3D printing now available at the CIT HelpDesk in Milne Library

Stop by Milne Library and look behind the glass of the CIT HelpDesk. There you will find two 3D printers hard at work
creating three-dimensional objects of all sorts. 3D printing is a process of making three-dimensional solid objects from a digital file using a wide range of material like plastic, metal, and ceramics. A 3D printer lays down layer upon layer of material until the object is created.

You can design your own 3D objects using software on the Geneseo lab computers or find ready-to-print STL files on 3D community websites like thingiverse.com and youmagine.com. Many community members on these sites share their designs under a Creative Commons license, so you can use, alter, and print the designs.

The printing cost is based on the weight of the 3D object after it is printed. The cost is 4 cents per gram with a 50-cent service charge and there is a rainbow of colors to choose from.

Geneseo is running a new three-credit experimental course this semester entitled Intro to 3D Modeling and Printing.

PrinterCloseUpTo learn more about CIT’s 3D printing service, including how to submit an object for printing and to learn about the CIT Experimental Lab visit wiki.geneseo.edu/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=105971950 .

The Internet is SO S – L – O – W…?!

CIT.iOSdownload2Our friends in CIT have issued the following notice:

iOS 8, the next update for Apple iPhones and iPads, is over 2GB in size. It’s huge. It will be released tomorrow, Wednesday, September 17. We have hundreds of these Apple devices on campus. If any significant number of them all attempt to download their update at the same time, we are going to suffer a genuine case of network over-utilization.

We are looking at deploying a caching server to minimize some of this pain, but, realistically, the network, the Internet, wireless, it’s all going to be slow and painful for the next few days. Please don’t be surprised when things don’t behave as usual and perform below their usual standard.

Thanks!

 

 

Security Issues for Internet Explorer

IE-blogIf you use Internet Explorer, you may want to check out what CIT NewsBytes has to say about protecting yourself from the latest hacking vulnerabilities in IE.

For now, CIT recommends updating your IE browser and using IE “only for Geneseo websites that require IE. All non-Geneseo websites should be accessed with an alternate browser (Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.).”

Check the CIT NewsBytes for updates on this security issue.

Change Passwords to Avoid the Heartache of Heartbleed

HeartbleedIf you’ve been under a rock the past week, you may not be aware that many of your online accounts might have been compromised by the heartbleed bug.  The security breach is with the servers you have been logging into (e.g. Gmail, instant messaging, Facebook, Instagram, Netflix, Dropbox, etc.), so the best thing that you can do is change your passwords for those accounts sooner rather than later.

Mashable has compiled a great list of accounts that may have been affected including social networks, email providers, online shopping sites, financial institutions and more.  Bottom line, now might be a good time to update your passwords and continue to do so on a regular basis.

Geneseo’s CIT NewsBytes offers some other tips as well and will continue to update the campus on this issue.

Drawing a Line…In the Ether

Transparency VS Anonymity
Transparency VS Anonymity
Right to Privacy?

As scholars and professionals, many of us spend a lot of time in the connected digital realms of the interwebs. While the Internet allows us access to information and entertainment of all kinds, individuals and companies – both benign and malicious – are getting much more savvy about finding, tracking, and collecting information in the other direction — about you!

While this infographic (left) is positively ancient at nearly a year old, it gets to an important issue of how the web is used as a communication tool and it got me wondering about how folks in our community feel about the topic, whether they’re aware of the issues, and what precautions they take – or don’t care about!

Poll results from Mashable
Results of Mashable's Anonymity Poll

According to this poll  (right) from Mashable which shows nearly 80% support, people overwhelmingly feel that anonymity is an important quality for their web experience. Pseudonyms are a common and time-honored  strategy used by folks to maintain a kind of privacy/anonymity. Would we have the published works of George Elliot or the Bronte sisters had they not committed this subterfuge? And what of the “victims of fame” like Charles de Lint who, after gaining a devoted following as a fantasy author, used an alternative name to publish a series horror stories.

Many people whose professional work all-but-requires them to have an online identity (including myself) have created separate online personas where they can interact with non-work related communities. Some long-time bloggers who have shared extensively about their expertise and life have come to regret the decision, despite what they and others may have gained from their open sharing. This evidence notwithstanding, Internet giant Google has made it clear that the only way you’ll use their Google+ services is with your “real” identity.

How do you use the web? Do you fall more to the side of supporting transparency or anonymity? In between? Tell us in the comments!