Integrative Teaching: The Classroom Meets Real Life

Rose-Marie Chierici speaks to patients at mobile clinic in Haiti

Rose-Marie Chierici speaks to patients at mobile clinic in HaitiOn Friday, April 25, 2014, the College will celebrate Dr. Rose-Marie Chierici, a dynamic Professor and Department Chair who has brought her field work in Haiti (Haiti Outreach-Pwoje Espwa, H.O.P.E.) to the Geneseo classroom. Dr. Chierici began her career at SUNY Geneseo in 1994, and was promoted (belatedly, in this librarian’s opinion) to Full Professor in August 2013. We now say goodbye to this inspirational teacher, researcher, and applied anthropologist . . . but not before she teaches one more course in Fall 2014.

Dr. Chierici first worked with Librarian Kim Davies-Hoffman in 2002 which sparked a long journey of efforts to infuse scholarly research skills into her students’ coursework. Between the two instructors, they experimented with many combinations of and approaches to teaching – from a one-time classroom visit from the librarian to a more collaborative and semester-long schedule of mini librarian visits, to the latest and most successful mixing of anthropological and development theory, practical on-the-ground skills, and research and technology training.

It is this last model of collaborative teaching that will keep Dr. Chierici on campus, in the classroom, for one more semester.

Opening ppt slide of a student-run presentation, 3Ts ConferenceIn March 2014, several students from Dr. Chierici’s course, ANTH 307: Third World Development, joined Kim Davies-Hoffman in a 3Ts Conference presentation that spotlighted the high-impact class experience that transformed typical college students into NGO development workers, if only for a semester. With a unique classroom structure, students learned anthropological and development theory on Tuesdays and became members of a simulated nongovernmental organization on Thursdays. The first few Thursdays were spent in class with Davies-Hoffman learning different research strategies and technological tools, but after that, two student-ran NGOs (M.A.R.K., Mothers Advocating for Reproductive Knowledge and The Epula Project) created their own destiny. With two team leaders guiding their respective NGO, students were responsible for researching and making crucial decisions for their project.

– In what region of the world would they focus their work?
– On what issue(s) would they focus their work?
– How would they discover enough detailed information to truly “know” the region and its people?
– What programs would they put into place to address their chosen development issue?

The culminating fruits of the NGOs’ labor was a 75-minute presentation to classmates, as well as respected professors and administrators on campus, supported by a project website that detailed all their research, ideas, and reflections. A follow-up conference presentation was icing on the cake as students had the opportunity to share their transformational learning experience with professionals (teachers, instructional designers, librarians, etc.) around New York State. A potential idea of pairing up with students at the Naples Central School District on similar NGO projects was discussed following the Geneseo students’ presentation.

Jordan Laux graduated in December 2013Since Fall 2013, many students of ANTH 307 have expressed their continued enthusiasm for the NGO experience, stating that it was the best class they have taken at SUNY Geneseo. As many of those students look to graduating in May and contemplate future career plans, development work has become a much more real possibility.  Jordan Laux (pictured on the far right), a member of and webmaster for M.A.R.K.,  graduated in December 2013 and has reported back on the immediate connections she has made from her lessons learned in Third World Development and her current daily work in Syracuse, NY.  Take a listen to what ANTH 307 and her experience working with Dr. Rose-Marie Chierici and Kim Davies-Hoffman has meant to Jordan.

 

Evenings at Milne Library Receive Consistent Research Support

Our new Academic Excellence Librarian, Daniel Ross

Our new Academic Excellence Librarian, Daniel RossWhile Milne Library welcomes Daniel Ross as our newest librarian, the Center for Academic Excellence (CAE) gains essential research coverage in the evenings. The newly created position of Academic Excellence Librarian provides a true win-win situation – both the library and the CAE benefit from evening supervision, extended and dedicated research assistance, and fresh eyes to work on developing programs that bring together all support services offered by the CAE.

Daniel Ross is no stranger to working late night hours at Milne Library – first as a SUNY Geneseo history student (Class of 2009) and then as our most recent part-time Evening/Weekend Manager during Spring 2013. After graduating from Geneseo, Dan completed an MLIS (Master of Library & Information Science) at Drexel University and has now returned to the Rochester area to build his professional career.

As the support services in the CAE –

– continue to grow and strengthen, the development of an Academic Excellence Librarian position seemed the perfect fit to more cohesively tie the CAE together as one unit.  This can be done through evening oversight of the center, marketing and development of center-based workshops, and compilation of usage statistics (i.e., how, when and why students are using the center). To this end, Dan Ross brings fresh ideas, organizational skills, and a solid understanding of what it means to be a Geneseo student.

Dan began his position on September 12 and we are excited to (re) introduce him to the college community.

Milne’s Center for Academic Excellence: New Name, Same Services

What once was Milne Library’s Writing & Learning Center – consisting of AOP tutoring services, the satellite center for the English Department’s Writing Learning Center, ELL tutoring and speech buddies program and the Geneseo Testing Center – has officially been renamed to better represent the many helpful services offered in the center.

Welcome to the Milne Center for Academic Excellence!

Center for Academic Excellence

Beginning in January 2012, the English Department’s Writing Learning Center shifted all operations to Milne’s location, supplementing its evening and weekend drop-in hours with regularly scheduled appointments Monday-Friday from 1-5 pm, which had traditionally taken place in Welles Hall.

The Center for Academic Excellence received a new facelift over the winter break as well – new carpeting, a glass panel in the front window, and potentially glass doors to separate the two rooms within the center – all in an effort to make the space comfortable and conducive to studying and testing.

Information regarding the services offered in the center can be found at a newly designed and comprehensive website.

Can I access my course texts for free?

image of a stack of textbooksWelcome back students!  We hope that you had a great summer and are looking forward to a very productive year.  We are so happy you’re back on campus.

With each new semester come new options for accessing your required course readings.  This academic year does not prove to be any different.

To find out if Milne Library can access your required readings for free (or low cost), see Milne Library’s guide to textbooks.