Just how busy is Milne Library?

Milne will be open 24/5 during Finals Week

24 hours image

CC-BY image courtesy of Flickr user Marcin Wichary

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be in the library in the middle of the night? You’ll soon get your chance to find out!

Milne Library will be open 24 hours a day during Finals Week, with the minor exception of Friday and Saturday nights. This is a pilot program in response to student requests heard loudly and clearly!

  • Study Day, May 4: Open at 7:30 am and remain open until late Friday night (1 am)
  • Saturday, May 7: Open at 9:30 am and close at 1 am
  • Sunday, May 8: Open at 9:30 am and remain open until Wednesday at 7 pm.

See the table below for specific details:

Date Hours
  Wednesday, May 4 (Study Day)   7:30 am to 24 hours
  Thursday, May 5   24 hours
  Friday, May 6   24 hours to 1:00 am
  Saturday, May 7   9:30 am to 1:00am
  Sunday, May 8   9:30 am to 24 hours
  Monday, May 9   24 hours
  Tuesday, May 10   24 hours
  Wednesday, May 11   24 hours to 10:00 pm

 

Getting the Most From Google Scholar, or, Squirrels are Friends, not Food

SquirrelScholarEditor’s Note: This guest post was written by Geneseo alum and former Milne Library intern Margaret Craft, when she was a senior here last year. It’s always good to revisit this information!

I’m sure when you think of Google, you think of fuzzy dogs, craigs list, and the strange questions Google helpfully fills in for you, including

and the deepest most applicable question lingering at our core:

When can you eat squirrel?

…which a truly desperate college student on Geneseo’s campus might start to wonder, as the meal plan dwindles and you keep losing staring contests. (Vegans: it’s okay. Keep reading, it gets better, maybe.)

Squirrel

Day after day, eventually you start to wonder what you couldn’t eat those little buggers on. Pizza? Other squirrels?

This might require some research. For all you know, studies at Geneseo may have found a significant portion of squirrels have secret identities and should therefore be protected, not baked.

Superhero squirrel

What you, the savvy Geneseo student, would thus benefit from using is the mind-bogglingly awesome part of Google devoted to this need, sneakily hidden under products. Yes, indeed this grail of searching is none other than GOOGLE SCHOLAR, a versatile research tool that looks for your search terms in articles, patents, and book citations.

On the homepage it tries to be modest and say it only looks for articles, but it will search for books as well. Such results will appear with a [BOOK] designation at the beginning of the citation.

Once you’ve typed a search term in, such as “squirrel,” you’ll be shown a master list of all results.

Google Scholar search results

You may note that the third result on the list concerns movement representations in squirrel monkeys, which, while adorable are not a viable food source on Geneseo’s campus and thus not your concern.

To get rid of squirrel monkey results, you can exclude the word “monkey” in the advanced search. Clicking on the arrow next to the search box pulls up the advanced search functions.

Advanced search

To get rid of squirrel monkey results, you can exclude the word “monkey”:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.26.42 PM

You can further narrow results down by using the exact phrase option:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.26.34 PM

and now the top result (no superhero squirrel research in sight, sadly) based on my choice to sort by relevancy  is:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.28.08 PM

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.31.59 PMBummer. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a not so fun thing where your brain degenerates through infection by proteins called prions. Apparently it is possible to contract the disease through eating the brains of squirrels that are infected with these prions. However, when I look at more recent results by asking Google to only look for results in the last 14 years, I get this article, which is directly available for free through the link for Springer at the right:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.32.13 PM

It concludes that it is unlikely that infectious prions will appear in red squirrels. Whew. But maybe we have gray squirrels…

Underneath the citation and excerpt, you can see how many times it has been cited, none in this case, and how many websites have the full text available (All 11 versions). The link for “Related articles” at the far left will show related materials that includes others more recent than this article, these may include other types of squirrels. There is also the option to cite the article directly or save it to “my library,” which is a personalized memory bank that will keep track of citations you’re interested in.

Now the varied danger of eating squirrel brains is corroborated by another article that talks about more than just red squirrels:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.35.38 PM

It has been cited by 11 other more recent articles, which could be useful for further research into the topic. Additionally, there is no link to a free version to the right of the citation, meaning none of the 8 versions showed are available for free download. Boo.

You could cry, but wait! There should be, if you are on Geneseo’s wifi network or using an on-campus computer, a “Get It” link to the right of all articles. It may also be listed under “More” under the citation as well. This will take you to the glorious IDS request page, which should get you the article within 48 hours! REJOICE PEOPLE.

And if you are not on-campus, there is an alternative. Click “Settings” on this menu:

Google Scholar settings

What will appear is this:

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.39.04 PM

Type, as I have, SUNY Geneseo and hit search.  Check the box next to “Milne Library, SUNY Geneseo – Get it”.

