Why use Primary Sources?

A Primary source is material created at the time of an historical event and provides a true account of that event or time period. They are a great way to expose students to multiple perspectives on past and present events and issues.

Identifying and finding primary sources can be a challenge, however, which may dissuade students from using them in their research. The video below, designed by librarians Sue Ann Brainard and Michelle Costello, introduces the plight of the Little Rock Nine and their integration struggles through the use of primary sources, such as images, oral histories, government documents and music.

Sue Ann Brainard – [email protected]

Michelle Costello – [email protected]

LittleRock9

Changes to NOVELNY subscription databases

NovelNYNOVELNY has replaced the databases Primary Search, Searchasaurus, and Kids’ Search with Kids InfoBits, and eLibrary Elementary.

infobitsKids InfoBits is a database created for students in Kindergarten through Grade 5. “It features a developmentally appropriate, visually graphic interface, a subject-based topic tree search and full-text, age-appropriate, curriculum-related magazine, newspaper and reference content for information on current events, the arts, science, health, people, government, history, sports and more” (Kids InfoBits, 2013).

For information on how to use this site visit the following tutorials:

_______________________________________________________

eLibELE_AnimWIDEeLibrary Elementary is “the ultimate elementary full-text reference resource — tailors all the media types and search functionality of eLibrary for the young reader and researcher. It’s an easy-to-use general reference database designed specifically to engage and guide younger students” (eLibrary Elementary, 2013).

For information on how to use this database visit the following tutorial

eLibrary Elementary [online image]. (2013). Retrieved August 22, 2013, http://www.proquestk12.com/productinfo/elibrary.shtml
eLibrary Elementary (2013). Retrieved from http://www.proquestk12.com/productinfo/elibrary_elementary.shtml
Kids InfoBits [online image]. (2013). Retrieved August 22, 2013, http://galesupport.com/novelny/#
Kids InfoBits (2013). Retrieved from http://www.gale.cengage.com/InfoBits/

Halloween Story-Time Celebration

story-timeHappy Halloween!

This event is sponsored by the Young Children’s Council and students from the School of Education. Any age is welcome, though these stories are geared toward the under-10 age group (appropriate for preschoolers).

Friday, October 25th
6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

The event will take place in the Teacher Education Resource Center, located on the lower-level of Milne Library.

Story-Time (performed by members of the Young Children’s Council) will have storytelling, refreshments, songs, crafts and trick-or-treating.

Costumes are optional and encouraged!

For more information or to RSVP (walk-ins are welcome!) send an email to Marissa Zinone – [email protected] or Michelle Costello – [email protected]

Halloweenstorytime

New Common Core Textbooks!

my_mathWould you like to get your hands on the newest Common Core-aligned textbooks?

Milne Library has added new Math, Science, and ELA textbooks to its collection (Math and ELA include the common core standards).

Common Core Resources:

  • EngageNY.org – Common Core-aligned educational resources, instructional content, performance tasks, and assessment guidelines and materials developed by NYSED.
  • NYSED.gov – New York State P-12 Common Core Learning Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy and Core Curriculum.
  • commoncore.org – The Common Core Curriculum Mapping Project provides educators with high-quality, low-cost curriculum tools based on the Common Core State Standards for ELA.
  • NYSED.gov – Common Core Learning Standards for Mathematics and Core Curriculum.
  •  NCTM.org – Core Math Tools is a suite of interactive software tools and are appropriate for use with any HS mathematics curriculum and compatible with the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics.
  • School Library Journal – Common Core blog, chock-full of wonderful articles and resources to help in lesson planning.

For help finding these texts or if you have questions/concerns please contact Michelle Costello ([email protected]) CCTexts

ERIC (eric.ed.gov) has a new look

ERIC

Screenshot of the new ERIC interface.

The public access version of ERIC (Education Resources Information Center) has a new website and a new logo.

The website’s new interface is much more “google-like” where users can search for keywords, author, and title at the same time in the search box or they can use single terms.

The streamlined approach means the advanced search screen is no longer available, however, users will still be able to limit to peer reviewed or full-text available content at the start of their search.

ERIC2

Screenshot of search results.

In addition, the results page allows for further refinement by letting users narrow their search to publication date, descriptor, source, author, publication type, education level or audience.

Additional features and content will be added on an ongoing basis, hopefully based upon browser feedback.

