Advanced Database Searching: Improve Your Search Results

GOLD.AdvancedSearvhingPlease bring a laptop to the workshop!

Leaders, scholars, and professionals all have one thing in common: they have complex information needs. This workshop will teach participants to leverage the power of online search tools by applying filters, citation tracking, and other techniques rarely used by casual researchers. You’ll be expert researchers after this workshop!
Instructors: Bonnie Swoger – Library Faculty, Milne Library; Sue Ann Brainard – Library Faculty, Milne Library

Tuesday, October 25th
1:00 – 2:00 pm
GOLD Leadership Center,
MacVittie College Union, Room 114

[Register for Ruby Certificate Credit]

Basic Database Searching Workshop

"Although I did know about some methods of research already this workshop introduced me to even more effective methods that will be extremely helpful." Paula M.

“Although I did know about some methods of research already this workshop introduced me to even more effective methods that will be extremely helpful.” Paula M.

Please bring a laptop to the workshop!

Great leaders gather information and critically analyze the facts before making good decisions. Attendees at this workshop will discover helpful tips and strategies that are used in any kind of database to help improve their searches, save time and determine the best quality resources for their research.  Instructor: Dan Ross – Academic Excellence, Milne Library

Basic Database Searching*  
Monday, September 12th
2:30 – 3:30 pm |
MacVittie College Union Room 322/323

[Register for Ruby Certificate Credit] *Required Workshop

Update: Database issue workaround

foxtatobelieves

Update: My apologies for the wait on this workaround. I’ve been in close contact with the technical team at EBSCO to find the source of the problem.

You can access EBSCO databases using this link, which will get you to our A-Z list. All the links in our Subject Guides will work as well.

As always, please let me know if something isn’t working for you. Research is a messy process, but it’s my job to minimize frustration from working in different resources. Good luck with finals, and remember: tiny foxtato believes in you. You can do the thing!

-Angela Galvan

 

Original post follows –

//

Milne library subscribes to several dozen EBSCO databases. Reported problems range from slow load times to complete inability to access resources.

We know this impacts heavily used resources at Geneseo. We are in contact with EBSCO and will provide updates as we receive them.

Databases affected include, but are not limited to:
  • Academic Search Complete
  • America: History & Life
  • Anthropology Plus
  • Business Source Complete
  • CINAHL Plus with Full Text
  • Education Source
  • Environment Complete
  • ERIC
  • GeoRef
  • Historical Abstracts
  • Humanities Source
  • MEDLINE with Full Text
  • Military & Government Collection
  • MLA International Bibliography
  • Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection
  • Religion and Philosophy Collection
  • Social Sciences Full Text
  • Teacher Reference Center
 Update

Angela Galvan, Digital Resources & Systems Librarian

AngelaPerhaps you’ve noticed a new face or two here in Milne Library? As of September 10th, Angela Galvan is our new Digital Resources & Systems Librarian. She will be working in the Information Technology Services (ITS) department and is the lead administrator for our discovery services, collection of digital resources and our electronic resource management systems.  Angela has an extensive background in resource sharing and ILLiad management, in addition to other systems work.  Angela comes to us from the Ohio State University Health Sciences Library in Columbus, where she was Head of Interlibrary Services and Digital Reformatting Specialist.  Prior to that, she worked for Mount Carmel Health Sciences Library, also in Columbus. She is a fellow at this year’s Digital Library Federation Forum.

So what, exactly, does a “Digital Resources & Systems Librarian” do, you ask? We asked Angela this very question and she replied, “… in essence I establish, monitor, and further integrate digital resources and systems. This requires understanding everything that happens in the library, from circulation, to IDS activity, to how people search our materials, to how they’re taught in classrooms. In a practical sense, I’ve done well when users find what they’re looking for and don’t spend as much time struggling to learn an interface.  It’s one of those jobs where, when done well, no one notices because everything runs efficiently.”

Her interests are varied and include being “something of a gamer,” writing, and crafting handmade soap. Originally from Portland, Oregon, Angela is happy to have landed here in rural Western New York with her cat, Hallie, an 8-year-old domestic shorthair, and a rescue.

