Advanced Database Searching: Improve Your Search Results

GOLD.AdvancedSearvhingPlease bring a laptop to the workshop!

Leaders, scholars, and professionals all have one thing in common: they have complex information needs. This workshop will teach participants to leverage the power of online search tools by applying filters, citation tracking, and other techniques rarely used by casual researchers. You’ll be expert researchers after this workshop!
Instructors: Bonnie Swoger – Library Faculty, Milne Library; Sue Ann Brainard – Library Faculty, Milne Library

Tuesday, October 25th
1:00 – 2:00 pm
GOLD Leadership Center,
MacVittie College Union, Room 114

[Register for Ruby Certificate Credit]

Basic Database Searching Workshop

"Although I did know about some methods of research already this workshop introduced me to even more effective methods that will be extremely helpful." Paula M.
“Although I did know about some methods of research already this workshop introduced me to even more effective methods that will be extremely helpful.” Paula M.

Please bring a laptop to the workshop!

Great leaders gather information and critically analyze the facts before making good decisions. Attendees at this workshop will discover helpful tips and strategies that are used in any kind of database to help improve their searches, save time and determine the best quality resources for their research.  Instructor: Dan Ross – Academic Excellence, Milne Library

Basic Database Searching*  
Monday, September 12th
2:30 – 3:30 pm |
MacVittie College Union Room 322/323

[Register for Ruby Certificate Credit] *Required Workshop

Accessing eBooks @ Milne

 

Did you know you have access to a collection of over 36,000 ebooks through Milne Library?  Finding them is easy!

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s how:

Step 1. Search for the topic or book title you need in our IDS Search.  From the results page, select “ebooks.”

Step 2.  Click on the title of the book you wish to access.

Step 3. Click on the “weblink” provided.

In addition to the ebooks purchased by Milne Library, you can access millions of ebooks on the web from sources like Google Books, Project Gutenberg, and HathiTrust.  Find out how more on our library guide for finding ebooks.

CSA databases are moving to the ProQuest interface, including PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, Worldwide Political Science Abstracts and more

Users who have become familiar with the CSA interface for the following databases will expect some changes over the next month or so:

  • ASSIA (Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts)
  • ERIC
  • PAIS
  • PILOTS
  • Physical Education Index
  • PsycARTICLES
  • PsycINFO
  • Social Services Abstracts
  • Sociological Abstracts
  • Worldwide Political Science Abstracts

CSA purchased the ProQuest family of databases in 2007 and is finally moving all their interfaces to the new ProQuest platform so all databases  have similar layouts, help menus and navigation.  At the end of March 2011, CSA will be discontinuing the search interface through its CSA Illumina website and only using the ProQuest platform.  We want to inform you of the upcoming changes with enough time to  give all users experience testing the search capabilities of this new platform.  All “old interface” links to the listed databases will be available through the end of March.   If students or faculty encounter problems with the new search interface, please inform library staff immediately and we will troubleshoot any problems.

The new interface for PsycInfo and other databases listed above

For more information about the new search interface, go to the ProQuest website.

Or, please contact Kate Pitcher, Head of Technical Services and Collection Development at [email protected] or by phone at 245-5064 for further details.

Stop by and learn about our powerful new resource: Scopus

On Monday, April 14, representatives from Elsevier Publishers will be in the Milne Library Lobby from 10:00am to 12:00pm demonstrating the citation database Scopus, a recent addition to Milne Library’s research resources. Scopus covers a wide variety of articles related to the physical sciences, biomedical sciences, and social sciences.

In addition to keyword searching, this database allows users to track down the citation history of a known publication.

For example, if you found a really great article for the term paper you have due next week, you can use Scopus to locate other articles that cited your really great article.

Scopus also provides the ability to easily narrow your search by subject area, publication year, and keyword.

Stop by the library on Monday morning (April 14) to learn more about this powerful new resource.

Do you know why you use the search engine you do?

Do you use Google for your web searches? Yahoo! search? Windows Live search? Why do you prefer the one you use?

The Google Operating System Blog recently polled its readers about which search they prefer. The twist was that they had users perform searches using each service in a modified form, so that is was impossible to tell (based on appearance) which search was which. Preferences were (theoretically) based purely on search results. You can read the original post, and the poll results. Google won with 1041 votes, followed by Windows Live with 711 and Yahoo! with 604. (Users were allowed to vote for more than one if they felt that the search results were equally good.)

This poll isn’t scientific, and there are numerous flaws with the methodology, but it raises some interesting questions. Google searches account for about 53% of all searches performed (see Search Engine Watch). This falls in line roughly with the results of this poll, but not with the public perception that we “google” everything. The poll results are also surprising given the Google-centricity of the blog: Google won, but not by a lot.

So, why do you use the search engine you do? Convenience? Ease of use? Quality? Force of habit? Format?

Why not take a few minutes to try out some other search engines and think about what you like? Try a visual search like KartOO or check up the updated features on Ask.com. If you decide to stick with your old search engine, what makes it a better engine for you?