Dr. Walter Harding to be Subject of Exhibit

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Dr. Walter Harding (1917-1996)

Library Intern Demi Monachino and Milne Library’s Special Collections Librarian, Liz Argentieri, are currently hard at work creating an exhibit dedicated to one of the college’s most distinguished and influential professors, Dr. Walter Harding, who was on the Geneseo faculty from 1956 to 1983. Dr. Harding was one of the world’s leading Thoreau scholars, and we find ourselves up to our elbows in the many essays, articles, and tributes he wrote centering on Henry David Thoreau (an original Transcendentalist and the author of Walden). Among all of these scholarly documents on Thoreau, however, we are also finding some truly amazing information on Dr. Harding himself.

This man, who accomplished so much in a lifetime and amassed one of the world’s largest collection of Thoreauviana, was a large influence on not just the Geneseo community, but the world. It is somewhat hard to believe that a professor from our small college town in western New York was sent to Japan by the State Department to teach Thoreau there, and received letters from the likes of President Jimmy Carter, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Albert Einstein, just to name a few. For us, Dr. Harding is truly starting to come alive once again through these testimonials and remnants of his legacy, found in our own Milne Library and in the Thoreau Society’s Walter Harding Collection at Walden Woods, where we’ll be visiting later this spring.

Walter Harding wrote the definitive biography of Thoreau

Walter Harding wrote the definitive biography of Henry David Thoreau

Image courtesy of the Thoreau Society

Image courtesy of the Thoreau Society

The goal of the exhibit, which will be on display in Milne during the weeks surrounding the annual Walter Harding Lecture this fall, is to share with current Geneseo students and faculty the kind of awe and pride Dr. Harding’s life and work has inspired in us. We want to reintroduce to the community this remarkable man and scholar that many have never had the pleasure to meet (and some may have never heard of), and to open their eyes to a man who, despite having such a large global impact, always remained humble. In this presentation of Dr. Harding’s knowledge, wit, and accomplishment, we only hope that we do justice to his legacy.

~ Article written by Demi Monachino

Pilot: What is VoiceThread? We Need Your Help!

VThreadAre you looking for new ways to engage students? SUNY Geneseo is piloting a trial of VoiceThread and needs your feedback.

VoiceThread is an interactive collaborative learning tool that can be used to enhance student engagement outside of the classroom or in online environments. With VoiceThread, instructors and/or students can create, share, and comment on images, PowerPoint presentations, videos, audio files, documents, and PDFs using microphone, webcam, text, phone, and audio-file upload. At SUNY Geneseo, VoiceThread is an external tool that integrates into myCourses.

VoiceThread can be used in many different ways to enhance classroom learning experiences. Use it for flipping instruction, discussions outside of class, critiquing work, remediation, or practicing language skills.

A couple of examples to consider (more below):

Accessing VoiceThread

You may access VoiceThread in two ways: in myCourses and through Geneseo’s VoiceThread Website.

myCourses access:  Adding VoiceThread to your course

  • Navigate to your course.
  • Click “Add Content”.
  • Select “External Tool”.
  • Give the activity a title.
  • For tool provider, select “VoiceThread”.
  • Check the box that says “Enable grading”.
  • Save changes.

For more information on how to create your first thread visit – https://voicethread.com/howto/angel/

 

Geneseo VoiceThread Website:

Faculty and students are also able to create a Voicethread without using Angel, visit https://geneseo.voicethread.com and register with a geneseo.edu email account.

 

VoiceThread Support Team:

If you would like to learn more about VoiceThread or want assistance setting it up for your course, contact:

Brandon West: [email protected]

Michelle Costello: [email protected]

 

Additional Links

Learn more about VoiceThread’s Features:

Additional Examples of VoiceThread in the Higher Ed Classroom:

 

Scholarly Publishing Across the Disciplines: Interviews with Geneseo Faculty: Faculty value of scholarly collaboration, communications, and output

Scholarly Publishing Across the Disciplines: Interviews with Geneseo Faculty

Part IV: Faculty value of scholarly collaboration, communications, and output

SCPublished.SliderThe fourth part of Milne Library’s ongoing series about Geneseo research and publishing practices is now available (PDF). Faculty value of scholarly collaboration, communications and output documents faculty collaborations in research and publishing; faculty’s publishing motivations and influences; and the scholarly communication and output practices amongst the Geneseo faculty interviewed.

About the series:

The Milne Library Scholarly Communications team and librarian liaisons for the campus academic departments interviewed 87 faculty members in one-on-one conversations during the academic year 2010-11 and part of academic year 2011-12.  The results of these interviews were analyzed and documented in a series of reports which are on schedule for release from September 2013 – February 2014.

The interviews conducted with Geneseo faculty members were intended to be a survey of the current research and publishing practices on campus, giving us a glimpse of the issues affecting Geneseo faculty, including the changing scholarly publishing environment, digital and online scholarship, peer review, publishing with undergraduate researchers and open access.

