Pilot: What is VoiceThread? We Need Your Help!

VThreadAre you looking for new ways to engage students? SUNY Geneseo is piloting a trial of VoiceThread and needs your feedback.

VoiceThread is an interactive collaborative learning tool that can be used to enhance student engagement outside of the classroom or in online environments. With VoiceThread, instructors and/or students can create, share, and comment on images, PowerPoint presentations, videos, audio files, documents, and PDFs using microphone, webcam, text, phone, and audio-file upload. At SUNY Geneseo, VoiceThread is an external tool that integrates into myCourses.

VoiceThread can be used in many different ways to enhance classroom learning experiences. Use it for flipping instruction, discussions outside of class, critiquing work, remediation, or practicing language skills.

A couple of examples to consider (more below):

Accessing VoiceThread

You may access VoiceThread in two ways: in myCourses and through Geneseo’s VoiceThread Website.

myCourses access:  Adding VoiceThread to your course

  • Navigate to your course.
  • Click “Add Content”.
  • Select “External Tool”.
  • Give the activity a title.
  • For tool provider, select “VoiceThread”.
  • Check the box that says “Enable grading”.
  • Save changes.

For more information on how to create your first thread visit – https://voicethread.com/howto/angel/

 

Geneseo VoiceThread Website:

Faculty and students are also able to create a Voicethread without using Angel, visit https://geneseo.voicethread.com and register with a geneseo.edu email account.

 

VoiceThread Support Team:

If you would like to learn more about VoiceThread or want assistance setting it up for your course, contact:

Brandon West: [email protected]

Michelle Costello: [email protected]

 

Additional Links

Learn more about VoiceThread’s Features:

Additional Examples of VoiceThread in the Higher Ed Classroom:

 

Writing in College: From Competence to Excellence [an Open SUNY Textbook]

Untitled-3
Writing in College: From Competence to Excellence By Amy Guptill, with contributions by Aly Button, Peter Farrell, Kaethe Leonard, and Timothée Pizarro.

Please join me in congratulating Amy Guptill on her publication of Writing in College: From Competence to Excellence, the newest Open SUNY Textbook!

Many high school students have mastered writing conventions but still struggle to understand and meet the expectations at the college level. Other students, perhaps out of school for a number of years, are getting reacquainted with academic writing while working to meet college-level challenges. Writing in College demystifies college-level expectations, helping students see the purpose behind the varied writing assignments they face.

Guptill skillfully positions specific and applicable advice about college writing within the larger framework of transitioning to the culture of the academy and college-level expectations. In addition, chapters can be read independently and assigned separately, and each is accompanied by further resources, suggested exercises, and advice from other student writers.

Writing in College: From Competence to Excellence

 Available as ebook and PDF downloads, as well as online, at: textbooks.opensuny.org/writing-in-college-from-competence-to-excellence/

 

About the Textbook

Writing in College: From Competence to Excellence is designed for students who have largely mastered the conventions of high-school level writing and are now rising to meet more the advanced expectations of college. Students will find in Writing in College a warm invitation to think of themselves as full, self-motivated members of the academic community. With concise explanations, clear multi-disciplinary examples and empathy for the challenges of student life, this short textbook both explains the purposes behind college-level writing and offers indispensable advice for organization and expression.

 

About the Author

Amy Guptill is an Associate Professor of Sociology at The College at Brockport, SUNY where she has a joint appointment with the Delta College Program, an alternative interdisciplinary General Education option. Her research focuses on spatial and structural shifts in agriculture and food systems with recent work on innovative agricultural marketing. She teaches courses in the sociology of food, development and globalization, community and social change, social statistics and college writing. In addition to Writing In College: From Competence to Excellence, she is the coauthor of a recent college textbook entitled Food & Society: Principles and Paradoxes (Malden, MA: Polity, 2012).

 

Value of Open Access Textbooks

The author is thrilled to offer this book as an open textbook. The cost of commercial textbooks is an urgent and growing problem, and all students should have easy access to advice about how to get the most out of the hundreds of pages of writing they’ll do over the course of a four-year degree.

Licensed for reuse and remix, the Open SUNY Textbooks are a valuable addition to the open access textbook community. Freely available, the open access content is peer reviewed by fellow instructors and scholars for quality and then copy-edited before publication. Open textbooks are just one component of the open educational resources movement (OER) and provide high quality, reusable material for course instructors to create cost savings for students and institutions.

 

About Open SUNY Textbooks

The SUNY Textbook program is a creative means to improving access to educational materials while fostering a community of resources that spans disciplines and encourages interdisciplinary study. SUNY Libraries and faculty are leading SUNY’s open textbook publishing initiative and have already saved thousands of dollars for SUNY students. Having published 12 free online textbooks, with 14 more planned in the next 18 months, this innovative multi-institutional program is lowering the cost of textbooks for students in New York and beyond.

