Plagiarism Workshops

PlagiarismpicFEb4and5Students plagiarize for many reasons, including procrastination, panic, and lack of understanding about how to paraphrase, quote, and cite properly. In this workshop taught by librarians, students will discuss plagiarism scenarios, understand the importance of using original ideas and language, and learn how to incorporate paraphrases and quotes into their writing.
Instructor: Librarians Milne Library

Thursday, February 4, 4:00 – 4:50 pm in Milne 104

OR

Friday, February 5, 2:30 – 3:30 pm in Milne 104

[Register for Ruby Certificate Credit]

Grief and Campus Counseling Services

Grief is a complicated emotion that affects us in many different ways.** It can be messy, confusing, prolonged, consuming and can sneak up on us at odd times. Grief can make us think differently about the world around us, about our safety and our loved ones. It can be all of these things, or none of them. It can change with time.

As we near the end of a very difficult week, Lauderdale Center for Student Health and Counseling would like to offer a list of resources for you to refer to now, or in the future. We would also like to encourage you to look after one another, pay attention to the signs and signals associated with prolonged grief, and to seek support whenever you are are in need.

Student Resources:
Counseling Services
are available Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday from 8:00am-5:00pm andTuesday from 8:00am-7:00pm in Lauderdale.
CARE Services (support and referrals to on and off campus resources): [email protected]
The WARM Line (general support from a certified specialist): 585-563-7470
Lifeline (general support or support for suicidal thoughts): 1-800-310-1160

Mobile Crisis of Livingston County (24/7 crisis support and evaluation) 585-255-0288
Pathways (general support from a student peer advocate): 585-237-8860 or online chat
Off campus therapists
: http://www.geneseo.edu/health/off-campus_referral
Domestic Violence 24-hour Hotline: (888) 252-9360, http://www.chancesandchanges.org/
Wyoming County Crisis/Information and Referral Hotline: (800) 786-3300
Upcoming Group Support/Group Discussion for students:
Wednesday January 27, 2016
All College Hour – 2:30pm-3:45pm
Bailey 102

Upcoming Group Support/Group Discussion for student athletes:
Wednesday January 27, 2016
All College Hour – 2:30pm-3:45pm
Bailey 103

Additional counselors available for walk in appointments:

March 7th – 11th from 9am-5pm (week before Spring break)
May 2nd – 13th from 9am-5pm (week before and during final exams)
May 14th (graduation day)

​Faculty and Staff Resources:​
Counseling Services is available for consultations on Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday from 8:00am-5:00pm and Tuesday from 8:00am-7:00pm in Lauderdale.
NYS Employee Assistance Program (during the day): (585) 245-5740
NYS Employee Assistance Program (after hours): 1-800-822-0244
Off campus therapist referrals: 1-800-THERAPIST (1-800-843-7274)
Upcoming Group Support/Group Discussion for faculty:
Wednesday January 27, 2016
All College Hour – 2:30pm-3:45pm

Bailey 104

Upcoming Group Support/Group Discussion for staff:

Wednesday January 27, 2016
All College Hour – 2:30pm-3:45pm
Bailey 101

All:
If you are in need of support that is not provided on this list, please contact Counseling Services at 585-245-5716.

As this semester continues we hope that you will pay attention to your own internal cues for stress, anxiety, depression and grief and, instead of struggling alone, will look to us for support and guidance.  We also hope that you will look out for one another, share your concern, and alert someone who can help.

You are never alone.

[**The text of this post comes from an email from Erin Halligan-Avery in Lauderdale Center for Student Health and Counseling.]

Pilot: What is VoiceThread? We Need Your Help!

VThreadAre you looking for new ways to engage students? SUNY Geneseo is piloting a trial of VoiceThread and needs your feedback.

VoiceThread is an interactive collaborative learning tool that can be used to enhance student engagement outside of the classroom or in online environments. With VoiceThread, instructors and/or students can create, share, and comment on images, PowerPoint presentations, videos, audio files, documents, and PDFs using microphone, webcam, text, phone, and audio-file upload. At SUNY Geneseo, VoiceThread is an external tool that integrates into myCourses.

VoiceThread can be used in many different ways to enhance classroom learning experiences. Use it for flipping instruction, discussions outside of class, critiquing work, remediation, or practicing language skills.