The first three reports in the series document the issues and responses surrounding faculty and undergraduate students involved in research and publishing; the quickly changing environment surrounding digital scholarship and its value on campus and in the disciplines; and faculty participation in open access endeavors such as publishing in open access journals and self archiving of work. In particular, we look at ways in which the library may be able to meet the needs of new initiatives on campus.

To read the reports, please visit the Milne Library Scholarly Communication’s webpage at http://libguides.geneseo.edu/AcrosstheDisciplines

We welcome your feedback about the reports.  Send any comments or questions to Kate Pitcher at [email protected] or by phone at 585-245-5064.

 

Scholarly Publishing across the Disciplines: Interviews with Geneseo Faculty

CostelloPeckInterviewThe Milne Library Scholarly Communications team and librarian liaisons for the campus academic departments interviewed 87 faculty members in one-on-one conversations during the academic year 2010-11 and part of academic year 2011-12.  The results of these interviews were analyzed and documented in a series of reports which will be issued over the next few months.

The interviews conducted with Geneseo faculty members were intended to be a survey of the current research and publishing practices on campus, giving us a glimpse of the issues affecting Geneseo faculty, including the changing scholarly publishing environment, digital and online scholarship, peer review, publishing with undergraduate researchers and open access.

faculty interviews wordle.SMThe first two reports in this series (both released today) document the issues and responses surrounding faculty and undergraduate students involved in research and publishing and the quickly changing environment surrounding digital scholarship and its value on campus and in the disciplines.  In particular, we look at ways in which the library may be able to meet the needs of new initiatives on campus.

To read the reports, please visit the Milne Library Scholarly Communications’ webpage at http://libguides.geneseo.edu/AcrossTheDisciplines

We welcome your feedback about the reports.  Send any comments or questions to Kate Pitcher at [email protected] or by phone at 585-245-5064.

Milne Library Scholarly Communications Team

 

History Professors Weed Milne Garden!

WeedingGraphic

What’s going on with all the books? WEEDING!

SUNY Geneseo History professors spent some time recently “weeding” the history books on Milne’s top floor. Weeding is the kinder, gentler word librarians use for discarding books!

The reality is that every library has to discard books from time to time, to make room for new books and to rid the collection of old, outdated, and possibly misleading books. In the science and medical section, for instance, a book from 1950 could be dangerous, with information that has long since been proven wrong!

Weeding the history section, however, can be tricky because a book whose information is out of date still has use for historiography purposes, in other words, to study the changing interpretation of historical events over time. So, for instance, a book published in 1962 that mentions Malcolm X might not be accurate in light of recent research about Malcolm X, but that 1962 book may be extremely useful as a primary source when studying changing attitudes about race in this country.

The history professors, then, had to determine the worth of each book as an information source, as a classic historical text, and as a primary source, as well as considering the condition of the book, how easy the book would be to obtain on interlibrary loan, and if students at Geneseo are studying the topic or not. If a book doesn’t meet the criteria, out it goes! Since January, 522 books have been weeded from the Milne history collection, and 129 new history books have been ordered so far to replace them.BWB

But don’t worry, the books we “weed” aren’t tossed in a garbage bin! We send them to a company called Better World Books, which re-sells them for us and sends us a portion of the profit, which we use to buy new books.  A portion of Better World Books’ profit also funds high-impact literacy projects in the United States and around the world.

Women’s Studies: 40 Years Strong!

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Members of the Womyn’s Action Coalition show their pride

Check out the Women’s Studies 40th Anniversary display in Milne library, through March 1st.

See photos and statements by alumni on how Women’s Studies is important to them; timelines, posters, and documents on the history of our program; faculty publications, and interactive displays about our activity and history here on Geneseo’s campus.

The Women’s Studies program is governed by a coordinator and an Advisory Committee of faculty across many disciplines and students representing the academic program and co-curricular programs like Womyn’s Action Coalition (WAC), Voices for Planned Parenthood (VOX), and Pride.

WMSTFB1For up-to-date information on upcoming events related to women and gender studies, “like” their Facebook Page.

Do you have further questions? For answers, or to declare a minor or concentration in Women’s Studies, please see Melanie Blood, Coordinator, in Welles 217A.

Faculty Bookshelf: Interview with Cheryl Kreutter

A continuing series of interviews with SUNY Geneseo faculty on their reading interests; today’s “Faculty Bookshelf” delves into the pursuits of School of Education professor, Cheryl Kreutter.

What are your current research Interests?
My current research interests focus on literacy teacher education, critical literacy, and international children’s & young adult literature.  I wonder how reading and reflecting on literature through a critical literacy lens might impact teachers’ use of international text. I’m also curious about how the Common Core State Standards will influence teacher choice of literature and pedagogy in English Language Arts classrooms.


What is your favorite literary genre to read for pleasure?

Action and adventure, particularly those involving aviation.

