Getting the Most From Google Scholar, or, Squirrels are Friends, not Food

Editor’s Note: This guest post was written by Geneseo senior and Milne Library intern Margaret Craft.

I’m sure when you think of Google, you think of fuzzy dogs, craigs list, and the strange questions Google helpfully fills in for you, including

and the deepest most applicable question lingering at our core:

when can you eat squirrel?

which a truly desperate college student on Geneseo’s campus might start to wonder, as the meal plan dwindles and you keep losing staring contests. (Vegans: it’s okay. Keep reading, it gets better, maybe.)

Squirrel

Day after day, eventually you start to wonder what you couldn’t eat those little buggers on. Pizza? Other squirrels?

This might require some research. For all you know, studies at Geneseo may have found a significant portion of squirrels have secret identities and should therefore be protected, not baked.

Superhero squirrel

What you, the savvy Geneseo student, would thus benefit from using is the mind-bogglingly awesome part of Google devoted to this need, sneakily hidden under products. Yes, indeed this grail of searching is none other than GOOGLE SCHOLAR, a versatile research tool that looks for your search terms in articles, patents, and book citations.

On the homepage it tries to be modest and say it only looks for articles, but it will search for books as well. Such results will appear with a [BOOK] designation at the beginning of the citation.

Once you’ve typed a search term in, such as “squirrel,” you’ll be shown a master list of all results.

Google Scholar search results

You may note that the third result on the list concerns movement representations in squirrel monkeys, which, while adorable are not a viable food source on Geneseo’s campus and thus not your concern.

To get rid of squirrel monkey results, you can exclude the word “monkey” in the advanced search. Clicking on the arrow next to the search box pulls up the advanced search functions.

Advanced search

To get rid of squirrel monkey results, you can exclude the word “monkey”:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.26.42 PM

You can further narrow results down by using the exact phrase option:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.26.34 PM

and now the top result (no superhero squirrel research in sight, sadly) based on my choice to sort by relevancy  is:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.28.08 PM

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.31.59 PMBummer. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a not so fun thing where your brain degenerates through infection by proteins called prions. Apparently it is possible to contract the disease through eating the brains of squirrels that are infected with these prions. However, when I look at more recent results by asking Google to only look for results in the last 14 years, I get this article, which is directly available for free through the link for Springer at the right:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.32.13 PM

It concludes that it is unlikely that infectious prions will appear in red squirrels. Whew. But maybe we have gray squirrels…

Underneath the citation and excerpt, you can see how many times it has been cited, none in this case, and how many websites have the full text available (All 11 versions). The link for “Related articles” at the far left will show related materials that includes others more recent than this article, these may include other types of squirrels. There is also the option to cite the article directly or save it to “my library,” which is a personalized memory bank that will keep track of citations you’re interested in.

Now the varied danger of eating squirrel brains is corroborated by another article that talks about more than just red squirrels:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.35.38 PM

It has been cited by 11 other more recent articles, which could be useful for further research into the topic. Additionally, there is no link to a free version to the right of the citation, meaning none of the 8 versions showed are available for free download. Boo.

You could cry, but wait! There should be, if you are on Geneseo’s wifi network or using an on-campus computer, a “Get It” link to the right of all articles. It may also be listed under “More” under the citation as well. This will take you to the glorious IDS request page, which should get you the article within 48 hours! REJOICE PEOPLE.

And if you are not on-campus, there is an alternative. Click “Settings” on this menu:

Google Scholar settings

What will appear is this:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.39.04 PM

Type, as I have, SUNY Geneseo and hit search.  Check the box next to “Milne Library, SUNY Geneseo – Get it”.

Now hit “Save” and you will return to your search.  Now when you look to the right of a citation, you should see the Get It next to it, or More below the citation itself.

Happy searching*!

*Just remember to research before you eat. You never know.

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.40.46 PM

*Vegans: it’s okay. Keep reading, it gets better.