Hallie.bestcatever

She holds an MLIS from Kent State University, where she researched digital memorials and the impact of technology on bereavement. This area of study came about after a friend passed away suddenly and Angela found herself in a curious intersection of personal and professional demands; dealing with thanatosensitive materials. The concept of “thanatosensitivity ” is used to describe an approach that actively integrates the facts of mortality, dying, and death into HCI (human-computer interaction) research and design. She presented on the topic at Code4Lib Midwest and recommends Dying, Death, and Mortality: Towards Thanatosensitivity in HCI as one of the better papers on thanatosensitive information management.

Kanopy Streaming Video

KanopyHere’s a new resource to get excited about!

Milne library has recently acquired Kanopy; an on-demand streaming video service for educational institutions that provides access to more than 26,000 films. Over 80 subject areas range from Global Studies & Languages to the Arts, to Education (K-12); Technical Training to Career Development to LGBT.

Kanopy works directly with filmmakers and film distribution companies to offer award-winning collections including titles from PBS, BBC, Criterion Collection, Media Education Foundation and more.

KanGuide

The site is pretty intuitive, but we’ve put together a guide that explains not only how to use the resource, but also how faculty might embed materials into myCourses for their classes, as well as pointing out features like transcripts and playlists.

Take it for a spin and let us know what your experience is. Is this something you’ll use? We want to know!

Getting the Most From Google Scholar, or, Squirrels are Friends, not Food

SquirrelScholarEditor’s Note: This guest post was written by Geneseo alum and former Milne Library intern Margaret Craft, when she was a senior here last year. It’s always good to revisit this information!

I’m sure when you think of Google, you think of fuzzy dogs, craigs list, and the strange questions Google helpfully fills in for you, including

and the deepest most applicable question lingering at our core:

When can you eat squirrel?

…which a truly desperate college student on Geneseo’s campus might start to wonder, as the meal plan dwindles and you keep losing staring contests. (Vegans: it’s okay. Keep reading, it gets better, maybe.)

Squirrel

Day after day, eventually you start to wonder what you couldn’t eat those little buggers on. Pizza? Other squirrels?

This might require some research. For all you know, studies at Geneseo may have found a significant portion of squirrels have secret identities and should therefore be protected, not baked.

Superhero squirrel

What you, the savvy Geneseo student, would thus benefit from using is the mind-bogglingly awesome part of Google devoted to this need, sneakily hidden under products. Yes, indeed this grail of searching is none other than GOOGLE SCHOLAR, a versatile research tool that looks for your search terms in articles, patents, and book citations.

On the homepage it tries to be modest and say it only looks for articles, but it will search for books as well. Such results will appear with a [BOOK] designation at the beginning of the citation.

Once you’ve typed a search term in, such as “squirrel,” you’ll be shown a master list of all results.

Google Scholar search results

You may note that the third result on the list concerns movement representations in squirrel monkeys, which, while adorable are not a viable food source on Geneseo’s campus and thus not your concern.

To get rid of squirrel monkey results, you can exclude the word “monkey” in the advanced search. Clicking on the arrow next to the search box pulls up the advanced search functions.

Advanced search

To get rid of squirrel monkey results, you can exclude the word “monkey”:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.26.42 PM

You can further narrow results down by using the exact phrase option:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.26.34 PM

and now the top result (no superhero squirrel research in sight, sadly) based on my choice to sort by relevancy  is:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.28.08 PM

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.31.59 PMBummer. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a not so fun thing where your brain degenerates through infection by proteins called prions. Apparently it is possible to contract the disease through eating the brains of squirrels that are infected with these prions. However, when I look at more recent results by asking Google to only look for results in the last 14 years, I get this article, which is directly available for free through the link for Springer at the right:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.32.13 PM

It concludes that it is unlikely that infectious prions will appear in red squirrels. Whew. But maybe we have gray squirrels…

Underneath the citation and excerpt, you can see how many times it has been cited, none in this case, and how many websites have the full text available (All 11 versions). The link for “Related articles” at the far left will show related materials that includes others more recent than this article, these may include other types of squirrels. There is also the option to cite the article directly or save it to “my library,” which is a personalized memory bank that will keep track of citations you’re interested in.

Now the varied danger of eating squirrel brains is corroborated by another article that talks about more than just red squirrels:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.35.38 PM

It has been cited by 11 other more recent articles, which could be useful for further research into the topic. Additionally, there is no link to a free version to the right of the citation, meaning none of the 8 versions showed are available for free download. Boo.