What book is on your nightstand now?
Now We Read, We See, We Speak: Portrait of Literacy Development in an Adult Freierian-Based Class by Victoria Purcell-Gates and Robin A. Waterman

Tell us about a book that changed your life.
A book that has highly influenced my professional thinking is Pedagogy of the Oppressed by Paulo Freire.  Freire believed that the true purpose of literacy education is to liberate people to become fully human.  Teachers and students must engage in dynamic, mutual exchanges to read critically both the world and the word, in order to deconstruct the layers of socio-political meanings of words and reconstruct meanings that contribute toward the transformation of an unjust society. I purposefully incorporate dialogue and critique throughout my courses to emphasize personal and social transformation attained through literacy.

Name a book you just couldn’t finish.
The Ask and the Answer: Chaos Walking: Book Two by Patrick Ness.  (sequel to Knife of Never Letting Go.)

What were your favorite books as a child?
Mysteries.  (Although, I should say Mark Twain because I grew up in Elmira, NY).

If you could meet any writer, dead or alive, who would it be?  What would you want to know?
I would like to (re)meet Louise Rosenblatt.  I attended a presentation where she, at age 98, stood up, shook her fist, and reprimanded the audience of educators for not making our voices heard to policy makers, and I, no doubt, would benefit from her insights about current education policy. I’d also like her recommendations for ways that I can help my students understand how and why she preferred her transaction theory of reading not to be confused with reader response theory.

Do you have a favorite book?  What is it and why is it your favorite?
My favorite book is To Kill a Mockingbird. I make it a point to reread it every year or so.

Do you want to learn more about the reading habits of a Geneseo Faculty member? Let us know by emailing Tracy Paradis at [email protected]

Connecting the Dots: Open Access and Open Educational Resources

Join Milne Library in our celebration of International Open Access Week, October 22-26, 2012!

Cable Green of Creative Commons and Nicole Allen at Student PIRGs gave an Open Educational Resources (OER) the once-over, diving into the basics of OERs, the relevance of OERs to the library community and the intersections of OER and Open Access.

October 25, 2012
4:00 PM
Milne 208

Open Access Week is now in its sixth year, and offers an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access. Our goal is to inspire wider participation in making Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research, so come to connect and discuss the Open Access (OA) movement and its impact on teaching, scholarship and research.

Peer Review and Open Access Panel Discussion

Join Milne Library in our celebration of International Open Access Week, October 22-26, 2012!

Geneseo faculty members Jane Morse, Gregg Hartvigsen and Brian Morgan will meet to discuss the similarities and differences between the peer review process for open access and “traditional” subscription publications.

Wednesday, October 24, 2012
1:00-2:00 PM
Milne 208

Open Access Week is now in its sixth year, and offers an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access. Our goal is to inspire wider participation in making Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research, so come to connect and discuss the Open Access (OA) movement and its impact on teaching, scholarship and research.

Faculty Bookshelf: Interview with Andrew Herman

The first in a series of interviews with SUNY Geneseo faculty on their reading interests, today’s “Faculty Bookshelf” starts off with Andrew Herman, Associate Professor and Chair of the Communication department.

Faculty Bookshelf: Andrew Herman, Communications

What are some current research interests?
I’m currently working with two Milne librarians to study the effects of teaching plagiarism in the classroom.  Depending on the type of instruction they are given – is it positive?  Is it negative? – does that translate to how motivated they are to cite sources when they are writing papers?  What is the intrinsic motivation behind citations?  Can we as instructors provide more motivation to get students to cite? 

What is your favorite literary genre to read for pleasure?
Hmmm….I don’t have a particular genre I follow, I mostly read fiction, but I also like biographies.

What book is on your nightstand now?
You mean my “metaphorical” nightstand, right?  The Bible is always there, and I’m currently reading (or trying to read!) The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak.  It’s a novel set during World War II about a little girl who steals books and is narrated by Death.  I’m also trying to read the second book in the Hunger Games trilogy, Catching Fire, since I’m reading the first one with my family.

Tell me about a book that changed your life and why:
The Bible greatly influenced and changed the direction of my life.  In high school I read George Orwell’s 1984 and Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, two influential books, but it wasn’t until college and my MA program when I read Neil Postman’s Amusing Ourselves to Death that I realized their impact.  I read passages in Postman’s book about Orwell’s 1984 and was struck by the opposition to the Orwell text, but also the startling similarities to Huxley’s Brave New World.   Postman’s book examines our level of indifference as a society, much like Huxley, which is a contrast to the totalitarian government found in Orwell.  These books changed how I viewed society.

What were your favorite books as a child?
I was a big fan of the Horatio Hornblower series of books by C.S. Forester. The books are about a British Royal Naval officer, set in the early nineteenth century.  I also loved Lost Horizon, an older novel about a plane crash and the protagonist’s discovery of a utopian society in Tibet.

Know of any faculty members we should interview for Faculty Bookshelf?  Contact Tracy Paradis with suggestions!