Local Resources: Gay Alliance of Genesee Valley

GAGV
Photo of the GAGV’s LGBTQ Resource Center’s new library.

If you are new to Western New York, you might not be privy to the city’s extensive history in the LGBTQ movement that formed what is known today as the Gay Alliance of Genesee Valley (GAGV). The GAGV has been monumental in making Rochester a safer place to live for those who do not fall into a binary with regard to sexuality or gender expression.

You may have witnessed the impact of the GAGV right here on-campus: the rainbow signs hanging by many faculty and staff’s offices indicate they have received SafeZone Training. This training serves as an educational tool to educate supportive faculty, staff, and students on LGBTQ terminology, issues, and questions.

Recently, the GAGV has opened the doors of its new LGBTQ Resource Center at 100 College Avenue in Rochester. This resource center serves an educational and safe space for LGBTQ individuals as well as their allies. The center features a library, archives, and hosts weekly social events.

  • The library contains over 10,000 fiction and nonfiction books, periodicals, and DVDs, which are all available for you to borrow. You can browse the center’s collection online via LibraryThing.
  • The archives have plenty of historical material that help document the progression of the LGBTQ movement in Rochester, including The Empty Closet, the original publication used to advance the rights of so many individuals in Western New York.
  • The resource centers hours are:
    Monday-Friday 9:00am-5:00 pm &
    Wednesdays, 6:00-8:00 pm.
    Everyone is welcome!
GAGVStaff
The volunteer staff of the GAGV Library & Archives.

If you cannot make it all the way up to Rochester, no worries! Milne Library and SUNY Geneseo have many available LGBTQ resources. You can find many books on LGBTQ topics in Milne’s collection as well as specialized LGBTQ research databases.  Aiden Cropsey, Coordinator of LGBTQ Programs and Services, along with the student-led Pride Alliance, host several events throughout the year, and even have their own floating book collection. You can also like and follow them on Facebook!

All photos and images used with permission from the Gay Alliance of Genesee Valley.

~ written by Brandon West

Kanopy Streaming Video

KanopyHere’s a new resource to get excited about!

Milne library has recently acquired Kanopy; an on-demand streaming video service for educational institutions that provides access to more than 26,000 films. Over 80 subject areas range from Global Studies & Languages to the Arts, to Education (K-12); Technical Training to Career Development to LGBT.

Kanopy works directly with filmmakers and film distribution companies to offer award-winning collections including titles from PBS, BBC, Criterion Collection, Media Education Foundation and more.

KanGuide

The site is pretty intuitive, but we’ve put together a guide that explains not only how to use the resource, but also how faculty might embed materials into myCourses for their classes, as well as pointing out features like transcripts and playlists.

Take it for a spin and let us know what your experience is. Is this something you’ll use? We want to know!

“How Do I …” save time and frustration with research projects!

HowDoISo you’re new to campus and kinda new to the whole research paper thing.  Or you’re not new but just a bit rusty, and that library skills class you took seems so long ago.  Who can remember all that searching/citing/writing stuff anyway?

Just settle down, breathe deeply, turn on your computer, and bring up Milne Library’s homepage.  See that list over there on the right, called Quick Links?  About half way down is the one you want – “How do I …

HowDoI sm

 

 

 

Click on it and you’ll find all you need to help you through your research project, no matter which stage it’s at. Just about everything is covered, from “Begin My Research” to “Edit and Proofread My Writing.”   Need help distinguishing scholarly from popular (or primary from secondary) sources?  There’s a guide for that! Need some guidance on which databases to use, and how to do a really great search? Yep – there’s a guide for that, too.

When asking a librarian is just not an option – whether because it’s 2 a.m. and you need help NOW, or because you’re more of a DIYer – Milne’s “How do I …” guides will help see you through the research, citing, and writing of your paper or project.  (But do try to ask a librarian, too, OK?)Start

Data: What Do YOU Need in our Collection?

ScipioneCensusLecture
Paul Scipione talks about his mentor and friend Dr. George Gallup, well know for developing the Gallup opinion poll.

The library held a successful Celebration of Data event last Wednesday (April 24, 2013) where Professor Emeritus Paul Scipione gave a lecture on the value of census data.