Open textbooks are available to everyone free of charge. Over 50,000 downloads of Open SUNY Textbooks occurred between February 1, 2015-December 14, 2015, with visitors and readers from all over the world. For program details, please visit http://textbooks.opensuny.org

Check it out: Hamlet curriculum guide

HamletThe Scout Report recommends this useful resource:

This Hamlet curriculum guide, assembled by the Folger Shakespeare Library, provides a substantial array of teacher resources. Here educators will find a synopsis of the play, an overview of the characters in graphic form, tips for teaching Shakespeare, a series of helpful frequently asked questions about teaching the Bard, two full Lesson Plans with handouts, and a page of short quotes from the play. The lesson plans, especially, provide a creative take on the classic text. One investigates Hamlet’s central dilemmas (the death of his father, the remarriage of his mother, and his inability to act). The second uses music to explore Shakespeare’s characters. [CNH]

Lesson Plans: Resources to Engage Students and Enhance Learning

MichellePostIt can be difficult to find the right website to use in lesson planning, specifically one that contains videos, activities, games or other engaging material. I am highlighting three that stand out: two because of their high-quality content & their alignment w/the Common Core (BrainPop & PBS LearningMedia), & one that specializes in hard-to-find educational videos (Kanopy Streaming Video).

These media resources are helpful to use while creating lesson plans for your classes and for use with students in the classroom. In addition to containing subject and topic specific videos, they are also rich in lesson planning and activity ideas, many aligned to the common core.

BrainPOP creates animated, curriculum-based content. Resources include: movies, quizzes, games, mobile apps, experiments, activity pages, and much more covering hundreds of topics within Math, Science, Social Studies, English, Technology, Arts & Music, and Health. All content is aligned to and searchable by state standards including Common Core.

PBS LearningMedia provides access to thousands of classroom-ready, curriculum-targeted digital resources. Resources are aligned to Common Core and national standards and include videos and interactives, as well as audio, documents, and in-depth lesson plans. You can browse by standards, grade level, subject area, and special collections.  You must be a SOE faculty member or student to access this resource. Please contact me if you have issues accessing the site.

Kanopy Streaming Video is an on-demand streaming video service for educational institutions that provides access to more than 26,000 films. Over 80 subject areas range from Global Studies & Languages to the Arts, to Education (K-12); Technical Training to Career Development to LGBT.

For more media resource ideas, visit the Education Lesson Planning guide, or contact the Education Librarian, Michelle Costello, directly at [email protected]

Kanopy Streaming Video

KanopyHere’s a new resource to get excited about!

Milne library has recently acquired Kanopy; an on-demand streaming video service for educational institutions that provides access to more than 26,000 films. Over 80 subject areas range from Global Studies & Languages to the Arts, to Education (K-12); Technical Training to Career Development to LGBT.

Kanopy works directly with filmmakers and film distribution companies to offer award-winning collections including titles from PBS, BBC, Criterion Collection, Media Education Foundation and more.

KanGuide

The site is pretty intuitive, but we’ve put together a guide that explains not only how to use the resource, but also how faculty might embed materials into myCourses for their classes, as well as pointing out features like transcripts and playlists.

Take it for a spin and let us know what your experience is. Is this something you’ll use? We want to know!

Looking for a Quick Read?

50Short copyYep. We’re all short on time these days, but don’t let that be the reason you’re not reading!

For years, recreational reading has been declining, but according to Pew, this trend is slowly reversing. There are many, many reasons to prioritize reading in your life, and not least is that, according to research done by the National Endowment for the Arts, those who read for pleasure “are more likely to vote, participate in volunteer work, play sports, attend sporting events, engage in outdoor activities, attend cultural events, visit museums, attain higher levels of education, and work in more financially rewarding jobs.  Pleasure readers are active agents in their worlds.

Sure, you’ve started the school year and have a reading list a mile long, but… when you have a bit of time, take a moment and check out one of these SHORT (and often, seminal!) books compiled by our friends at Ebook Friendly

Do you have a favorite short book? Share it in the comments!

Textbooks and Reserves @Milne

Milne library has a growing collection of required course texts for many of the courses taught on campus. These are generally available for 4 hour loan at the Service Desk. You can search GLOCAT+ (or GLOCAT Classic) to see if we have your textbooks. Search by textbook title or author. If you are having trouble, just stop by the Service Desk and we’ll let you know if we have your textbook.

For additional information, check out our Find Textbooks and Course Reserves Guide.