Now hit “Save” and you will return to your search.  Now when you look to the right of a citation, you should see the Get It next to it, or More below the citation itself.

Happy searching*!

*Just remember to research before you eat. You never know.

Screen Shot 2014-02-07 at 12.40.46 PM

*Vegans: it’s okay. Keep reading, it gets better.

 

Scholarly sources and reliable news sources about the Ebola outbreak

This post was originally published on the Scientific American Blog, Information Culture, on September 29, 2014.

While there has been some high quality news reporting about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, it is also easy to find vague, misleading or erroneous information about the disease and the outbreak. News related to the outbreak may also prompt more folks to explore the scholarly scientific literature on the subject.  The list below contains some reliable information sources on the topic.

The U.S. National Library of Medicine’s Disaster Information Management Research Center released an excellent guide to Ebola information resources. Many of the links in this post are also available from the NLM guide.

General information about the disease

News stories and collections

Scholarly materials

The National Library of Medicine has initiated an Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) for scholarly papers related to Ebola. The EAI is a partnership between the National Library of Medicine (the folks behind the PubMed biomedical research database) and the companies and organizations that publish scholarly articles. The EAI allows healthcare professionals, policy makes, librarians, and others involved in a health disaster event to temporarily access scholarly articles on the topic that would generally only be available to subscribers. Affected folks hoping to access the information need to login at the EAI site, then continue on to PubMed.  Once you get to PubMed, you can limit your search to articles available for free through the program. The current EAI allows access until October 17, 2014.

Many publishers have put together collections of ebola related articles available for free on their websites, including:

Of particular interest is an interactive map and timeline of the outbreak, discussed in detail by Larry Greenemeier on the Scientific American website.

 

The HealthMap of the Ebola outbreak

Governmental websites

This list is only a small portion of the high quality information sources available. Feel free to share your go-to high-quality information resources in the comments.

New publication by SUNY Geneseo’s Judy Albers examines Entrepreneurship in New York

SUNY researchers today released a study that shows New York State’s innovation profile is one of the strongest in the nation, and that continued focus on bolstering the upstate economy through Governor Cuomo’s START-UP NY program will be especially key to future growth and national competition for investment.

Entrepreneurship in New York is a joint collaboration by SUNY, the Research Foundation for SUNY (RF), SUNY Levin Institute, and SUNY Geneseo. This study shows that New York now commands a larger share of national venture investment than in past studies. Although, within this picture a significant disconnect is revealed. New York’s strong performance in academic R&D in the sciences stands in contrast with the relatively modest amounts of private investment available to move these innovations forward commercially.

Albers blog slider image (1)

Academic Research and Development (R&D) expenditures in New York State were $5.3 billion in 2012, second only to California. Additionally, the state’s share of venture capital invested nationally rose from 4 percent ($1.2B of $29.9B) in 2007 to 7 percent ($1.8B of $26.5B) in 2012, according to the report.

The SUNY study also found, however, that while New York’s innovation profile is on the rise, the majority of investment is funneled to New York City and that statewide, there remains a disconnect between strong academic research and the private investment needed to bring innovations to market. START-UP NY, which creates tax-free business zones in college communities, is cited as a unique opportunity to close the gap.

“New York is headed in the right direction, quickly becoming a more attractive destination for entrepreneurs and investors,” said SUNY Chancellor Nancy L. Zimpher. “While Governor Cuomo’s leadership has positioned our campuses to ramp up research and development, create jobs, and drive the economy, it is increasingly critical that the business climate upstate stay on pace not only with academia’s growth but with investment in New York City, and this study can show us how.”

“New York’s universities, both public and private, conduct more than $5 billion in research every year, and we want to create and sustain an environment in New York where those innovations can thrive,” said Dr. Tim Killeen, RF president and SUNY vice chancellor for research. “This study helps us understand the investment climate into which faculty, researchers, and students are bringing their innovations and ideas, and together with Governor Cuomo’s START-UP NY, it can guide us toward a more business-friendly and prosperous state economy.”

Carol Long, president of SUNY Geneseo, said, “The entrepreneurial drive of our young people will shape the future of our economy, but as this study shows, we must find investors willing to bring their dreams to life. We believe that the governor’s innovation agenda can make a real difference in the Finger Lakes region and throughout New York State, and we are proud to be a part of this important study.”

The study is authored by Van Arsdale Chair of Entrepreneurship at SUNY Geneseo Judith Albers, Ph.D., and RF Director of Business and Investor Development Thomas R. Moebus.

The complete study, Entrepreneurship in New York: The Mismatch Between Venture Capital and Academic R&D, is available online. It can also be downloaded for free as an e-book via open SUNY, or purchased in paperback, from Amazon.com.

Authors

Judith Albers, Ph.D.

