments. You can find Alan on the main floor of Milne Library in the Instruction Librarian “fishbowl,” or reach him at [email protected]. Welcome, Alan…we’re really glad you’re here!

Brandon West, Our New Social Science Librarian

BWestMilne Library is excited to welcome Brandon West as our new Social Sciences Reference & Instruction Librarian. Brandon joins us from SUNY Oswego where he was the Online Instruction/Instructional Design Librarian. In addition to teaching information literacy classes he used his extensive knowledge of online teaching and learning, instructional design and pedagogy to help faculty and staff develop and deliver both in-person and online courses.

Here at Geneseo, Brandon will be the liaison to the Anthropology, Psychology, Sociology, and Political Science Departments, and will work closely with faculty, students, and staff to help them with their information literacy, research, and collection development needs.

Prior to working in an academic environment, Brandon worked at the Grand Rapids Public Library in Grand Rapids, MI; he is also a former elementary school teacher, having been a fourth grade teacher in Charleston, SC.

Brandon received his B.A. at Grand Valley State University in English and Elementary Education, his M.Ed. from Grand Valley State University in Educational Technology, and his M.L.S. from Texas Woman’s University. As a life-long learner, he is currently pursuing a Certificate of Graduate Study in Online Learning and Teaching from the University at Albany.

In Brandon’s spare time he is the member of many national library committees and teams, such as the ACRL Instruction Session Teaching Methods Committee, the ALA GLBT Round Table, and he co-chairs the ACRL Distance Learning Section Awards Committee. In his spare, spare time he enjoys traveling, taste testing new restaurants, and parenting his two cat children.

Why use Primary Sources?

A Primary source is material created at the time of an historical event and provides a true account of that event or time period. They are a great way to expose students to multiple perspectives on past and present events and issues.

Identifying and finding primary sources can be a challenge, however, which may dissuade students from using them in their research. The video below, designed by librarians Sue Ann Brainard and Michelle Costello, introduces the plight of the Little Rock Nine and their integration struggles through the use of primary sources, such as images, oral histories, government documents and music.

Sue Ann Brainard – [email protected]

Michelle Costello – [email protected]

LittleRock9

Milne Librarians, Published!

LILACCongratulations to Milne Librarians, Kim Hoffman and Michelle Costello on the recent publication of their article,

Davies-Hoffman, K., Alvarez, B., Costello, M., & Emerson, D. (2013). Keeping pace with information literacy instruction for the real world: When will MLS programs wake up and smell the LILACs? Communications in Information Literacy, 7 (1), 9-23.

Communications in Information Literacy is a peer-reviewed, open access journal dedicated to advancing knowledge, theory, and research in information literacy.

Conceiving and implementing LILAC (not just once, but twice! as well as inspiring several similar programs) and now publishing to advocate change in the education of future librarians; they’re making an impact! Nice work, ladies!

Curious about the Library Instruction Leadership Academy (LILAC)? You can take a look at the “greatest hits” video from the most recent series to get an idea of how it has impacted the latest group of librarians in the program. You can also learn about the first series in an earlier blog post from 2010.

And let’s not forget that in 2011, The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) selected Kim and Michelle to receive its Instruction Section (IS) Innovation award for their work in developing LILAC.

When you check out the article, also be sure to look for comments from Alyse Hennig, Geneseo-grad-turned-Librarian too!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LILAC II

In collaboration with the Rochester Regional Library Council and many, many librarian volunteers throughout the Western and Central New York State area, Milne Library is thrilled to announce the kick off of the second Library Instruction Leadership Academy (LILAC).  The first program, envisioned by Milne librarians Michelle Costello and Kim Davies-Hoffman, was offered in Spring 2010 with 11 participants – librarians who were new to classroom instruction and who desired a more effective and engaging teaching approach.

This year’s LILAC has attracted many more applicants but could only accommodate for its current 21 students.  Participants hail from Buffalo, Alfred, Rochester and Syracuse and the types of libraries where they work is just as diverse – the Adam Mickiewicz Library & Dramatic Circle (the oldest surviving Polish library in Buffalo, NY), the Business Career Management Center at University of Rochester’s Simon School, the Scottsville Free Public Library and SUNY’s Upstate Health Sciences Library, just to name a few.

An additional highlight to the exciting array of students is the inclusion of three recent SUNY Geneseo graduates who have gone on to pursue a Masters in Library Science – Bonnie Archer (‘07, English Literature), Maura Proctor (‘04, History, Honors Program), and Chad Taylor (‘99, Philosophy with English and Medieval Studies minors).