Changes to NOVELNY subscription databases

NovelNYNOVELNY has replaced the databases Primary Search, Searchasaurus, and Kids’ Search with Kids InfoBits, and eLibrary Elementary.

infobitsKids InfoBits is a database created for students in Kindergarten through Grade 5. “It features a developmentally appropriate, visually graphic interface, a subject-based topic tree search and full-text, age-appropriate, curriculum-related magazine, newspaper and reference content for information on current events, the arts, science, health, people, government, history, sports and more” (Kids InfoBits, 2013).

For information on how to use this site visit the following tutorials:

_______________________________________________________

eLibELE_AnimWIDEeLibrary Elementary is “the ultimate elementary full-text reference resource — tailors all the media types and search functionality of eLibrary for the young reader and researcher. It’s an easy-to-use general reference database designed specifically to engage and guide younger students” (eLibrary Elementary, 2013).

For information on how to use this database visit the following tutorial

eLibrary Elementary [online image]. (2013). Retrieved August 22, 2013, http://www.proquestk12.com/productinfo/elibrary.shtml
eLibrary Elementary (2013). Retrieved from http://www.proquestk12.com/productinfo/elibrary_elementary.shtml
Kids InfoBits [online image]. (2013). Retrieved August 22, 2013, http://galesupport.com/novelny/#
Kids InfoBits (2013). Retrieved from http://www.gale.cengage.com/InfoBits/

Hacking Scopus: Finding Journal Articles in the Sciences and Social Sciences

HScopusHere at Geneseo, Scopus is your go-to source for finding scholarly articles in the sciences (biology, chemistry, geological sciences, physics astronomy, mathematics, etc.) and social sciences (psychology, communication, sociology, etc.)  There are other tools that provide more depth coverage in some of these disciplines, but Scopus is often a good start.

Here are a few tips and tricks to help you get the most out of this high quality resource.

First, take advantage of the built in filtering tools.

Most folks start with a broad search with just a couple of search terms:

squirrels and hibernation

And you often get lots of results – too many to actually look through.  So take advantage of the filtering tools in Scopus.  On the right hand side, click on the arrow next to the “keyword” heading.  Click “View more” a couple of times and you are left with a list of terms.  Scopus has analyzed your search results and counted up the keywords identified by the article authors.  You can click one or more of these boxes to filter your results to get a smaller set of articles.  This keyword filter can also act as a useful tool to help you narrow down a project topic.

Scopus keyword filtering

Second, let Scopus help you make connections between different pieces of the scholarly literature.

Journal articles don’t live in a vacuum.  The results, experiments and studies discussed in each article have roots in the results, experiments and studies of other researchers.  It’s how the scholarly enterprise works.

The first thing to do is the check out the bibliography of a promising journal article. You can do this once you get your hands on the article, but Scopus can give you a head start, especially for articles you need to order through IDS.  Just click on the title of any article and scroll to the bottom to see the bibliography and convenient “Get It” buttons for journal articles.

Scopus References

 

Next, you want to find out which other scholars thought that your promising article was important enough to their research to cite in their bibliography.  In Scopus, scroll to the top of the page for the article, then click on the number in the “Cited by” box.  Here you can browse a list of articles that cited your original article.

Scopus Cited By

Tracking citations in this way is a great way to find additional sources, and it can often make connecting those sources easier.

Third, take advantage of the “Related Documents” box that appears on the right hand side of each article page in Scopus.  For each article listed, Scopus analyzes its bibliography and finds other articles that cite the same sources.

Scopus Related

 

Hopefully these tips and tricks will help you use Scopus more efficiently so you can find your references and get started with your projects faster.

What are your favorite Scopus tools?

Mobile Library Resources

MobileResearchAccording to research done by the Pew Research Center, 66% of Americans age 18-29 own a smartphone. For those of you with smartphones, tablets or other mobile devices, there are many library resources that are available for you to explore on the go.

You can start with the library’s mobile website, which gives you access to library hours and phone numbers for the service desk and library staff. Then there are a wide variety of mobile websites to help with quick look ups, or to get you started on your research. Milne Library’s Guide to Mobile Resources can help you find resources formatted for your mobile device, and all of our subject guides are easily viewable on your smartphone (although the resources they point to may not be as accessible).

