Government Documents Are Moving Back to Milne

GDocsCollectionThis summer, the library is moving our government documents back to Milne in preparation for building renovations in Fraser. The loss of the space in Fraser gave us opportunity to work with faculty across several disciplines in a re-evaluation of this collection. “We know that there just isn’t enough space to bring everything back to Milne. However, most of the material in this collection is available online. In fact, over 95% of materials currently published by the Government Printing Office are freely available in full-text online,” said Justina Elmore, Coordinator of the Government Documents Collection. “We spent last semester working with faculty to determine what and how much of this collection we could, and have room to, retain.”

Now that the size of the collection has been reduced to just the government documents that our patrons actually use, the library has begun the process of moving them back to Milne. Additionally, Milne Library will continue to offer quick delivery via IDS for any deselected items that are not yet online, should the need arise. Luckily, there are two Federal Depository libraries in the area from which to draw.

Bringing these materials back to Milne will make finding and using government documents easier. Most of the material will become part of the general collection, allowing us to reduce the number of places a researcher must look in order to find materials on a particular topic.

Daylight Saving Time begins Sunday, March 8.

springWhat is it?  Why do we do it?

Daylight-savings time (DST) is the advancing of the clock one hour ahead of the local standard time in order to increase the hours of daylight available at the end of the day.

The idea originated with none other than Benjamin Franklin in the 1700s.  But it didn’t really catch on until WWI when England and Germany put it into practice as a wartime measure for making full use of daylight hours.  By 1925, it became permanent in England.

The U.S. also took advantage of daylight savings for both World Wars, but it didn’t become a permanent fixture for most states until the oil crisis in the mid-1960′s. Now, all but two states in the U.S.(Arizona and Hawaii) observe DST.

Sources:
Summer Time. (2002). In Brewer’s Dictionary of Modern Phrase and Fable.
Worldatlas.com. (2014, Oct. 10). Daylight savings time: The exceptions. Retrieved from http://www.worldatlas.com/articles/daylight-savings-exceptions.htm

Where to find tax forms?

Photo credit: flickr user Images_of_Money

Photo credit: flickr user Images_of_Money

It’s tax season again…  Unfortunately, real life isn’t as simple as advancing past “go” and collecting our $200. Instead, we’ll be dusting off our calculators and filling out those forms.

You can find both Federal Tax Forms and New York State Tax Forms online.

Or check out these five great places to get tax forms or file online.

New Access to Experian’s Credit Data Reports

business_research-400x300Our ABI/INFORM database now has access to the Experian Commercial Risk Database, containing over 40 million credit data reports for both private and public companies, allowing researchers to see details such as contact information, size, industry, MSA, sales range, business type, bankruptcy information, credit risk, and more. These reports are full-text with coverage from December 10, 1980 to the present.

ABI/INFORM can be found under recommended databases on both the Business/Economics and Accounting/Auditing library research guides.

To find these reports, search ABI/INFORM for a company (e.g.“Ford Motor company”), then limit to reports (or limit further to just experian reports under publication title).

FindingExperianReports_ABI-INFORM

For more info on the new content, see the announcement on ProQuest’s blog.

Cancelled: Celebrating Geneseo Authors Event

EventCancelled
The Celebrating Geneseo Authors event that was to take place at 4:00 today has been postponed due to inclement weather.
Stay tuned for information on the new date and time.

Fall Back! Set Your Clocks Back on Sunday Nov. 2

Daylight Saving Time Ends on Sunday, Nov. 2nd and our clocks will need to be set back 1 hour.  Some of the clocks in the library are controlled by an electronic master clock and will reset automatically, but many are not.  We appreciate your patience as we work to update them!

fall_back

What is Daylight Savings Anyway?
Daylight-savings time is the advancing of the clock, usually in summer time, one hour ahead of the local standard time in order to increase the hours of daylight available at the end of the day.

The idea originated with none other than Benjamin Franklin in the 1700s.  But it didn’t really catch on until WWI when England and Germany put it into practice as a wartime measure for making full use of daylight hours.  By 1925, it became permanent in England.

The U.S. also took advantage of daylight savings for both World Wars, but it didn’t become a permanent fixture for most states until the oil crisis in the mid-1960’s.

Find out more at timeanddate.com.

Pillows/Matresses Raise Awareness of Sexual Assault on Campus

CarryThatWeightTogetherYou may see pillows and/or mattresses carried around campus tomorrow [Wednesday, October 29, 2014]. Students, faculty and staff on college campuses across the country are taking collective action to support survivors of sexual and domestic violence on college campuses by carrying a pillow or mattress.

This national day of action is inspired by the activism and art of Emma Sulkowicz at Columbia University and led by Columbia student activists. Emma carries a mattress with her as part of a performance art piece to protest the dismissal of her rape report by campus officials at Columbia University.

The day of action aims to raise awareness about the prevalence of sexual and domestic violence, advocate for better campus policies, and challenge rape culture. To find out more and share photos of the efforts of students on our campus visit the Carry That Weight website.

Milne’s updates its Ask A Librarian page

Libanswers News Slider1Milne Library’s Ask A Librarian webpage just got a facelift! The new page is better integrated with our chat and library subject guides. Added functionality on this page allows users to search through Frequently Asked Questions, submit a question of their own or contact a reference librarian via phone, text, email, chat, or by scheduling a one-on-one consultation.

Be sure to update your bookmarks to libanswers.geneseo.edu.

Leading the Way for Better Library Instruction

Three instructors, five team leaders, 37 participants, 5 regional locations in New York, and 963 miles travelled; this, the winning equation for a summertime road trip of the third Library Instruction Leadership Academy (LILAC).

NYSDr. Brian Morgan of the Ella Shear Cline School of Education joined librarians Michelle Costello and Kim Davies Hoffman, along with many other co-Principal Investigators on the IITG planning team, to design a LILAC like none before. After offering two local instances of the academy (2010 & 2013), meant to train librarians new to instructional roles in foundational pedagogical methods, LILAC 3 aims to widen the audience throughout New York State. The first stage included five full-day workshops (over a two-week period) in various regions of the state, in an attempt to reach as many participants as possible – Potsdam, Saratoga Springs, Highland, Rochester, and Ithaca. Dr. Morgan provided a thorough grounding in pedagogical theory and Michelle and Kim followed with demonstrations of that theory into the practice of library instruction. Students were immersed in the theory as they contemplated their professional content through hands-on and collaborative activities

Giving LILAC participants a three-week break to resume their typical fall semester routine, online modules for the academy picked up on Monday, September 15, beginning with a focus on librarian interactions with students and collaborations with faculty and community members. Three more two-week modules will be spread out until mid-November and participants will culminate their learning with multiple final projects (a progressively developed lesson plan, a usable digital asset that can be used to supplement a class lesson or used to promote library services, and an action plan for a project personalized to each participant’s library).

LILAC 3 is not only meant to educate its participants, but its developers too. Module presenters are experimenting with new technologies to translate the typical LILAC content into asynchronous learning. The regional leaders have been immersed in the LILAC experience since the time of IITG proposal writing, so that they might sustain in future years such professional development opportunities in their local regions.

Security Issues for Internet Explorer

IE-blogIf you use Internet Explorer, you may want to check out what CIT NewsBytes has to say about protecting yourself from the latest hacking vulnerabilities in IE.

For now, CIT recommends updating your IE browser and using IE “only for Geneseo websites that require IE. All non-Geneseo websites should be accessed with an alternate browser (Firefox, Google Chrome, etc.).”

Check the CIT NewsBytes for updates on this security issue.