A couple of examples to consider (more below):

Accessing VoiceThread

You may access VoiceThread in two ways: in myCourses and through Geneseo’s VoiceThread Website.

myCourses access:  Adding VoiceThread to your course

  • Navigate to your course.
  • Click “Add Content”.
  • Select “External Tool”.
  • Give the activity a title.
  • For tool provider, select “VoiceThread”.
  • Check the box that says “Enable grading”.
  • Save changes.

For more information on how to create your first thread visit – https://voicethread.com/howto/angel/

 

Geneseo VoiceThread Website:

Faculty and students are also able to create a Voicethread without using Angel, visit https://geneseo.voicethread.com and register with a geneseo.edu email account.

 

VoiceThread Support Team:

If you would like to learn more about VoiceThread or want assistance setting it up for your course, contact:

Brandon West: [email protected]

Michelle Costello: [email protected]

 

Additional Links

Learn more about VoiceThread’s Features:

Additional Examples of VoiceThread in the Higher Ed Classroom:

 

Writing in College: From Competence to Excellence [an Open SUNY Textbook]

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Writing in College: From Competence to Excellence By Amy Guptill, with contributions by Aly Button, Peter Farrell, Kaethe Leonard, and Timothée Pizarro.

Please join me in congratulating Amy Guptill on her publication of Writing in College: From Competence to Excellence, the newest Open SUNY Textbook!

Many high school students have mastered writing conventions but still struggle to understand and meet the expectations at the college level. Other students, perhaps out of school for a number of years, are getting reacquainted with academic writing while working to meet college-level challenges. Writing in College demystifies college-level expectations, helping students see the purpose behind the varied writing assignments they face.

Guptill skillfully positions specific and applicable advice about college writing within the larger framework of transitioning to the culture of the academy and college-level expectations. In addition, chapters can be read independently and assigned separately, and each is accompanied by further resources, suggested exercises, and advice from other student writers.

Writing in College: From Competence to Excellence

 Available as ebook and PDF downloads, as well as online, at: textbooks.opensuny.org/writing-in-college-from-competence-to-excellence/

 

About the Textbook

Writing in College: From Competence to Excellence is designed for students who have largely mastered the conventions of high-school level writing and are now rising to meet more the advanced expectations of college. Students will find in Writing in College a warm invitation to think of themselves as full, self-motivated members of the academic community. With concise explanations, clear multi-disciplinary examples and empathy for the challenges of student life, this short textbook both explains the purposes behind college-level writing and offers indispensable advice for organization and expression.

 

About the Author

Amy Guptill is an Associate Professor of Sociology at The College at Brockport, SUNY where she has a joint appointment with the Delta College Program, an alternative interdisciplinary General Education option. Her research focuses on spatial and structural shifts in agriculture and food systems with recent work on innovative agricultural marketing. She teaches courses in the sociology of food, development and globalization, community and social change, social statistics and college writing. In addition to Writing In College: From Competence to Excellence, she is the coauthor of a recent college textbook entitled Food & Society: Principles and Paradoxes (Malden, MA: Polity, 2012).

 

Value of Open Access Textbooks

The author is thrilled to offer this book as an open textbook. The cost of commercial textbooks is an urgent and growing problem, and all students should have easy access to advice about how to get the most out of the hundreds of pages of writing they’ll do over the course of a four-year degree.

Licensed for reuse and remix, the Open SUNY Textbooks are a valuable addition to the open access textbook community. Freely available, the open access content is peer reviewed by fellow instructors and scholars for quality and then copy-edited before publication. Open textbooks are just one component of the open educational resources movement (OER) and provide high quality, reusable material for course instructors to create cost savings for students and institutions.

 

About Open SUNY Textbooks

The SUNY Textbook program is a creative means to improving access to educational materials while fostering a community of resources that spans disciplines and encourages interdisciplinary study. SUNY Libraries and faculty are leading SUNY’s open textbook publishing initiative and have already saved thousands of dollars for SUNY students. Having published 12 free online textbooks, with 14 more planned in the next 18 months, this innovative multi-institutional program is lowering the cost of textbooks for students in New York and beyond.

Open textbooks are available to everyone free of charge. Over 50,000 downloads of Open SUNY Textbooks occurred between February 1, 2015-December 14, 2015, with visitors and readers from all over the world. For program details, please visit http://textbooks.opensuny.org