Your Textbooks, Here @Milne?

textbookspic1Milne library has a growing collection of required course texts for many of the courses taught on campus. These are generally available for 4 hour loan at the Service Desk. You can search GLOCAT+ (or GLOCAT Classic) to see if we have your textbooks. Search by textbook title or author. If you are having trouble, just stop by the Service Desk and we’ll let you know if we have your textbook.

For additional information, check out our Find Textbooks and Course Reserves Guide.

TextbooksGuide

If Milne doesn’t have the text or course reading that you need on reserve at the Service Desk, you may be able to borrow it from another library (note that popular, current editions of textbooks are often unavailable through IDS). Search for it in IDS Search to see if we can borrow it for you from another library. If you’re uncertain of the exact name of the textbook, a quick search of http://books.geneseo.edu can resolve the issue.

Local Resources: Gay Alliance of Genesee Valley

GAGV

Photo of the GAGV’s LGBTQ Resource Center’s new library.

If you are new to Western New York, you might not be privy to the city’s extensive history in the LGBTQ movement that formed what is known today as the Gay Alliance of Genesee Valley (GAGV). The GAGV has been monumental in making Rochester a safer place to live for those who do not fall into a binary with regard to sexuality or gender expression.

You may have witnessed the impact of the GAGV right here on-campus: the rainbow signs hanging by many faculty and staff’s offices indicate they have received SafeZone Training. This training serves as an educational tool to educate supportive faculty, staff, and students on LGBTQ terminology, issues, and questions.

Recently, the GAGV has opened the doors of its new LGBTQ Resource Center at 100 College Avenue in Rochester. This resource center serves an educational and safe space for LGBTQ individuals as well as their allies. The center features a library, archives, and hosts weekly social events.

  • The library contains over 10,000 fiction and nonfiction books, periodicals, and DVDs, which are all available for you to borrow. You can browse the center’s collection online via LibraryThing.
  • The archives have plenty of historical material that help document the progression of the LGBTQ movement in Rochester, including The Empty Closet, the original publication used to advance the rights of so many individuals in Western New York.
  • The resource centers hours are:
    Monday-Friday 9:00am-5:00 pm &
    Wednesdays, 6:00-8:00 pm.
    Everyone is welcome!
GAGVStaff

The volunteer staff of the GAGV Library & Archives.

If you cannot make it all the way up to Rochester, no worries! Milne Library and SUNY Geneseo have many available LGBTQ resources. You can find many books on LGBTQ topics in Milne’s collection as well as specialized LGBTQ research databases.  Aiden Cropsey, Coordinator of LGBTQ Programs and Services, along with the student-led Pride Alliance, host several events throughout the year, and even have their own floating book collection. You can also like and follow them on Facebook!

All photos and images used with permission from the Gay Alliance of Genesee Valley.

~ written by Brandon West

Get Yer Board Books Here!

BoardBooksIf you’re looking for the board books to use for lesson planning, be aware that they’ve got a new home in the Teacher’s Education Resource Center. Just take a look at the bright, colorful new shelving unit that just made its way into the center of the collection and have a browse…

Do you like it? Maybe you have some suggestions? Let us know!

Looking for a Quick Read?

50Short copyYep. We’re all short on time these days, but don’t let that be the reason you’re not reading!

For years, recreational reading has been declining, but according to Pew, this trend is slowly reversing. There are many, many reasons to prioritize reading in your life, and not least is that, according to research done by the National Endowment for the Arts, those who read for pleasure “are more likely to vote, participate in volunteer work, play sports, attend sporting events, engage in outdoor activities, attend cultural events, visit museums, attain higher levels of education, and work in more financially rewarding jobs.  Pleasure readers are active agents in their worlds.

Sure, you’ve started the school year and have a reading list a mile long, but… when you have a bit of time, take a moment and check out one of these SHORT (and often, seminal!) books compiled by our friends at Ebook Friendly

Do you have a favorite short book? Share it in the comments!

