Publishing student work openly: the GREAT Day Proceedings

GREATDayEvery year, GREAT Day (Geneseo Recognizing Excellence, Achievement & Talent Day) marks a college-wide symposium celebrating the creative and scholarly endeavors of our students.

For the past several years, SUNY Geneseo has published the conference proceedings of the GREAT Day presentations held every April.  The proceedings are designed to be a student-led publication, compiled and edited by a series of student editors and originally advised by Dr. E. Richie VanVliet of the Languages & Literatures department.  In 2011 the publication found a home in Milne Library when Dr. Van Vliet retired. Since the 2011 Proceedings, Milne Library has worked with two wonderful student editors, Stephanie Iasiello and Amy Bishop, to compile and edit the student work from GREAT Day presentations and poster sessions.  In the spring of every year, the Library publishes the edited proceedings of the previous year’s event.

Beginning in 2009, the Proceedings were published in print through the Amazon CreateSpace platform, and in 2011, the Proceedings were also made open access and freely available electronically through Milne’s journal publishing platform, Open Journal Systems (OJS).  http://ojs.geneseo.edu

Student submissions for the 2013 Proceedings are in the process of being reviewed  for publication — you still have time to contribute your paper!  Submitting is easy, and instructions are found on our website. Please contact the GREAT Day Proceedings journal managers (Daniel Ross, Academic Excellence Librarian [email protected] or Allison Brown, Editor & Production Manager [email protected]) for more information.

THATCamp Western New York

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Register at wny2013.thatcamp.org

THATCamp Western New York 2013 will take place February 18-19, 2013 on the campus of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Join us for a two-day unconference of workshops and discussions on all forms of social reading, from open annotation (e.g., Candide 2.0The Open Utopia) to peer-to-peer review (e.g., Planned ObsolescenceComplex TV).

Code for America fellow Eddie Tejeda, the creator of Digress.it and the lead developer of Regulation Room, will be among the participants.

Registration is $20, and  includes breakfast and lunch both days, a Monday (2/18) evening reception, and a t-shirt.

Who should come to THATCamp Western New York?

THATCamp Western New York is for people interested in social reading as a tool for scholarship, pedagogy, or public engagement. Anyone is welcome to attend and propose a session.

What is THATCamp?

THATCamp is an unconference — an inexpensive, collaborative gathering in which participants create the agenda. It stands for “The Humanities and Technology Camp,” and explores the interactions between technology and humanities teaching and research. Learn more at thatcamp.org.

THATCamp Western New York 2013 is generously funded by an Innovative Instruction Technology Grant from the State University of New York.

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Geoscience rock collections go online with Omeka

The Geneseo Geosciences Collections website

Earlier this month, senior Geological Sciences major Amanda Lanik presented her work creating a digital catalog at the Geological Society of America annual meeting in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Amanda used the free open source digital content platform Omeka to create an online catalog of the rock samples used to teach petrology, the study of the origin and composition of rocks. The Omeka platform is quite versatile and has been used for many digital library projects around the world.

Working with geological sciences faculty and Milne Library staff, Amanda designed the site template, added rock data and uploaded pictures of the samples.

In her GSA presentation, Amanda described how the new catalog can be searched by rock name, time period or description.  Users can also browse individual rock suites and can find samples from particular locations by selecting locations on a map.

In the future, this online collection can be used by teachers and students to create custom collections of materials and make direct connections between rocks in the Geneseo collection and the geoscience literature.

The Geneseo Geosciences Collections website
The Geneseo Geosciences Collections website

The growing online collection can be viewed at the Geneseo Geosciences Collections site. The abstract of Amanda’s presentation, as well as additional links can also be found online.

Dr. Dori Farthing (Geological Sciences) and Bonnie Swoger (Milne Library) served as advisors on the project, with technical assistance from Milne Library’s Corey Ha and Joe Easterly.