MobileGuideThese mobile websites will help you find books or articles in Milne Library (either online or in print):

  • Library Home Page (mobile) - Library hours, staff contact information, and links to common resources formatted for your mobile device
  • GLOCAT+ (mobile) - Find books and articles available to Milne Library patrons.
  • GLOCAT Classic (Mobile) - Find books, DVDs, CDs and other items from Milne’s collection. Great for quickly looking up call numbers.
  • Worldcat (mobile) - Find books in libraries worldwide. Enter a zip code to find an item in a local library

    A few useful apps for research.

    A few useful apps for research.

Many of our databases also have mobile websites.  If you have accounts for these databases, you can access your saved articles, citations and lists.

Other vendors create separate mobile apps that you can download and use on your phones or tablets.

ArtStorMobile

ArtStor Mobile app image search

              • EBSCOhost for iOS - Provides access to Milne’s EBSCOhost subscriptions in a dedicated app for your iPhone, iPod Touch, or iPad. Includes the ability to save PDFs to outside apps, such as Google Drive, Dropbox or iBooks.
              • iSSRN - Provided by the Social Science Research Network, iSSRN provides access on your iPhone or iPad to a huge amount of freely-available literature in the social sciences and humanities.
              • NML for iOS - Naxos Music Library for iOS
              • ARTstor Mobile
              • ACS Mobile - Free. Access recently published and resources from the American Chemical Society.
              • arXiv  - Free. Full text access to the pre-prints available at the arXiv.org website in Physics, Mathematics, Nonlinear Sciences, Computer Science, Quantitative Biology, Quantitative Finance, and Statistics.
      • SciVerse ScienceDirect Premium  - $2.99 per year. Full text access to the articles available on ScienceDirect, from the publisher Elsevier. iPad only.
      • SciVerse Scopus Alerts (Institutional)  - Free. Search science and social science literature, get citation alerts and create lists of articles. Users are required to sign up for an account at the Scopus website in order to authenticate.
      • World Bank DataFinder  - Free. Access World Bank Data from your phone.
      • US Census Browser  - iPad only. Browse data from the US 2010 Census.

Then you’ll want to get your hands on the apps that can help you get your work done.  There are apps to work with citation management tools like Zotero and Mendeley, and apps to help you access documents stored in Google Drive.  The EasyBib app allows you to scan the barcode of a book to automatically create a citation you can email to yourself.

While doing your research on your phone probably won’t replace hard-care searching on your computer, it is often convenient to have mobile tools to help with quick look ups or searches.

What apps or mobile resources do you use to do research?

The truth, the truth! My kingdom for the truth!

Richard III

Richard III

Last month news story headlines all over the world confirmed that bones exhumed from under a parking lot in Leicester, England, are those of Richard III, King of England from 1483–1485. Last of the Plantagenet dynasty that had ruled England since 1154, Richard was killed—the last English king to die in battle—fighting the forces of Henry Tudor, who became Henry VII and the founder of the Tudor ruling line.

So what? This was over 500 years ago. Besides, Richard III was a bad king and a worse human being. Now if it was King Arthur’s bones that had been discovered… But actually, Richard III—or more accurately, the image most people have of Richard—is surprisingly relevant to our time. We think of political spin as something from modern times, but in reality, it’s been going on for centuries.

Thanks primarily  to William Shakespeare, Richard is best known as one of history’s great villains, responsible for (at least) usurping the throne, murdering his two nephews, having lustful designs on his own niece, and committing other random murders along the way. He also was hunchbacked, limped, and had a withered arm and squinty eyes.