Dr. Judith Albers, the Van Arsdale Chair of Entrepreneurship at SUNY Geneseo, and a respected voice in the innovation community of upstate New York, was the study’s lead researcher. “While the investment dollars in the state have increased,” said Dr. Albers, “a more detailed analysis indicates that the increase has been focused heavily on ‘soft tech’ in New York City.  In comparison, ‘hard tech’ companies in either upstate or downstate New York have a much smaller chance of securing funds to launch and grow. Start-ups in the life sciences face the most serious challenges.”

Thomas R. Moebus

Co-author Thomas Moebus, Director of Business and Investor Development at the Research Foundation for SUNY, said “The increase in venture investment in New York City suggests the potential for greater links between upstate opportunities and New York City investment to fuel entrepreneurial growth in fields like IT and services around the state.”

About the publication

Milne Library is very pleased to publish Entrepreneurship in New York and support the dissemination of this significant research report on the nature of venture investment in New York by the authors. Special thanks to Allison Brown, Milne’s Editor and Production Manager for making this and other works possible. More information about Milne Library’s Scholarship & Publishing Services is available online.

Internships available in Milne Library for Fall 2014

Milne Library has openings for student interns for the fall semester.

While we can’t offer you a paycheck, internships at Milne offer course credit and some other distinct advantages:

  • On campus
  • No one will ask you to make coffee
  • The only photocopying you will do will be for your own projects
  • You’re here anyway, might as well get 2-4 course credits
  • Library staff are dedicated to making your internship a learning experience
  • Experience working in a library or on publishing projects will look good on your resume

InternshipInternships in Milne will be geared towards your interests, related to services and projects the library is working on. While the amount of credit you can receive for internships varies, most library internships work best at the 2-4 credit hour level (about 5 to 11 hours per week).

Milne Library internships are ideal for students who are interested in exploring careers in publishing, libraries, archives or museums.

We are seeking interns related to:

Library Reference – For students who love library research and are considering a career as a librarian, this internship will give you hands on experience assisting students and faculty with their research at our reference desk.  Interns will receive comprehensive training and mentoring.  Interns will also have the opportunity to develop special projects such as tutorials, research guides or other tools to assist students with research.

Editing and publishing – Milne Library Scholarship and Publishing Services is seeking interns to assist with editorial and production tasks ranging from preparing manuscripts for text layout and production using Adobe InDesign, to copyediting and proofreading manuscripts using track changes in MS-WORD. Depending on skills and needs, internship may also be focused on specific areas of publishing, such as; marketing or graphic design.

Book marketing – Milne Library Scholarship and Publishing Services is seeking Book Marketing Interns to assist with marketing tasks for a range of publications, including; Open SUNY Textbooks, Special Collections Reprints, and other publications. Intern will evaluate book marketing strategies, develop and conduct marketing material and strategies for forthcoming titles.

Library Special Collections – The Milne Library Technical Services unit is looking for a student interested in learning and applying new skills in special collections and archives practice; digitization, metadata and collection management. Most suitable for students interested in history, museums, archives, or libraries.

Students interested in any library internships can contact Milne Library Business Manager Ryann Fair ([email protected], 585.245.5591).

Can’t access library databases? Try clearing your browser cache.

A recent security update to Milne Library’s EZProxy system (the system that permits off campus use of library databases) has lead to problems for some library users.

Clicking on a bookmarked database link or a link from the homepage may result in an error message related to the SSL certificate, or the browser may simply freeze.

If you are experiencing this issue, try clearing your browser cache. WikiHow provides step-by-step directions to clear your cache for most browsers.

SSL Certificate issue

 

If you are still having problems, stop by the library to talk with our Tech Help staff or call us at 585-245-5608.

Student use of Milne Library: What you told us and what we’re going to do about it

Last fall, Milne Library staff distributed a survey on library tables asking students why and how they used Milne Library spaces. We also asked students for suggestions about how the spaces could be improved. We are grateful to those of you who took the time to fill out the survey and turn it in – your responses will help us plan future improvements to the library.

General thoughts:
We received 456 responses, pretty evenly distributed among the three floors of the library.

Overall, students are hard at work in our library. Students spend their time doing homework, studying, writing and working on projects. Smaller numbers of students are visiting with friends, eating lunch or passing time on the internet (mostly in association with more serious endeavors).

Students choose seats based on their particular studying needs. While many students indicated that they need to concentrate (and selected spaces on the third floor as a result), others needed to be around people or needed space to spread out.  In some cases, students selected space out of necessity – it was the only spot available. Some students suggested that the comfortable seating was great for naps, while others used the comfy chairs for intense reading.

Power:
One of the biggest complaints (in certain areas) was the lack of power outlets. As we renovate new areas, we will endeavor to add power. This isn’t cheep, however, and requires extensive prior planning. Our 50 year old building wasn’t equipped to handle modern power demands, so most additional power outlets require upgrades to our electrical network.