For more information visit ERIC or click on the note from the Commissioner.

ERIC

ERIC [online image]. (2013). Retrieved August 22, 2013, from: http://eric.ed.gov/

New Common Core Textbooks!

ComCorTexts

Would you like to get your hands on the newest Common Core-aligned textbooks?

Milne Library has added new Math, Science, and ELA textbooks to its collection (Math and ELA include the common core standards).

 

 

Here are a sampling of the new texts with call numbers:

  • Algebra 2 – curr CT 373.72 G485a 2012
  • Math (Course 1) – curr CT 373.7 G485g 2013
  • Life iScience – curr CT 373.357 G485l 2012
  • Earth Science: Geology, the Environment, and the Universe – curr CT 373.355 G485 2013
  • Reading Street Common Core – curr CT 372.41 Sco81rs 2013

Common Core Workshop:

April 10, 2013, 2:30pm-4:00pm, Newton 209
Why School Librarians can be a teachers best ally: Common Core support from the library (Jim Belair, Kathleen Jaccarino, Ann Fox & Howard Enis)

In this panel presentation school librarians will share their knowledge about the Common Core and the resources and collaboration services they can provide to help teachers understand and implement the standards. Librarians will be represented from an elementary school, middle school, high school and BOCES.  For more information about how School Librarians can help educators with the Common Core Standards, take a look at this article.

To register for the presentation click here.

For help finding these texts or if you have questions/concerns please contact Michelle Costello ([email protected])

Navigating the Common Core

comcoreDoes hearing the phrase “common core” make you want to scream and run away! Does it make you scratch your head in confusion?

If these two simple words conjure up feelings of anxiety, mistrust or bewilderment, rest assured that there are resources available to help you navigate the path to understanding and implementing the Common Core State Standards.

 What are the Common Core Standards?

The Common Core State Standards Initiative is a state-led effort coordinated by the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO). According to the CCSSO, the purpose of the standards is to “provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn, so teachers and parents know what they need to do to help them” (2012).

Forty-five states have adopted the new standards (including New York State) in hopes that students in every state will be held to the same level of expectations and that students will be college/career ready at commencement.

Challenges/Concerns

One of the many challenges or concerns about the common core is that it focuses on the knowledge and skills students should learn (the whys and whats) but not on the how to teach these skills. Instead of seeing it a challenge though, having the autonomy to teach in a creative and innovative manner can make owning the how a benefit.  There is help for teachers (and future teachers) in creating lessons that support the Common Core and on how to deliver those lessons.

Resources available to help in teaching the Common Core

In response to concerns over the Common Core, a plethora of resources have been created to help ease the transition, including; websites, books, articles, tutorials, & workshops (to name a few). Listed below are just a sampling of what is available.

Books (those owned by Milne Library include a call number)

  • Understanding Common Core State Standards by John Kendall (ISBN-13: 978-1416613312).
  • Pathways to the common core: Accelerating achievement by Lucy Calkins, Mary Ehrenworth, & Christopher Lehman – LB3060.83 .C36 2012
  • The core six: Essential strategies for achieving excellence with the common core by Harvey F. Silver, R. Thomas Dewing, & Matthew J. Perini – LB3060.83 .S576 2012
  • Common core mathematics in a PLC at work. Grades K-2 by Matthew R. Larson – QA13 .C5656 2012
  • Building number sense through the common core by Bradley S. Witzel, Paul J. Riccomini, & Marla L. Herlong – QA141 .W58 2013
  • Close reading of informational texts: Assessment-Driven instruction in grades 3-8 – Electronic resource
  • Common Core curriculum maps in English Language Arts, grades K-5 – curr CC 372.6 C657 2012
  • Common Core Curriculum Maps in English Language Arts: Grades 6-8 – Electronic resource
  • Supporting students in a time of core standards : English Language Arts, grades 9-12 by Sarah Brown Wessling, with Danielle Lillge, & Crystal VanKooten -LB1631 .W358 2011

Websites

  • EngageNY.org – Common Core-aligned educational resources, instructional content, performance tasks, and assessment guidelines and materials developed by NYSED.
  • NYSED.gov – New York State P-12 Common Core Learning Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy and Core Curriculum.
  • commoncore.org – The Common Core Curriculum Mapping Project provides educators with high-quality, low-cost curriculum tools based on the Common Core State Standards for ELA.
  • NYSED.gov – Common Core Learning Standards for Mathematics and Core Curriculum.
  •  NCTM.org – Core Math Tools is a suite of interactive software tools and are appropriate for use with any HS mathematics curriculum and compatible with the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics.
  • School Library Journal – Common Core blog, chock-full of wonderful articles and resources to help in lesson planning.