Thoreau Society Annual Gathering

This summer, Paul Schacht and Joe Easterly traveled to the Thoreau Society’s Annual Gathering in Concord, Massachusetts to present  on Digital Thoreau, which is a project that seeks to build a community of scholarship, learning, and discovery centered on the works of Henry David Thoreau, staring with a digital variorum edition of Walden.

Starting in 2010, the Digital Thoreau project has been establishing a network of scholars interested in collaborative scholarship on Thoreau’s manuscripts. Earlier this year, Digital Thoreau joined the DHCommons, which is a centerNet-funded initiative which provides a place for digital humanities projects to find collaborators, and collaborators to find projects. Check out the pitch video!

5th Annual Library Assistants’ Day

5th Annual Library Assistants’ Day

Syracuse, NY

On October 25, 2011, Donna Hanna, Tim Finnigan and I travelled to Syracuse, NY for the 5th Annual Library Assistants’ Day.  This event began in 2007 and was co-sponsored by CLRC and Nylink.  This year’s event was hosted by CLRC, SCRLC, RRLC and WNYLC.

The day began with “Keynote Presentation on Social Media” by Anthony Rotolo, Assistant Professor of Practice and Social Media Strategist at Syracuse University.  Professor Rotolo addressed the group on the fact that social media has been with us for a long time in more of a “gate keeper” format and went on to explain how the current, less restricted Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and YouTube are affecting our lives.  He showed a picture of one of his classes, where everyone had a laptop open, and stated that Twitter is live on the screen during class. He finds he has much more class interaction by using this format.  Professor Rotolo’s presentation was extremely engaging and I found it interesting that he also has a class on Star Trek at Syracuse University!

After a short break, Nora Hardy, South Central Regional Library Council (SCRLC) presented “e-Books and e-Readers Panel Discussion” with input from Caitlyn Lam, Yale University; Heather Urtz, Mid-York Library System; and Charles O’Bryan, Delaware-Chenango-Madison-Otsego BOCES.

Ms. Hardy described what an e-Book and an e-Reader are and how rapidly the technology is changing.  She discussed on content sources, formats, and the devices.  Some of the considerations a library must make are whether to buy or lease a title, can it be lent, how many times and how many simultaneous users can it support.  Ms. Hardy also described some of the options available on an e-reader and suggested sites to research to select the best options for you or your library.

As a Staff Supervisor at the Service Desk in Milne Library, I was especially interested in attending Ben Hogben’s workshop “Supervising Students and Volunteers.”  Mr. Hogben is the Manager of Access Services at Ithaca College.  Not only did he impart a great deal of knowledge but delivered it with a sense of humor that kept us all engrossed and involved.

Mr. Hogben began with the Hiring/Recruiting process including identifying the skills needed, the learning outcomes for the applicant, what career building skills they would acquire in our employment, advertising the position and interviewing techniques to gain the information needed to hire the appropriate applicant.

The second topic covered was Training.  Mr. Hogben quoted a Chinese Proverb, “Tell me, I’ll forget…Show me, I’ll remember…Involve me, I’ll understand.”  He discussed learning styles, being clear on what you want, accessible training guides, methods of communication and evaluating performance.

Mr. Hogben then moved on to Retention and stressed three premises that organizations are built on; communication, respect and trust.  He impressed upon us the importance of personally thanking and congratulating employees who do a good job to re-enforce a positive attitude.  On the reverse, he discussed the need for a Disciplinary/Termination Policy.  There should be documented information that is given to the employee when they are hired so that they know exactly what will not be tolerated in your workplace and how the organization proceeds if one of the policies is violated.  Mr. Hogben states that discipline should always be handled in a non-personal manner.

As a follow-up Mr. Hogben recommended that we become “coaches” for our student employees and suggested reading material.  He also supplied us with other resources for supervising students and volunteers.  Last but not least, he stated the importance of having Emergency Procedures available online AND a hard copy in the department as emergencies don’t just happen on the day shift!