Textbooks and Reserves @Milne

Milne library has a growing collection of required course texts for many of the courses taught on campus. These are generally available for 4 hour loan at the Service Desk. You can search GLOCAT+ (or GLOCAT Classic) to see if we have your textbooks. Search by textbook title or author. If you are having trouble, just stop by the Service Desk and we’ll let you know if we have your textbook.

For additional information, check out our Find Textbooks and Course Reserves Guide.

If Milne doesn’t have the text or course reading that you need on reserve at the Service Desk, you may be able to borrow it from another library (note that popular, current editions of textbooks are often unavailable through IDS). Search for it in IDS Search to see if we can borrow it for you from another library. If you’re uncertain of the exact name of the textbook, a quick search of http://books.geneseo.edu can resolve the issue.

We also have 9 titles available on a Kindle Fire!  The Kindles can be checked out for 4 hours and include the following textbooks:

Molecular Biology of the Cell (Alberts, 6th)

Multivariable Calculus (Stewart, 7th ed.)

Multivariable Calculus (Stewart, 7th ed.)

Organic Chemistry (Solomons, 11th ed.)

Organic Chemistry (Solomons, 11th ed.)

Organic Chemistry (McMurry, 8th ed.)

Organic Chemistry (McMurry, 8th ed.)

Abnormal Psychology (Barlow, 7th)

Abnormal Psychology (Barlow, 7th)






Cambell biology

Campbell Biology (Reece, 10th)

Essential Cell Biology (Alberts, 4th)

Essential Cell Biology (Alberts, 4th)

Physics (Cutnell, 9th)

Physics (Cutnell, 9th)

Financial Accounting (Harrison, Horngren and Thomas, 7th)

Financial Accounting (Harrison, Horngren and Thomas, 7th)

Open SUNY Textbooks: New Release!

OST.Instruction in Functional Assessment

Open SUNY Textbooks: New Release! Instruction in Functional Assessment by Marcie Desrochers and Moira Fallon

Instruction in Functional Assessment by Marcie Desrochers and Moira Fallon is the latest publication of Open SUNY Textbooks. Open textbooks help reduce the cost of textbooks and higher education, and Open SUNY Textbooks is an innovative program led by SUNY Libraries and Faculty.

Instruction in Functional Assessment provides students and instructors a foundational understanding of functional assessment procedures. This text includes case studies, role-plays, and assignments to support hands-on application of the material, and resources for instructors in evaluating students’ performance. Available open & free on opensuny.org as an interactive PDF and EPUB ebook.

Dr. Marcie Desrochers

Dr. Marcie Desrochers is an Associate Professor of Psychology

Dr. Marcie Desrochers is an Associate Professor of Psychology at The College at Brockport, State University of New York. Desrochers has conducted research on teaching functional assessment and evaluating the effectiveness of a computer simulation program called Simulations in Developmental Disabilities. She also has extensive experience teaching undergraduate and graduate students, and supervising students and practitioners in the field.

Dr. Moira Fallon

Dr. Moira Fallon is a Professor in the Department of Education and Human Development

Dr. Moira Fallon is a Professor in the Department of Education and Human Development at The College at Brockport, State University of New York and has over thirty years of experience in the field of special education in public schools. She holds certifications from several states in learning disabilities, behavior disabilities, early intervention, and assistive technology. Dr. Fallon has published widely in issues of inclusion and advocacy for individuals with disabilities, and has been a leader in developing learning communities, promoting school leaders for continuous improvement, and identifying research-based, supportive resources for improving professional skills.

Milne Library is proud to support this new Open Textbook! Be sure to check out the list of forthcoming titles scheduled for publication in 2015. Students, ask your professor if they will consider adopting an open textbook!

Many other organizations are also developing open textbooks. If your subject area is not covered in the Open SUNY Textbooks catalog, check out:

 

 

 

What are we reading? Staff recommended reads for November

NovSliderAre you looking for a good book to read?  Hundreds of thousands of books are published each year, so how does one choose? Read on for several Milne Library staff  book recommendations for the month of November.