“Looking at census information, you are able to see not just statistics, but that there are stories in there…”.  The data provides “the very story of the United States,” giving us a historical picture of when Americans became affluent enough to afford a family car, televisions, college degrees or their own homes.  Scipione tells us how businesses saw the value of census information for market research and how technological advances impacted what and how much information could be collected and offered by the Census Bureau.  For more, watch the lecture online.

The event was part of the 2013 International Year of Statistics, an initiative of over 1900 participating organizations from all over the world who are holding events to celebrate data and promote the importance of statistics.

But we don’t want the conversations to end there!

DataQuestionMark1
Tell us, what are your data needs?

It is most fitting that during this year of statistics, Milne is developing a census and data collection for Geneseo.  The purpose of the collection is to provide student, staff and faculty researchers easy access to data; and to provide area entrepreneurs and small businesses access to economic and demographic data for market research.

This collection will be most useful if folks like you have a hand in its development.  Let us know what resources you need in this collection.

Mobile Library Resources

MobileResearchAccording to research done by the Pew Research Center, 66% of Americans age 18-29 own a smartphone. For those of you with smartphones, tablets or other mobile devices, there are many library resources that are available for you to explore on the go.

You can start with the library’s mobile website, which gives you access to library hours and phone numbers for the service desk and library staff. Then there are a wide variety of mobile websites to help with quick look ups, or to get you started on your research. Milne Library’s Guide to Mobile Resources can help you find resources formatted for your mobile device, and all of our subject guides are easily viewable on your smartphone (although the resources they point to may not be as accessible).

MobileGuideThese mobile websites will help you find books or articles in Milne Library (either online or in print):

  • Library Home Page (mobile) – Library hours, staff contact information, and links to common resources formatted for your mobile device
  • GLOCAT+ (mobile) – Find books and articles available to Milne Library patrons.
  • GLOCAT Classic (Mobile) – Find books, DVDs, CDs and other items from Milne’s collection. Great for quickly looking up call numbers.
  • Worldcat (mobile) – Find books in libraries worldwide. Enter a zip code to find an item in a local library

    A few useful apps for research.
    A few useful apps for research.

Many of our databases also have mobile websites.  If you have accounts for these databases, you can access your saved articles, citations and lists.

Other vendors create separate mobile apps that you can download and use on your phones or tablets.

ArtStorMobile
ArtStor Mobile app image search
              • EBSCOhost for iOS – Provides access to Milne’s EBSCOhost subscriptions in a dedicated app for your iPhone, iPod Touch, or iPad. Includes the ability to save PDFs to outside apps, such as Google Drive, Dropbox or iBooks.
              • iSSRN – Provided by the Social Science Research Network, iSSRN provides access on your iPhone or iPad to a huge amount of freely-available literature in the social sciences and humanities.
              • NML for iOS – Naxos Music Library for iOS
              • ARTstor Mobile
              • ACS Mobile – Free. Access recently published and resources from the American Chemical Society.
              • arXiv  – Free. Full text access to the pre-prints available at the arXiv.org website in Physics, Mathematics, Nonlinear Sciences, Computer Science, Quantitative Biology, Quantitative Finance, and Statistics.
      • SciVerse ScienceDirect Premium  – $2.99 per year. Full text access to the articles available on ScienceDirect, from the publisher Elsevier. iPad only.
      • SciVerse Scopus Alerts (Institutional)  – Free. Search science and social science literature, get citation alerts and create lists of articles. Users are required to sign up for an account at the Scopus website in order to authenticate.
      • World Bank DataFinder  – Free. Access World Bank Data from your phone.
      • US Census Browser  – iPad only. Browse data from the US 2010 Census.

Then you’ll want to get your hands on the apps that can help you get your work done.  There are apps to work with citation management tools like Zotero and Mendeley, and apps to help you access documents stored in Google Drive.  The EasyBib app allows you to scan the barcode of a book to automatically create a citation you can email to yourself.

While doing your research on your phone probably won’t replace hard-care searching on your computer, it is often convenient to have mobile tools to help with quick look ups or searches.

What apps or mobile resources do you use to do research?

Go loco for local history!

Here’s a resource you probably didn’t know about, but really should — even if you’re just curious about Geneseo and its regional environs: the Local History Subject Guide.  It will lead you to all kinds of cool sources dealing with many aspects of the Genesee Valley region, including Livingston, Monroe, Wyoming, Genesee, Ontario, Orleans, Steuben and Allegany counties.