My final event of the day was “Local History:  Folklife in a Public Library” by Todd DeGarmo, Founding Director of the Crandall Public Library Folklife Center, Glens Falls, NY.  The Folklife Center manages the Special Collections and Archives of the library by researching and presenting the cultural traditions of their area.  Mr. DeGarmo described his background and how he began the Center and how he and his staff continue to fund it.  He stated that we are all “folk” and have our stories, our crafts, our beliefs, and our music passed down for generations and occurring now.  He suggested ways of promoting a library’s collections to be an on-going part of life in our own region.

As in the past, this event was an excellent learning experience and we came home with numerous ideas to share with the Milne Library Staff.

Coleen Hopkins

Library Instruction Leadership Academy (LILAC)

The Library Instruction Leadership Academy (LILAC),collaboratively developed by Rochester-area librarians with Milne Library at the forefront, recently held its third workshop, exploring topics such as multiple intelligence and learning styles and “teacher as performer.” Judging from participants’ reactions it was a huge success! Remaining workshops include “teaching with technology,” classroom management and assessment.

LILAC is a semester-long intensive learning experience geared towards librarians new to instruction that includes a variety of workshops, field observations, assigned readings, reflection, discussions, and a final instruction project. Each workshop focuses on an aspect of library instruction and involves a mixture of pedagogical theory, best practices and hands on experience.

Participants will reflect upon what they have learned throughout the semester and then “teach it forward” by completing a final project. These projects range from starting an information literacy program for homed schooled children to presenting workshops at an upcoming library conference. The Academy runs until May 2010 and culminates with a graduation party where participants will showcase their final projects.

Click on the image thumbnail for a larger view.

Learning about Mobile Library Services

Several Milne Librarians interested in using mobile technology for the Library took part in this year’s Handheld Librarian II Online Conference February 17th and 18th.

Topics ranged from trends and “social reference” (and how libraries fit into it) to “iPhone/Mobile Applications for Digital Library” to building a mobile site to mobile tagging, including QR codes and were included in topic tracks for Mobile Reference Service, E-readers, Mobile Apps, Marketing, Websites, and Content for Library Mobile Sites.

You can see what some other schools and organizations are doing with their mobile sites, including Duke University, Northwestern University, International Children’s Digital Library (ICDL), and London’s National Gallery.

Currently Milne offers very basic access through our Milne Library Mobile page. Have you used the mobile page? What was your experience like? If Milne were to offer extended mobile services, would you use them? If so, what would be the kinds of information and services you’d like to have access to through your cell phone? Tell us in the comments!

The 2007 IDS Conference

Over 80 participants are in Milne Library today for the first day of the annual IDS Conference. The IDS Conference is a gathering of ILL librarians, staff and administrators of over 20 different libraries in New York State, who meet yearly to discuss the IDS Project, an information delivery services project designed to create more effective ways to share library resources. Each of the libraries in the project agrees to a set of performance standards, such as borrowing or loaning journal articles with certain turnaround times, in order work together cooperatively towards a common goal. For more details about the conference or The IDS Project, please contact the Project Director, Ed Rivenburgh, at [email protected].

Library staff members attend the ACRL conference

Keynote addresses from Michael Eric Dyson and John Waters highlighted the Association of College and Research Libraries national conference in Baltimore, MD this past week.

Director Ed Rivenburgh, librarians Tracy Paradis, Paul MacLean and Rich Dreifuss, and instructional support associate Bonnie Swoger recently returned from 3 days of presentations, posters, vendors and exhibits.

Another highlight was dinner with fellow librarians from public liberal arts colleges (COPLAC members). After a beautiful walk through historic Baltimore, we settled in with some micro-brews at the Brewer’s Art Restaurant to discuss library instruction, staff responsibilities, administrative support and Baltimore history with our counterparts from institutions similar to Geneseo.

Highlights of the presentations included gaming in library instruction, the future of reference, applications of social networking and a wide variety of technology applications. Library staff returned to work on Monday filled with future plans and ready to share what they learned.