PluckingEDIT

William Shakespeare’s version of the splitting of nobles into the factions of York and Lancaster, sparking the Wars of the Roses in 15th-century England.
Artist: Henry Arthur Payne (1868–1940).
Image credit: Wikimedia Commons, public domain

The problem with the popular notion of Richard is that much, if not most to all of it, is untrue. In the time period Shakespeare was writing, Henry Tudor’s granddaughter, Elizabeth I, was on the English throne. Shakespeare would have certainly been aware that pleasing the monarch was the best way to success (including keeping one’s head attached to one’s shoulders), so he would have been extremely unlikely to write anything positive about the man Elizabeth’s grandfather had killed. The sources that Shakespeare drew upon in writing Richard III were similarly biased. John Rous, a chronicler writing  during Richard’s reign, lauded Richard as a good king with a good heart, who stood up for the common man. But after Richard’s death and the ascension of Henry VII, Rous described Richard as physically deformed and born with teeth and shoulder-length hair after spending two years in the womb. Other chroniclers took that description and ran with it…but in the process Richard’s supposedly withered arm moved from his right to his left. Oops. And portraits of Richard have, upon examination, revealed evidence of repainting to add uneven shoulders and squinty eyes. Double oops.

Similarly, most supposed murders by Richard took place during the reign of Richard’s older brother, Edward IV, and there is no evidence linking Richard with either planning or executing them. The two that did occur during Richard’s reign were both cases of treason, which was punishable by death. The only uncertain case is central to the idea of Richard as villain, though—the murders of his young nephews, commonly known as the Princes in the Tower, and one of the most famous unsolved historical mysteries.

Princes in the Tower

“The Princes in the Tower”
Artist: John Everett Millais (1829-1896)
Image credit: Wikimedia Commons, public domain

The popular image of the princes is two young boys, one an anointed king, imprisoned in the infamous Tower of London and later secretly killed, either by Richard himself or on his orders, to preserve his usurpation of the English throne. The reality is much more complicated and involves a secret marriage, a possible secret betrothal, possible illegitimacy, power-hungry courtiers, and bitter divisions between the two major “parties” of the time. Briefly, Edward IV, from the Yorkist branch of the royal family, secretly married a woman named Elizabeth Woodville, whose family members were placed in positions of power in any way possible, causing major resentment of the entire Woodville family. After Edward IV’s death in April 1483, the former chancellor for Edward, a bishop of the Church, came forward and claimed that Edward had been betrothed to another woman before marrying Elizabeth. In those days a betrothal, or plight-troth, was as binding as a marriage; thus, Edward’s marriage to Elizabeth was invalid and all of their children, including the two princes, were illegitimate. Consequently, as Edward’s younger brother, Richard was the closest legitimate heir to the throne.

Before the bishop’s revelation, Edward’s older son, also named Edward, had gone to  the Tower of London, which at that time was not only a prison, but contained living quarters. (Traditionally, heirs to the throne lived there before their coronations.) Elizabeth Woodville soon allowed Edward’s younger brother to join him. The boys were seen playing outside during the summer of 1483, but by late fall rumors were circulating that the boys were dead. The only certainty is that they were not seen alive after the summer of 1483.

There are others suspected of murdering the princes. Henry Stafford, the Duke of Buckingham, had initially supported Richard against the Woodville family, but less than six months later led a rebellion against Richard. Henry Stafford was related to the Yorkist royal family and potentially had his eye on the throne, and removing any potential claimants to the throne, even illegitimate sons, would have been in his interest. Henry Tudor was distantly related to the rival branch of the royal family, the Lancastrians, but his claim was tainted for two reasons: it was through a female line of descent, and it was through illegitimacy. Because of these reasons, Henry Tudor’s claim to the throne was very tenuous, and he would have had even stronger reasons for wanting rival claimants to the crown removed.

Richard nearly defeated Henry Tuor at the Battle of Bosworth Field in August 1485. Henry was saved only by the treachery of one of Richard’s supporters, who turned his army against Richard’s during the battle, and by multiple fighters of Henry’s own household, who brought Richard down after Richard’s single-minded charge across the battlefield almost reached Henry himself, coming so close as to kill Henry’s standard-bearer. Henry’s troops hacked and defiled Richard’s body, which was then buried with no ceremony in the grounds of Greyfriars’ Church in nearby Leicester. During the Dissolution under Henry’s son, Henry VIII, the church was destroyed. For a long time it was thought that Richard’s body had been disinterred and thrown into the River Soar.