You could cry, but wait! There should be, if you are on Geneseo’s wifi network or using an on-campus computer, a “Get It” link to the right of all articles. It may also be listed under “More” under the citation as well. This will take you to the glorious IDS request page, which should get you the article within 48 hours! REJOICE PEOPLE.

And if you are not on-campus, there is an alternative. Click “Settings” on this menu:

Google Scholar settings

What will appear is this:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.39.04 PM

Type, as I have, SUNY Geneseo and hit search.  Check the box next to “Milne Library, SUNY Geneseo – Get it”.

Now hit “Save” and you will return to your search.  Now when you look to the right of a citation, you should see the Get It next to it, or More below the citation itself.

Happy searching*!

*Just remember to research before you eat. You never know.

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.40.46 PM

*Vegans: it’s okay. Keep reading, it gets better.

 

New Access to Experian’s Credit Data Reports

business_research-400x300Our ABI/INFORM database now has access to the Experian Commercial Risk Database, containing over 40 million credit data reports for both private and public companies, allowing researchers to see details such as contact information, size, industry, MSA, sales range, business type, bankruptcy information, credit risk, and more. These reports are full-text with coverage from December 10, 1980 to the present.

ABI/INFORM can be found under recommended databases on both the Business/Economics and Accounting/Auditing library research guides.

To find these reports, search ABI/INFORM for a company (e.g.“Ford Motor company”), then limit to reports (or limit further to just experian reports under publication title).

FindingExperianReports_ABI-INFORM

For more info on the new content, see the announcement on ProQuest’s blog.

Changes to NOVELNY subscription databases

NovelNYNOVELNY has replaced the databases Primary Search, Searchasaurus, and Kids’ Search with Kids InfoBits, and eLibrary Elementary.

infobitsKids InfoBits is a database created for students in Kindergarten through Grade 5. “It features a developmentally appropriate, visually graphic interface, a subject-based topic tree search and full-text, age-appropriate, curriculum-related magazine, newspaper and reference content for information on current events, the arts, science, health, people, government, history, sports and more” (Kids InfoBits, 2013).

For information on how to use this site visit the following tutorials:

_______________________________________________________

eLibELE_AnimWIDEeLibrary Elementary is “the ultimate elementary full-text reference resource — tailors all the media types and search functionality of eLibrary for the young reader and researcher. It’s an easy-to-use general reference database designed specifically to engage and guide younger students” (eLibrary Elementary, 2013).

For information on how to use this database visit the following tutorial

eLibrary Elementary [online image]. (2013). Retrieved August 22, 2013, http://www.proquestk12.com/productinfo/elibrary.shtml
eLibrary Elementary (2013). Retrieved from http://www.proquestk12.com/productinfo/elibrary_elementary.shtml
Kids InfoBits [online image]. (2013). Retrieved August 22, 2013, http://galesupport.com/novelny/#
Kids InfoBits (2013). Retrieved from http://www.gale.cengage.com/InfoBits/

Hacking Scopus: Finding Journal Articles in the Sciences and Social Sciences

HScopusHere at Geneseo, Scopus is your go-to source for finding scholarly articles in the sciences (biology, chemistry, geological sciences, physics astronomy, mathematics, etc.) and social sciences (psychology, communication, sociology, etc.)  There are other tools that provide more depth coverage in some of these disciplines, but Scopus is often a good start.

Here are a few tips and tricks to help you get the most out of this high quality resource.

First, take advantage of the built in filtering tools.

Most folks start with a broad search with just a couple of search terms:

squirrels and hibernation

And you often get lots of results – too many to actually look through.  So take advantage of the filtering tools in Scopus.  On the right hand side, click on the arrow next to the “keyword” heading.  Click “View more” a couple of times and you are left with a list of terms.  Scopus has analyzed your search results and counted up the keywords identified by the article authors.  You can click one or more of these boxes to filter your results to get a smaller set of articles.  This keyword filter can also act as a useful tool to help you narrow down a project topic.

Scopus keyword filtering

Second, let Scopus help you make connections between different pieces of the scholarly literature.