While serving different age groups, populations and special interests, all 21 LILAC participants have one thing in common – the desire to become better teachers.  They started on this path by attending 1) the January 24 kick-off celebration where they were able to become acquainted with the expectations of the LILAC program and meet like-minded librarians in their cohort and 2) the first two full-day workshop which took place on January 28 and February 27.

SUNY Geneseo Education professor, Dr. Brian Morgan*, led the foundational workshop for the academy which focused on pedagogical theory and how to translate that into effective teaching practice.  The intention of LILAC is that subsequent presenters will address and emulate the theory-to-practice model, as introduced by Dr. Morgan and through their own workshop delivery. *

To prepare LILAC students for their next workshop session, Teaching with Technology (March 27),  the academy planning team has immersed them in educational technology.  Pre-workshop, the students joined in a discussion around learning new technologies via Voicethread, during the session, students will choose a chat room (from a choice of three learning management system [LMS] platforms) where they will engage in creating a new learning (digital) asset, and then come together for a larger group discussion in Blackboard’s Collaborate.  The LILAC LMS, Moodle, will provide the traditional text-based discussion forum for students to reflect, share ideas and ask questions post-workshop.

LILAC will run through June 2013 with a total five full-day workshops; observations of librarians’ teaching; outside (online) reading assignments, reflections and student discussions; and a final mini-presentation that demonstrates improved teaching practice.

Already recognized nationally by the ACRL Instruction Section Innovation Award, LILAC organizers are hopeful of similar success for their participants in 2013.  We are also pleased to announce the upcoming publication, “Keeping pace with information literacy instruction for the real world: When will MLS programs wake up and smell the LILACs?” in the online, open access journal Communications in Information Literacy. The u

ltimate goal in writing this piece is to gradually transform graduate-level curriculum in Library and Information Science programs across the country.

Claud1
Ms. Jane Mannheim Claud, Geneseo ‘69

* The inclusion of a Master Instructor with expertise in pedagogical theory and practice was made possible by a generous donation from Ms. Jane Mannheim Claud, Geneseo ‘69.

Primary Sources: Hands-on History!

Using primary sources is an excellent technique for exploring historical events or topics. Knowing what a primary source is and finding concrete examples however, can be challenging. The video below, designed by librarians Sue Ann Brainard and Michelle Costello, introduces the plight of the Little Rock Nine and their integration struggles through the use of primary sources, such as images, oral histories, government documents and music.

This video is intended to be an introduction to a set of tutorials on specific research tools and techniques used to locate and access primary sources, to be created over the next year or so.

Please feel free to contact us with ideas for content and to let us know if you are interested in designing or developing future tutorials.

Sue Ann Brainard – [email protected]

Michelle Costello – [email protected]

Understanding Citations: The Tutorial

Citation Tutorial

Keyword searching via Google or one of Milne Library’s many databases is probably the first and most heavily used method in an undergrad student’s research toolkit.  Are you finding the right mix of terms and search tools to locate the most appropriate sources?  Do you spend hours at a computer trying to identify and connect “like-minded” articles?

A primary method in a scholar’s research toolkit is to track down citations within a relevant source’s bibliography.  It stands to reason that the research a scholar used to inform his/her work would be related to that author’s initial topic and can thus be found in the comprehensive works cited list.  In other words, find one perfect article and its bibliography will lead you to many more related sources.

The trick, however, is to know how to read a citation, no matter what writing style it’s in – APA, MLA, Turabian, NLM – to know what type of source you’re dealing with (e.g. journal or newspaper article, book, book chapter, legal case) in order to then locate and get your hands on that source.

If you are confused by the various structures of the myriad citation writing styles, check out this self-paced tutorial for a complete lesson (including interactive exercises) on reading different citations.

After this lesson, you should be reading citations and locating the necessary material like a pro!

Kim Davies Hoffman: Profile of a Milne Librarian

Kim Davies Hoffman bringing theory into practice
Kim Davies Hoffman bringing theory into practice

Kim Davies Hoffman is a tireless instruction & reference librarian, a valuable team player, a careful mentor, and, as of last spring, Coordinator of Instruction & Reference Services at Milne Library. Kim has risen through the ranks fairly quickly during her 12 years as a SUNY librarian (nearly all that time at Geneseo) and was promoted to Full Librarian on Sept. 1 this year. Of her professional growth in that time, she says, “There has definitely been a shift from learning and doing to guiding, mentoring and leading.”