In the end, history was written by the winner. Henry Tudor became Henry VII, married Elizabeth of York, the eldest daughter of Edward IV, and subsumed all claims to the English throne into his own family. Under the rule of Henry VII and Henry VIII, most of the male members of the House of York were executed, removing any possibility that a York might claim the throne. Chroniclers of the era painted Richard with the blackest of brushes to further delegitimize the House of York and appeal to the Tudor family. These are the sources upon which Shakespeare drew to write Richard III, and these are what have shaped Richard’s reputation over the last five centuries. Five centuries from now, what sources will historians of that time be using to write the history of today—and how truthful will they be?

lions

If you’re interested in reading more about Richard III, Milne Library has some great resources! Check GLOCAT Classic for copies of Shakespeare’s Richard III, both in print and in video form, as well as a wide range of sources about the history of late 15th-century England and Richard’s reign, by searching for “Richard III” OR “Richard the Third.” (Be sure to use the quotation marks to ensure that the search engine looks for “Richard” and “III” or “the Third” together as a phrase!) And while two excellent historical novels about Richard III aren’t part of the library’s holdings, you can use interlibrary loan through IDS (available from the library’s homepage under the tab labeled “Requests and Services”) to find copies of Sharon Kay Penman’s thoroughly researched The Sunne in Splendour and Elizabeth Peters’ lighthearted yet historically accurate mystery novel The Murders of Richard III. RichardSunneFor information on the discovery and retrieval of Richard’s bones, and the ongoing argument as to where the skeleton will be interred, Lexis-Nexis (on the library’s homepage under “Popular Resources”) is the place to go for newspaper, magazine, and other current media stories from around the world. Searching on “Richard III” retrieves almost 1,000 stories; “Richard the Third” as a search term is less focused, mixing in stories about rugby players and such, but still retrieving some interesting stories. And for a look at the scholarly literature, Historical Abstracts, which can be found by using the “Find a resource by title” search box below “Popular Resources” on the library’s homepage, produces over 100 results, including articles on Richard himself, Shakespeare’s play, and the sources he drew on, especially Thomas More’s account of Richard’s life.

 

ArtStor upgrade may slow response time

SchedMaintPlease be advised that ARTstor will be performing an upgrade to their systems on Wednesday, January 23 between 9:00 AM and 1:00 PM EST. During this time, users will still be able to access the ARTstor Digital Library but may experience some slowness.

If you do experience any difficulties, please clear the cache on your browser and restart your web browser. If you continue to experience difficulties, please do not hesitate to contact Tracy Paradis at [email protected].

Ebooks on demand!

Starting this fall, Milne Library is pleased to offer ebooks on demand from EBL, a vendor specializing in scholarly and popular books. The current collection has access to over 5,000 titles, with majority of content published between 2011 and 2012.  Publishers include:  Ashgate Publishing, Blackwell, John Wiley & Sons, Princeton University Press, McFarland & Company and several others.

To access ebook titles, students, faculty and staff need only search GLOCAT+ for subject of their choice, then limit by Show content type to “Book/eBook”.

 

Once you have a list of results you will see a link for Full Text Online.  Click.

 

 

 
The link will take you to a drop-down menu where you will select SUNY Geneseo from the list of selected institutions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the next screen you will see information about the book title you selected; click Read Online and your table of contents for the book will appear.

 

 

 

As with print books, a loan is required before access to an ebook can be made available for an extended period of time.

Borrowing a book will activate full text access for the length of the loan (in most cases 1 day or 7 days) and enable you to copy and print from the books.

Note: To continue accessing the ebook once a loan has expired, simply create or request another loan as you did your initial loan.

 

If you want to download a title to your e-reader or computer, click on the Download tab on the lefthand menu; you will need to have Adobe Digital Editions installed for downloading content.

 

Read and enjoy!
Please contact Kate Pitcher, Collection Development Librarian, if you have any questions or comments about the ebook collection.

 

Business & Company Resource Center becomes Business Insights: Essentials.

 

Not only did Milne get some physical renovations over the summer, but one of our recommended Business Databases also got a make-over.