The survey responses provided us with several locations where additional power outlets would be appreciated the most.

Screen Shot 2014-02-12 at 11.18.14 AM

Students also identified areas where outlets or study carrel lights weren’t working, and we are working hard to make the necessary repairs.

Suggestions and changes:
We got some great feedback on the type of tables students like. With a few dissenters, students really don’t like the new Y-shaped tables on the main floor.  A few even tried to explain why:

Screen Shot 2014-02-12 at 11.19.37 AM

We won’t be buying more of those.

Students also recommended filling spaces with a variety of table sizes, in order to avoid problems when one person takes up a table intended for six. We intend to remodel some spaces on the lower level of Milne this summer, and we are taking these suggestions into account when ordering tables.

Screen Shot 2014-02-12 at 11.20.41 AM

In areas where students had access to whiteboards, they expressed how much they like them. As a result, we will be looking for places to add additional whiteboards (as money allows).

There were a few suggestions that we won’t be able to accommodate.  We won’t be adding a fourth floor or getting a new building any time soon (unfortunately). We will not be adding a hot tub, an open bar, a bouncy castle or a taco bell. While turning the library into a TARDIS (bigger on the inside) would help with our not-enough-space issues, our technical staff (while extraordinary) have not quite figured out how to do this. Sorry.

Fotor0212112725

 

It’s cold in here. We agree. We’re working on it.

Our recent student survey has further illustrated what library staff have known for many weeks:  it’s cold in here.  Colder than usual, it seems.  I’ve tried working with gloves on, my colleague in the next cubicle routinely works with her coat on, and several library staff have been known to keep lap blankets at work.

As we joke about thermal underwear, rechargeable hand warmers and the relative warmth of fleece vs. wool we all ask: can’t they just turn up the heat?

Unfortunately, turning up the heat isn’t as easy as you’d think.

thermometer

Unfortunately, cold temperatures outside mean cold temperatures inside.

The library was built in 1966 before almost all students and many library staff were born. Keeping 47-year old heating systems going is a challenge.   47 years of renovation have created rooms that are warmer than others, rooms cold enough to use as refrigerators, and the changing layout of our spaces has changed the airflow around the library.

So the folks that keep the heat running in the winter and the air conditioning going in the summer have gone back to basics, looking up the original blue prints of the building in an effort to figure out how to get more warm air to the parts of the library that need it.

We aren’t sure yet if we’ll be able to make any changes – replacing the entire system isn’t an option – but we’ll keep you up to date.  Hopefully the library won’t have to purchase staff uniforms:

nigel-cabourn-everest-parka-jacket-01

Hacking Scopus: Finding Journal Articles in the Sciences and Social Sciences

HScopusHere at Geneseo, Scopus is your go-to source for finding scholarly articles in the sciences (biology, chemistry, geological sciences, physics astronomy, mathematics, etc.) and social sciences (psychology, communication, sociology, etc.)  There are other tools that provide more depth coverage in some of these disciplines, but Scopus is often a good start.

Here are a few tips and tricks to help you get the most out of this high quality resource.

First, take advantage of the built in filtering tools.

Most folks start with a broad search with just a couple of search terms:

squirrels and hibernation

And you often get lots of results – too many to actually look through.  So take advantage of the filtering tools in Scopus.  On the right hand side, click on the arrow next to the “keyword” heading.  Click “View more” a couple of times and you are left with a list of terms.  Scopus has analyzed your search results and counted up the keywords identified by the article authors.  You can click one or more of these boxes to filter your results to get a smaller set of articles.  This keyword filter can also act as a useful tool to help you narrow down a project topic.

Scopus keyword filtering

Second, let Scopus help you make connections between different pieces of the scholarly literature.

Journal articles don’t live in a vacuum.  The results, experiments and studies discussed in each article have roots in the results, experiments and studies of other researchers.  It’s how the scholarly enterprise works.

The first thing to do is the check out the bibliography of a promising journal article. You can do this once you get your hands on the article, but Scopus can give you a head start, especially for articles you need to order through IDS.  Just click on the title of any article and scroll to the bottom to see the bibliography and convenient “Get It” buttons for journal articles.

Scopus References

 

Next, you want to find out which other scholars thought that your promising article was important enough to their research to cite in their bibliography.  In Scopus, scroll to the top of the page for the article, then click on the number in the “Cited by” box.  Here you can browse a list of articles that cited your original article.

Scopus Cited By

Tracking citations in this way is a great way to find additional sources, and it can often make connecting those sources easier.

Third, take advantage of the “Related Documents” box that appears on the right hand side of each article page in Scopus.  For each article listed, Scopus analyzes its bibliography and finds other articles that cite the same sources.

Scopus Related

 

Hopefully these tips and tricks will help you use Scopus more efficiently so you can find your references and get started with your projects faster.

What are your favorite Scopus tools?