Business & Data Librarian Justina Elmore recommends a popular novel by Dan Brown:

Inferno-coverI’ve just finished reading Dan Brown’s latest book Inferno.  Brown is best known for his novel The Da Vinci Code (2003) and his works are guilty-pleasure reading for me. It isn’t high literature, but he’s a great storyteller and you can tell he’s spent a good deal of time in a library. In this latest novel, symbolist Robert Langdon unwittingly finds himself at the center of controversy (again) and in a globe-trotting race to save the world from a bio-terrorist attack.  A task that can only be accomplished by decoding Dante’s Inferno. Dante scholars should probably avoid the agony of reading this one, but it’s a quick and entertaining read for the rest of us willing to suspend reality for a few hours.

Librarian Kate Pitcher recommends a new fantasy novel, The Bone Season, by British writer Samantha Shannon:

bone seasonThe Bone Season is the first of a projected seven book series and is generating  a lot of buzz. Paige Mahoney is a “dreamwalker”, a type of clairvoyant in London, circa 2059.  Paige’s special abilities allow her to walk in and out of others’ minds and take information without their knowledge. Paige works for  a crime syndicate in the shadowy underbelly of London, but her life is dramatically changed overnight when she is kidnapped and taken to the lost city of Oxford.  Paige is kept imprisoned by a race of beings from another world, called the Rephaim, and is assigned a keeper, called Warden.  In order to find her escape, she realizes she must get close to Warden; an uneasy and altogether dangerous subterfuge. Gripping and entertaining, The Bone Season, marks an impressive debut  in what will be an original and thrilling series of science fiction.

For fans of contemporary fiction, Business Manager Ryann Fair recommends two titles this month:

light oceansI’m currently reading The Light Between Oceans by M. L. Stedman. If you’re looking for a gripping, emotional, and morally challenging read then I would give this first time novelist a try!

Winter Garden by Kristin Hannah is hands down one of my all-time favorites! This novel is beautifully written and will draw you in. It’ll take you on one heck of an emotional roller coaster; making you laugh and (if your like me) cry as you discover the chilling and courageous story of Anya Whitman and her family.

What is the impact of textbook prices on students?

written by Tim Bowersox and Kate Pitcher

It is a commonly heard story on campus that students are feeling the pressure when it comes to textbook prices.  Anecdotally, librarians and faculty have heard about many students’ dropping or avoiding classes because they cannot afford the required texts — not because of content, interest or availability. Next week, Milne Library will be holding a series of events related to the open access movement and how we can redefine the impact of free and open resources on higher education.

How do textbook prices impact college students?

imageWe do know that nationally, students bear a high cost to attend college, but how much do textbook costs factor into these budgets?  In 2012, the Florida Student Textbook Survey was conducted by the Florida Virtual Campus (a network of public colleges in Florida). The researchers interviewed over 20,000 students from all 11 of Florida’s state universities.

Among the many survey goals, officials wanted to find out how much Florida students spent on textbooks during the Spring 2012 semester; the frequency with which students buy new textbooks; how students are affected by the cost of textbooks; what formats students prefer; and additionally, what students’ perceptions of the availability of textbooks in their institutions’ libraries actually is.

In brief, the researchers found several trends:

  • Textbook costs continue to take a toll on students financially and academically

  • Students use various means to reduce costs of textbooks, including purchasing books from a source other than the campus bookstore, renting textbooks, purchasing used books, selling their used books, and using copies on reserve at the campus library

  • Some institutions’ libraries provide textbooks for checkout, extending a lifeline to students who cannot afford to purchase a textbook

How Geneseo students feel about textbooks

Much of this was seen in our own informal polling of our students.  During the Spring 2012 semester, we conducted a brief survey to gage the attitudes of SUNY Geneseo students toward textbook prices. Though the response rate was small, we did receive some candid feedback:

“Sometimes, it makes me not want to take a class. I’m somewhat funding myself, so high costs of textbooks are a deciding factor for me.” — Sophomore

“Forced to get old outdated versions where the page numbers dont match up because buying the right/new version is too expensive.” — Junior

“I have to really think ahead and plan ahead to make sure I will have the money to buy my textbooks. There have been classes I haven’t taken because the cost of the textbooks has been too high for me to afford.” — Junior