Geneseo Main St., looking toward Park St.
Geneseo Main St., looking toward Park St.

The Guide is a must-see first stop for students seeking a local take on their research topics, from American history to demographics, Native American studies, geology, business, education — you name it.  Milne Library’s own Genesee Valley Historical Collection, located on the lower level, is home to a wide variety of local historical materials, but the Guide also points to other collections, both online and physical, that are worth knowing about.  This is especially important since so much of the local history record is unique — i.e., original source materials held by single agencies.  Increased digitization of unique materials, however, is removing barriers to access, and libraries, historical societies, and museums are able to more easily share their treasures with everyone.  A great example, and one in which Milne Library has added some of its unique collections, is the New York Heritage digital repository.

So whether you’re a student on a research mission, a local history buff, genealogist, author, or simply someone a little interested in the area you’re calling home these days, check out Milne’s Local History guide and see where it leads you.

Textbooks and Reserves at Milne

Milne library has a growing collection of required course texts for many of the courses taught on campus. Most are available for 4 hour loan at the Service Desk.

For an in-depth explanation of all that is available, check out our Find Textbooks and Course Reserves Guide.  With many options of how to access required materials for students’ different courses, the process may be confusing. This guide will help students find material for their coursework.

If Milne doesn’t have the text or course reading that you need on reserve at the Service Desk, you may be able to find it in the general collection.  Here are a few ways to find out:

  1. Search for the title in GLOCAT+ to see if we have it in the library’s general collection.
  2. Search for the title of your textbook on our How Do I Find My Course Texts library guide to see if we have it on 4 hour reserve at the Service Desk.
  3. Search for it in IDS Search to see if we can borrow it for you from another library.

 

Finding Biology Data

Looking for biology data?

Projects, labs, and papers can all sometimes benefit from the use and analysis of data.  Professors may even require that you incorporate some original analysis of data in your projects.

If you are searching for biology data, I generally recommend two primary strategies:

First, you can start with a journal article.  Most primary research articles contain charts or tables of data that you can use.  And many articles now come with supplementary data – additional charts, graphs and data tables in a separate file that contribute to the article.  This is a great strategy if you are looking for data on a particular topic. Start with a search in Scopus or PubMed (from the biology subject guide) using keywords appropriate to your topic.

Second, you can start with the data.  There are biology data repositories across all fields – genetics, ecology, molecular biology, etc.  Where you look depends on what kind of data you need.  The biology subject guide details dozens of data repositories across all fields and can be a useful starting place. This is a useful strategy for those times when your professor says, “Find some data, any data.” Alternatively, you may already know that you need gene sequence data (or another specific kind of data) and there may be a data repository just for that.

Correlation doesn't imply causation, but it does waggle its eyebrows suggestively and gesture furtively while mouthing 'look over there'.
Courtesy xkcd.com, CC BY-NC 2.0

Of course, if you have trouble finding the data you need, you can talk with a reference librarian to help you search.  Stop by the service desk, send us an IM (from any library webpage) or request an appointment online.

Once you find the data, you’ll need to bring it into your favorite data analysis tool.  Stop by the library service desk to chat with one of our Tech Help students, or set up a technology consultation with our technology instructor, Steve Dresbach to help you do this.

Resource Spotlight: GIS Subject Guide

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Geotechnology
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Geotechnology

Milne Library, in collaboration with the Geography department, has created a research guide for Geographic Information Systems and Geotechnology.  This fast-growing, practical, and influential field of study is both evolving and diversifying.  It is used heavily in many fields to visualize data, including (but certainly not limited to) medicine, law enforcement and business.  GIS incorporates visual-spatial data, and  data in a way that allows the user to view and even manipulate information, ultimately providing those users with more context and a clearer understanding of that data.

Whether you’re looking for examples of resources that incorporate GIS, looking to learn more about this ever-growing field, or even looking to create your own data-infused-maps, this guide can get you started!

Want to add some pizazz to your next class presentation or project?

Social media creation software is making it so much easier to create professional looking content.  If you are looking to spruce up your projects and presentations, it could be as easy as  replacing your tired old bullet points with a colorful concept map, word cloud, or photo collage.

Check out our Social Media library guide to see tools that will help you make these, as well as other media creation software that librarians use and recommend!