Articles

Videos/Tutorials

  • Teaching Channel – Contains videos on implementing the Common Core.
  • EngageNY – Common Core Video Series.
  • The Hunt Institute – a series of video vignettes that explain the Standards in far greater depth.
  • NYSED.gov – bringing the Common Core to Life videos.

Workshops

April 10, 2013, 2:30pm-4:00pm, Newton 209
Why School Librarians can be a teachers best ally: Common Core support from the library (Jim Belair, Kathleen Jaccarino, Ann Fox & Howard Enis)

In this panel presentation school librarians will share their knowledge about the Common Core and the resources and collaboration services they can provide to help teachers understand and implement the standards. Librarians will be represented from an elementary school, middle school, high school and BOCES.  For more information about how School Librarians can help educators with the Common Core Standards, take a look at this article.

To register for the presentation click here.

For questions or concerns about any of these resources, please contact Michelle Costello ([email protected])

CCSSO & NGA Center. (2012). Mission Statement. Retreived from http://www.corestandards.org/

Take a cruise with International Children’s Literature and help celebrate International Children’s Book Day!

Didn’t get a chance to get away this year for Spring Break? It’s not too late to explore a few new destinations!!

ICBDEmbark on a Global Book Cruise and visit exciting international destinations through picture books. Passengers on the cruise will enjoy read-alouds, crafts, games and snacks inspired by outstanding international children’s books.

Hosted by School of Education graduate students, this event is geared towards children in grades K – 2; though it is open to faculty, students and community members of any age.

Inspiration for this event came from The International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY) International Children’s Book Day (April 2nd).

The program will take place on Monday, April 1, 2013 from 5:30 – 7:00 PM in Milne Library’s Teacher Education Resource Center (Lower Level).

For more information please email Michelle CostelloCheryl Kreutter or Maria Perpetua Liwanag.

ship-world

ICBD-Books

Primary Sources: Hands-on History!

Using primary sources is an excellent technique for exploring historical events or topics. Knowing what a primary source is and finding concrete examples however, can be challenging. The video below, designed by librarians Sue Ann Brainard and Michelle Costello, introduces the plight of the Little Rock Nine and their integration struggles through the use of primary sources, such as images, oral histories, government documents and music.

This video is intended to be an introduction to a set of tutorials on specific research tools and techniques used to locate and access primary sources, to be created over the next year or so.

Please feel free to contact us with ideas for content and to let us know if you are interested in designing or developing future tutorials.

Sue Ann Brainard – [email protected]

Michelle Costello – [email protected]

Remembering a Newbery Award Winner

Between the ages of about 8 & 11, one of my fondest daydreams was about running away & living in a tree in the woods somewhere. Not a treehouse, but actually inside of a tree, one that I had hollowed out & turned into a snug hideaway. I’d make friends with rabbits, squirrels, & foxes (conveniently ignoring the fact that the last would most likely eat the first two), & live off the land. After all, if Sam Gribley did it, I could too!

If you read My Side of the Mountain, you’d recognize where my daydream came from. The book, written, in 1959, was one of author Jean Craighead George’s most widely known, with her Newbery Medal-winning book, Julie of the Wolves (1972), almost as well known. George passed away earlier this year at 92. In an interview with School Library Journal two years ago, she said that she wanted to be remembered as “…somebody who talked about nature, who awakened them [her readers] to a new world and helped them restore it.”

George’s interest in the natural world started at a young age, as her father was an entomologist who took her & her brothers (who both became wildlife scientists and conservationists) on numerous field trips. During her adult life George kept multiple animals at her home in Chappaqua, NY, including crows, owls, & beavers. George’s son, himself a wildlife biologist, pointed out that growing up around all the animals taught him that “they all have their own personalities. It makes you realize they’re not programmed automatons.” Harry Potter’s Hedwig and the other animals at Hogwarts would surely agree.

–Sherry Rhodes, Reference and Instruction Librarian at Milne Library

Click here for a list of George’s books