“It is very expensive to buy textbooks. Generally my professors are honest about whether or not we will use the text during class, but sometimes I go through a whole semester without even opening it. Textbook buy-back stinks because I barely get a fraction of what I initially paid. Basically, it is an incredibly expensive addition to the already incredibly expensive cost of furthering my education. “ — Junior

“I had a work study job this year to cover various expenses, but with the costs of textbooks, I rarely had cash to spend. My parents are helping pay for my college education and they too are financially strained by how expensive the textbooks can be in addition to everything else we need to pay for.” — Freshman

Milne Library can’t do it alone

In an effort to mitigate some of the burden of purchasing textbooks, Milne Library has developed a Textbooks on Reserve collection. Currently, the collection consists of 787 unique titles — that’s roughly 72% of the unique titles assigned by faculty for the Fall 2013 semester. Although some of the titles were already in our collection, we rely heavily upon donations from faculty and students in order to stay current. Why? Because we simply cannot afford to buy the latest edition of each textbook every year.

FreeTextbookOur Textbook on Reserve collection also has limited reach. In order to ensure that as many students as possible can access the collection, students can only check out one book at a time for 4 hours. Since we often only have one or two copies of a book, not every student can access a copy when they need it most: often the night before an assignment is due.

Some students also try to borrow their textbooks through Information Delivery Services (IDS). However, this also has limitations. Many libraries do not allow us to borrow textbooks through interlibrary loan. We are often forced to borrow older or alternate editions. As with all materials we borrow from other libraries, due dates are often limited to 4-6 weeks — meaning students have to return the items before the end of the semester.

Where do we go from here?

We want to know your thoughts. Please respond to our blog post with your comments – how do textbook prices impact your educational experience at Geneseo?  What are some strategies or alternatives used to avoid buying a textbook?

Download and read the 2012 Florida Student Textbook Survey

New Common Core Textbooks!

my_mathWould you like to get your hands on the newest Common Core-aligned textbooks?

Milne Library has added new Math, Science, and ELA textbooks to its collection (Math and ELA include the common core standards).

Common Core Resources:

  • EngageNY.org – Common Core-aligned educational resources, instructional content, performance tasks, and assessment guidelines and materials developed by NYSED.
  • NYSED.gov – New York State P-12 Common Core Learning Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy and Core Curriculum.
  • commoncore.org – The Common Core Curriculum Mapping Project provides educators with high-quality, low-cost curriculum tools based on the Common Core State Standards for ELA.
  • NYSED.gov – Common Core Learning Standards for Mathematics and Core Curriculum.
  •  NCTM.org – Core Math Tools is a suite of interactive software tools and are appropriate for use with any HS mathematics curriculum and compatible with the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics.
  • School Library Journal – Common Core blog, chock-full of wonderful articles and resources to help in lesson planning.

For help finding these texts or if you have questions/concerns please contact Michelle Costello ([email protected]) CCTexts

What are we reading? Staff recommended reads for October

Are you looking for a good book to read?  Hundreds of thousands of books are published each year, so how does one choose? Read on for several Milne Library staff  book recommendations for the month of October.

In the mood for a spectacular YA fantasy?  Then read the following recommendation by Bill Jones, IDS Project Creative Technologist, for a truly amazing young adult novel:

The multiple award-winning YA novel, A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness, is a story filled with surreal illustrations and a captivating a-monster-callsstoryline that leaves the reader wondering what is in fact real and what is simply perceived to be.  The story is told through the eyes of a teenage boy named Conor, who describes his struggle in coming to terms with his mother’s cancer and the terrifying possibility of losing her.  Awakened from a nightmare, a monster comes to help Conor understand his future and admit truths that he holds deep inside.

Throughout the novel, the monster shares with Conor three stories to help him understand the truths of life and what lies ahead.  “The answer is that it does not matter what you think,” the monster said.  “Because your mind will contradict itself a hundred times each day. You wanted her to go at the same time you were desperate for me to save her. Your mind will believe comforting lies while also knowing the painful truths that make those lies necessary. And your mind will punish you for believing both.”