If Milne doesn’t have the text or course reading that you need on reserve at the Service Desk, you may be able to borrow it from another library (note that popular, current editions of textbooks are often unavailable through IDS). Search for it in IDS Search to see if we can borrow it for you from another library. If you’re uncertain of the exact name of the textbook, a quick search of http://books.geneseo.edu can resolve the issue.

We also have 9 titles available on a Kindle Fire!  The Kindles can be checked out for 4 hours and include the following textbooks:

Molecular Biology of the Cell (Alberts, 6th)
Multivariable Calculus (Stewart, 7th ed.)
Multivariable Calculus (Stewart, 7th ed.)
Organic Chemistry (Solomons, 11th ed.)
Organic Chemistry (Solomons, 11th ed.)
Organic Chemistry (McMurry, 8th ed.)
Organic Chemistry (McMurry, 8th ed.)
Abnormal Psychology (Barlow, 7th)
Abnormal Psychology (Barlow, 7th)






Cambell biology
Campbell Biology (Reece, 10th)
Essential Cell Biology (Alberts, 4th)
Essential Cell Biology (Alberts, 4th)
Physics (Cutnell, 9th)
Physics (Cutnell, 9th)
Financial Accounting (Harrison, Horngren and Thomas, 7th)
Financial Accounting (Harrison, Horngren and Thomas, 7th)

Government Documents Are Moving Back to Milne

GDocsCollectionThis summer, the library is moving our government documents back to Milne in preparation for building renovations in Fraser. The loss of the space in Fraser gave us opportunity to work with faculty across several disciplines in a re-evaluation of this collection. “We know that there just isn’t enough space to bring everything back to Milne. However, most of the material in this collection is available online. In fact, over 95% of materials currently published by the Government Printing Office are freely available in full-text online,” said Justina Elmore, Coordinator of the Government Documents Collection. “We spent last semester working with faculty to determine what and how much of this collection we could, and have room to, retain.”

Now that the size of the collection has been reduced to just the government documents that our patrons actually use, the library has begun the process of moving them back to Milne. Additionally, Milne Library will continue to offer quick delivery via IDS for any deselected items that are not yet online, should the need arise. Luckily, there are two Federal Depository libraries in the area from which to draw.

Bringing these materials back to Milne will make finding and using government documents easier. Most of the material will become part of the general collection, allowing us to reduce the number of places a researcher must look in order to find materials on a particular topic.

Wave Machines, Puppets, and a Scavenger Hunt: The Perfect Field Trip!

On Friday, March 27, SUNY Geneseo was host to four 3rd graders and their teachers from the Genesee Valley BOCES program. The purpose of the visit was to introduce the students (all on the Autism Spectrum) to the idea of attending college and for them to experience the life of a college student (at least for one day). Each of the visiting students was paired up with a Geneseo School of Education student, who served  as their “buddy” for the day. The following is a write-up from one of the buddys.
miranda2“…I was able to spend the morning and afternoon with four great students from the BOCES program. My buddy for the day was a third grader named Makayla. We spent the morning looking at the wave machine in the Science building at Geneseo and seeing the cool things that happened when waves caused erosion on a shoreline! At lunch Makayla and I sat together with another student, Landon, and his college-buddy. They were telling us all about themselves including their pets and siblings and even what they have learned in school this year (they were especially excited to tell us about their fraction knowledge).  Makayla was full of questions about college and was really interested with the fact that we lived here as well as went to school! We next got to have some fun running around campus during our scavenge hunt. Makayla was especially excited about finding a colorful piano in the College Union, and even started to play some notes! When we finally arrived at our last location, the library, there were prizes waiting for the students. Makayla was really excited about her prizes and showed them off all around! It was a great time to read with her and see her interest in all the different books and puppets she could look at and use in the library. Overall it was a great day filled with lots of fun and excitement!”

patrick2lauren2andy2

This was an amazing experience, not only for the 3rd graders but for the Geneseo students (and staff) as well! We hope that this is just the first in many such opportunities.

The Imaginarium: A creative Space for SOE Students

The Imaginarium is an open space located in Milne Library on the Lower Level. It is place where School of Education students have access to a wide variety of materials and resources that help them to create dynamic lessons, displays, bulletin boards, models and many more projects.

imaginarium-collageThe Imaginarium helps students connect manipulatives and other additive resources such as, games, textbooks, and videos to their lessons and assignments to create more exciting and lively projects and presentations.

The Imaginarium is also available to clubs, organizations, and the community to use along side the wide variety of materials in the TERC collection, including lots of fiction and non-fiction children books, games, and puppets.

Office hours are on Monday and Wednesday from 7pm-9pm. Please feel free to stop by with questions or help you need with upcoming projects! In addition send an email directly to the Imaginarium curator, Miranda ([email protected]) or Education Librarian, Michelle Costello ([email protected]).