With her extensive list of college committee memberships and outreach efforts, it’s a fair bet that Kim is familiar to many people on this campus, especially the faculty and students in the academic departments she serves as liaison – Anthropology, Sociology and Foreign Languages.  She has taught hundreds of information literacy and research skills classes over the years, but perhaps her most important and fulfilling contribution has been in collaborating with individual professors to integrate long-term, intensive and progressive library instruction within their courses. Her collaborators have included Ellen Kintz (Anthropology), Elaine Cleeton (Sociology) and Cristina Rowley (Spanish), to name just a few.

Kim’s professional reputation extends well beyond Geneseo, through the many presentations she has made at local, state and national conferences, as well as through articles she has written (or co-written), committee memberships and positions she has held, and programs she has been instrumental in creating. It is possible to list only a few here.  “My preference for professional committee work is on a local scale, she says.  “I have been able to make much more of an impact on my fellow colleagues and the profession overall than I would serving as a mere number within a larger national organization.”

In the SUNY Librarians Association (SUNYLA),  Kim served  for five years as Chair of Membership Development Committee, from which sprang MEOW (Membership Enthusiasm and Outreach Workgroup) which Kim helped formSUNYLA  logo with a few other librarians who were frustrated with the lack of participation in SUNYLA. She also served as Chair of the Working Group for Information Literacy and in that capacity worked with fellow Milne librarian Michelle Costello to design and host a one-day interactive workshop entitled Library Instruction: Teaching Tips from the Trenches, in January 2009. That workshop led to a similar one hosted at the University of Albany plus a follow-up pre-conference workshop at the SUNYLA annual conference, also in 2009. The program evolved, with the help of a $3,500 grant, into LILAC, the acclaimed Library Instruction Leadership Academy. For their work, Kim and Michelle were recognized by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) with its 2011 Instruction Section (IS) Innovation award.

Kim with LILAC co-creator Michelle Costello
Kim with LILAC co-creator Michelle Costello

Among the several other awards Kim has received are the Friend of SUNYLA award and the (SUNY) Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Librarianship.

So where did she come from?  Shortly after she was born, in England, Kim and her family moved to Canada where she lived for the next ten years before moving permanently to the U.S. (she has dual British-U.S. citizenship). She has lived for two years in France, as well – studying abroad in Dijon for a year, and, soon after, for another year as a teaching assistant in Paris. She earned a BA in French and International Affairs from the University of New Hampshire and, after receiving an MLS from the University of Buffalo in 1997, took off for New Orleans, working first in the public library system and then at the University of New Orleans.  When NOLA’s heat and humidity drove her back north, Kim found a part-time librarian position at SUNY Fredonia (which she supplemented as a barista at Starbucks), until she landed a full-time job as a librarian at UB’s Health Sciences Library. By late summer 1999 Kim was hired by Milne Library as a reference & instruction (with a side of government documents) librarian.  She hit the ground running and hasn’t slowed down since.

As for where she is going from here, her priorities lay, as usual, with finding new and creative ways to increase information literacy among the students – and faculty – at Geneseo, in an increasingly online world.  As Coordinator of Instruction & Reference Service, she will work to refine assessment of the library’s instruction program, not only to prove what she and many others already know – that it IS effective – but to enable it to become even better.  And plans are well underway for LILAC2, which will help empower a fresh crop of new library instructors to “teach it forward.” Citing a commitment to lead by example as one of her greatest strengths, Kim says “The opportunity to co-teach with novice librarians allows me to share my understanding of pedagogical theory and practice without appearing lofty and without exposing their insecurity or uncertainty about teaching.”  She adds, “My fearlessness in the classroom opens the door for others to experiment with new ideas and technology.”

Organize Your Web Research with Diigo

Organize Your Web Research with Diigo
Organize Your Web Research with Diigo

Organize Your Web Research with Diigo (Ruby Certificate)

Thursday, September 29, 2:30-3:30 pm
Milne Library Room 121

Diigo is a powerful research and collaboration tool that can help you save, organize, and share what you discover on the web. Don’t do research twice! Learn how to save, annotate, tag and share websites while creating your own personal archive.

Walk-ins are welcome! Bring your own laptop or check out a netbook at Milne’s Service Desk!