Check out Patrick Ness’ amazing three-part Chaos Walking Trilogy:  The Knife of Never Letting Go (2008), The Ask and the Answer (2010), and Monsters of Men (2010).
Download the free prequel of the trilogy, A New World, today from Amazon Kindle!

Special Collections Librarian Liz Argentieri recommends an Irish writer and a trilogy which broke numerous social and literary barriers when first released in the 1960s.

Edna O’Brien’s Country Girls trilogy includes The Country Girls (1960), The Lonely Girl (1962), Girls in Their Married Bliss (1964).  All three novels were then reissued together with an  Epilogue in 1987.country girls

The impetus to pick up Edna O’Brien’s Country Girls trilogy came from chancing upon a panel discussion of it on the Diane Rehm show last spring.  Dealing with growing up female and Catholic in mid-20th century Ireland, it sounded intriguing: controversial, daring, and literary.  And since I liked what I had read of O’Brien’s short stories, I thought I’d tackle her trilogy. I’m glad I did.

The novels center on Caithleen (“Kate”) Brady, mainly, and her friend Bridget (“Baba”) Brennan, whom we first meet as two young teenage girls living in a small Irish town and straining against the confines of their lives – as teenagers often will.  They are an unlikely pair, and I never did grow to like Baba. Throughout, she bullied Kate and quite literally led her astray, beginning with her orchestration of getting them both expelled from convent school (an opportunity Kate, whose mother had recently died and whose drunk of a father drifted in and out of her life (usually violently) could ill-afford to squander).  But Kate was not easy to root for either.  Watching her drift through her own life, allowing friends, family, and lovers to largely decide her course, often made for frustrating reading, and if it weren’t for her sweetness and vulnerability and the unfortunate events in her life that she truly was unable to control, I might have had less sympathetic feeling for her.

lonely girlThe tone and point of view of the narration shifts between Kate and Baba.  When Baba’s telling the story, the language is more lively, the attitude more devil-may-care, but I’m sure I sensed an underlying pathos in there, especially in the last novel and Epilogue, when the two had more or less “made their beds.”  A current of loneliness flows through Kate’s rather spare narrative voice, especially when she’s talking or thinking about her girlhood home, a run-down farm on the edge of town.  The language she uses to describe that place and her life there – which was not without happiness and love – evokes the stereotypical image of a rainy, damp, bleak Ireland.  The feeling carries through her days in Dublin as a shop girl and Baba’s reckless tag-along, her romantic misadventures with older married men, and her ultimate fate.

Are you a fan of contemporary literary fiction?  Librarian Kate Pitcher recommends Life After Life, the latest novel by Kate Atkinson:

Ursula Todd is born on a cold and blustery night in 1910, and then dies.  She is then reborn, living through her traumatic birth, until a tragic death by drowning.  Ursula is then reborn again, lives a happy but chaotic childhood and dies in a firebombing during World War II.   She is then reborn again.life after life

Kate Atkinson (author of the wonderful Jackson Brodie mystery novels; Case Histories, One Good Turn, When Will There Be Good News? and Started Early, Took My Dog) is an expert storyteller and a literary artist.  In her newest novel, she takes on an interesting device to tell the story of her heroine, Ursula Todd. What if your life didn’t really end at your death, rather, that your life is actually a series of lives as one person, and that you are destined to relive some of the same experiences over and over again, until you get it right?  This is the conceit that Atkinson employs to show Ursula’s development as a character and a person living through some of the worst calamities the human race has ever known – two World Wars and the almost entire destruction of people, namely those of the Jewish faith during the Holocaust.

Atkinson’s novel explores Ursula’s surreal sense of déjà vu and it works – the reader plays along and relives these lives; each one slightly different than the one prior, depending on how Ursula “learned” from that life.  What captures the reader’s imagination is the authors’ shaping of the narrative; how she uses the same plot and events, but almost every chapter reads like a different story.  It is a completely inventive and captivating story and engages the reader from page one, until the end, when we are left with the desire to relive those lives all over again.  Highly recommended, especially for fans of literary fiction and authors such as Margaret Atwood and Jennifer Egan.

2013.OctSR