The database allows you to research and compare companies and industries using industry rankings, company profiles, market share data, investment reports, charts, graphs, and more.

Some of the new features in include:

  • New user-friendly interface
  • The ability to search across multiple data types from a single search box
  • Interactive charting: Manipulate statistical data and customize your own charts
  • Deep links within results that get the most relevant content in fewer clicks
  • New text-to-speech capabilities
  • Robust glossary with thousands of business terms

Check out the full details on what’s different from the old Business and Company Resource Center with this handy guide.

 

New Look, Same PsycINFO

While it is not our first choice to have the CSA databases like PsycINFO and Sociological Abstracts change, unfortunately the old CSA interface will be gone in March and we want to give faculty and students plenty of time to use and become accustomed to the new interface while the old one is still available . As we see so often with companies buying one another out, CSA purchased ProQuest around 2007 and is finally moving all their CSA interfaces to the new ProQuest platform so that all of their products have a similar look and feel.

PsycInfo will soon go from this:                                                          to this:

Remember, all links on the LibGuides and library website will be changed to the new interface, but links to the old interface through the LibGuides and library website  will be available through the end of March.

If you should encounter problems, please let us know immediately and we will look into it asap and get back to them with changes (if its possible.)

iPhone Apps for Research and Collaboration

If you’re like me, much of the time spent away from your laptop is spent checking your phone for news, email and new xkcd comics.  If you’re spending that much time on your phone, you might as well do something useful.

Check out the following free apps to help you search the literature, cite your sources, and organize your work.

iPhone Apps

iPhone apps for research and collaboration

Ebsco Databases – Ebsco provides access to a large number of databases via one app (ERIC, Georef, American History and Life, MLA International Bibliography, Business Source Complete, Academic Search Complete and lots of others).  Because access to these databases is paid for by the library (with your tuition dollars), you need to log in to Academic Search Complete via the library website first.  At the bottom of the screen you’ll click on a link that will send an email with an activation code.  After downloading the app, open your email on your phone and click on the link.  You will then have 9 months of access.  I’ve found this process to be pretty simple and easy – no need to log in every time.  The app will connect you to full text articles within the Ebsco databases, and even Geneseo’s “Get it” service for articles found elsewhere.

SciVerse Scopus Alerts – A search app for the interdisciplinary database Scopus.  This app can do keyword searching, citation tracking, and alerts for the science and social science literature.  Scopus is an outstanding database, but the app has some issues.  The biggest problem is getting it to work.  You need to remember your Scopus username and password (not your Geneseo username), and even then there can be trouble.  While the tech support is responsive, it just isn’t as easy to get started as the Ebsco app above.

Evernote – I recently started using this piece of software on my computer for note taking during meetings and lectures.  I am in love with its simplicity and universal usefulness.  Take class notes on your computer, then download the iPhone app to access them anywhere.  Record voice notes on your phone and automatically sync them to your laptop.  Take pictures with your phone and insert them into the notes you’ve already started, or start a new note.  The iPhone app syncs with the desktop application so that you never have to guess where a certain piece of information is.  Share notes with others via shared notebooks or simple weblinks.  I love this app.

Dropbox – Along with the Dropbox website, this tool allows you to easily share files among friends (with shared folders), or between your computer and phone.

EasyBib – An app from the popular website.  This app allows you to scan the barcode of a book and create a formatted citation (which you will, of course, check against the style manuals for accuracy).

Merriam Webster Dictionary – There are lots of dictionary apps out there.  This one is free, and has a nifty voice search function.

Mendeley – This app works with Mendeley Desktop and the Mendeley website.  It allows you to store and organize your PDF journal articles and book chapters.  It’s like iTunes for journal articles: Mendeley will organize your folders for you and you can create folders (playlists) of articles.  You can share those folders with others to help you collaborate on group projects.  The desktop version integrates with Microsoft word to help you cite your sources.  This mobile app allows you to access the journal PDFs you have synced to the web, as well as the ability to search your personal library.

Since I don’t have an Android phone, I can’t comment on the availability or usability of these apps on that platform.  Perhaps in another post.

What apps do you use to get your work done?