Journal articles don’t live in a vacuum.  The results, experiments and studies discussed in each article have roots in the results, experiments and studies of other researchers.  It’s how the scholarly enterprise works.

The first thing to do is the check out the bibliography of a promising journal article. You can do this once you get your hands on the article, but Scopus can give you a head start, especially for articles you need to order through IDS.  Just click on the title of any article and scroll to the bottom to see the bibliography and convenient “Get It” buttons for journal articles.

Scopus References

 

Next, you want to find out which other scholars thought that your promising article was important enough to their research to cite in their bibliography.  In Scopus, scroll to the top of the page for the article, then click on the number in the “Cited by” box.  Here you can browse a list of articles that cited your original article.

Scopus Cited By

Tracking citations in this way is a great way to find additional sources, and it can often make connecting those sources easier.

Third, take advantage of the “Related Documents” box that appears on the right hand side of each article page in Scopus.  For each article listed, Scopus analyzes its bibliography and finds other articles that cite the same sources.

Scopus Related

 

Hopefully these tips and tricks will help you use Scopus more efficiently so you can find your references and get started with your projects faster.

What are your favorite Scopus tools?

Mobile Library Resources

MobileResearchAccording to research done by the Pew Research Center, 66% of Americans age 18-29 own a smartphone. For those of you with smartphones, tablets or other mobile devices, there are many library resources that are available for you to explore on the go.

You can start with the library’s mobile website, which gives you access to library hours and phone numbers for the service desk and library staff. Then there are a wide variety of mobile websites to help with quick look ups, or to get you started on your research. Milne Library’s Guide to Mobile Resources can help you find resources formatted for your mobile device, and all of our subject guides are easily viewable on your smartphone (although the resources they point to may not be as accessible).

MobileGuideThese mobile websites will help you find books or articles in Milne Library (either online or in print):

  • Library Home Page (mobile) – Library hours, staff contact information, and links to common resources formatted for your mobile device
  • GLOCAT+ (mobile) – Find books and articles available to Milne Library patrons.
  • GLOCAT Classic (Mobile) – Find books, DVDs, CDs and other items from Milne’s collection. Great for quickly looking up call numbers.
  • Worldcat (mobile) – Find books in libraries worldwide. Enter a zip code to find an item in a local library

    A few useful apps for research.

    A few useful apps for research.

Many of our databases also have mobile websites.  If you have accounts for these databases, you can access your saved articles, citations and lists.

Other vendors create separate mobile apps that you can download and use on your phones or tablets.

ArtStorMobile

ArtStor Mobile app image search

              • EBSCOhost for iOS – Provides access to Milne’s EBSCOhost subscriptions in a dedicated app for your iPhone, iPod Touch, or iPad. Includes the ability to save PDFs to outside apps, such as Google Drive, Dropbox or iBooks.
              • iSSRN – Provided by the Social Science Research Network, iSSRN provides access on your iPhone or iPad to a huge amount of freely-available literature in the social sciences and humanities.
              • NML for iOS – Naxos Music Library for iOS
              • ARTstor Mobile
              • ACS Mobile – Free. Access recently published and resources from the American Chemical Society.
              • arXiv  – Free. Full text access to the pre-prints available at the arXiv.org website in Physics, Mathematics, Nonlinear Sciences, Computer Science, Quantitative Biology, Quantitative Finance, and Statistics.
      • SciVerse ScienceDirect Premium  – $2.99 per year. Full text access to the articles available on ScienceDirect, from the publisher Elsevier. iPad only.
      • SciVerse Scopus Alerts (Institutional)  – Free. Search science and social science literature, get citation alerts and create lists of articles. Users are required to sign up for an account at the Scopus website in order to authenticate.
      • World Bank DataFinder  – Free. Access World Bank Data from your phone.
      • US Census Browser  – iPad only. Browse data from the US 2010 Census.

Then you’ll want to get your hands on the apps that can help you get your work done.  There are apps to work with citation management tools like Zotero and Mendeley, and apps to help you access documents stored in Google Drive.  The EasyBib app allows you to scan the barcode of a book to automatically create a citation you can email to yourself.

While doing your research on your phone probably won’t replace hard-care searching on your computer, it is often convenient to have mobile tools to help with quick look ups or searches.

What apps or mobile resources do you use to do research?