Women’s Studies: 40 Years Strong!

WMSTSlider
Members of the Womyn’s Action Coalition show their pride

Check out the Women’s Studies 40th Anniversary display in Milne library, through March 1st.

See photos and statements by alumni on how Women’s Studies is important to them; timelines, posters, and documents on the history of our program; faculty publications, and interactive displays about our activity and history here on Geneseo’s campus.

The Women’s Studies program is governed by a coordinator and an Advisory Committee of faculty across many disciplines and students representing the academic program and co-curricular programs like Womyn’s Action Coalition (WAC), Voices for Planned Parenthood (VOX), and Pride.

WMSTFB1For up-to-date information on upcoming events related to women and gender studies, “like” their Facebook Page.

Do you have further questions? For answers, or to declare a minor or concentration in Women’s Studies, please see Melanie Blood, Coordinator, in Welles 217A.

What are we reading? Staff recommended reads for February

Are you looking for a good book to read and an escape from your studies for a short while?  Libraries and bookstores have thousands of books that might fit the bill. Staff have selected a few choice ones to highlight for the month of February.

Do you enjoy fantasy? Education & Instructional Design Librarian Michelle Costello recommends Magic’s Price by Mercedes Lackey:

magic priceThis is the last book in Lackey’s The Last Herald Mage trilogy and is definitely the strongest and most interesting of the three. The last installment tells the tale of Vanyel Ashkevron and his journey towards becoming a Herald Mage and legend. Magic’s Price focuses on Vanyel’s plight to defeat a dark mage who is trying to overthrow the Kingdom of Valdemar. Vanyel begins the Last Herald Mage trilogy as a brat and a coward (making the first book a bit difficult to get through), but becomes a true hero and thus a very likeable character by the third book. If you enjoy fantasy literature and novels that demonstrate strong character development, I would highly recommend this book.

How about mysteries? Reference & Instruction Librarian Sue Ann Brainard recommends The Devotion of Suspect X by Keigo Higashino (translated from the Japanese by Alexander O. Smith):

suspect xThe third book in the Detective Galileo series, this novel begins with an attempted extortion and death of the extorter in his ex-wife’s apartment under mysterious circumstances. The woman’s neighbor, a mathematics teacher named Ishigami, offers to help dispose of the body. When the body turns up and is identified, Detective Kusanagi gets the case and the ex-wife becomes the prime suspect. The detective, suspicious but unable to find any evidence of the woman’s guilt, calls in his friend,  Dr. Manabu Yukawa, a physicist and frequent partner in crime solving. Coincidentally, “Professor Galileo”, as he is commonly known, attended college with the mathematics teacher, Ishigami, and suspects the man had something to do with the  murder. What ensues is a high stakes, cat and mouse game, as Ishigami tries to protect his neighbor and Professor Galileo tries to out think the suspect and prove his guilt.
Maybe you’re more of a contemporary fiction fan?  Then Kate Pitcher suggests the recent novel, Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore, by Robin Sloan:
penumbraClay Jannon is a laid-off web designer and technology worker.  Living in San Francisco, Clay needs to find a job and wanders into a dusty, ancient-looking used bookstore one night, literally called “Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore” as it is indeed open 24 hours a day.  Hired as the night-time bookstore clerk, Clay has questions about the mysterious activities and strange visitors to the bookstore.  People visit the bookstore in the middle of night, never buying anything, but borrowing books from the depths of the bookstore and returning them once they have been read.  Paying customers might only be passers-by who wander in out of curiosity and this is how Clay meets Kat Potente, a Google programmer.  Clay is a curious, ambitious man and his technology skills play a major role in uncovering the true purpose behind the origins of the bookstore and its reason for being.  The novel is a true blend of “book love”, a sort of ode to the book as object, but also as a novel about the possibilities and limitations of our obsession with social media, technology and data.  Clay, Kat and a cast of several other quirky characters discover a mysterious organization called the Unbroken Spine and race across the country and through cyberspace to solve the mystery of the bookstore.  The New York Times‘ review states that the novel “…dexterously tackles the intersection between old technologies and new with a novel that is part love letter to books, part technological meditation, part thrilling adventure, part requiem.”
Have you read any good books lately? Are you willing to share a review? Let us know – submit your review to Kate Pitcher at [email protected] for next month’s post.

Online Emerging Technologies for Creating Multimedia Content

OnlineEmergingThe interactive tools available on the web are becoming just as popular as many of the computer software applications installed on our computers. We find ourselves more and more using the web to design and create various forms of content. This workshop will look at and demonstrate some of those tools that can help you deliver your content more effectively. Examples include: Prezi, Animoto, bubbl.us, Jing, Wordle, Poll Everywhere and more. Bring your notebook computers to see for yourself.

Wednesday, February 6, 2:30 – 3:30 pm | Milne 104

Prevent Plagiarism Workshops Spring 2013

Plagiarism.FlickrUserGiulia.Forsythe

The next workshop offered is Thursday, January 31, 7:00-7:50 pm (Milne 109)

Milne Library is again offering a series of workshops to educate students on what constitutes plagiarism and strategies to combat it.

Students plagiarize for many reasons. While some are simply trying to get through a course as easily as possible, still others procrastinate and panic, taking a few short cuts to get the assignment done. Some students think that text on a “group-developed” web page like Wikipedia does not have to be cited because it is “common knowledge” (not true!).  Others genuinely do not understand how to paraphrase, quote, and cite properly.

In this workshop taught by librarians, students will:

  1. discuss how copyright laws and plagiarism rules apply to using material from the web.
  2. learn how citing correctly can help avoid unintentional plagiarism.
  3. learn how to write a paragraph that successfully and clearly distinguishes paraphrases and quotes from original ideas and language.

There is no pre-registration. Students can just come to the listed classroom at the assigned time.

The remaining Spring 2013 workshops are:

  • Wednesday, February 6, 4:30-5:20 pm (Milne 104)
  • Friday, February 8, 3:30-4:20 pm (Milne 105)
  • Monday, February 18, 4:30-5:20 pm (Milne 109)
  • Friday, March 1, 2:30-3:20 pm (Milne 109)
  • Tuesday, March 5, 6:00-6:50 pm (Milne 105)
  • Wednesday, March 13, 5:00-5:50 pm (Milne 104)
  • Thursday, April 4, 4:30-5:20 pm (Milne 104)
  • Monday, April 8, 2:30-3:20 pm (Milne 109)
  • Wednesday, April 10, 4:30-5:20 pm (Milne 104)
  • Friday, April 19, 3:30-4:20 pm (Milne 105)

J.R.R. Tolkien and The Hobbit

the-hobbit-first-ed
First edition of The Hobbit

In the mid-1930s, a British professor was marking exams when he found that a student had left a blank page in his examination book. A sentence popped into his mind & he scrawled it on the empty sheet: “In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.” The professor was John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, and thus was born The Hobbit.

The Hobbit was only the first published work to be set in Middle-earth; it was followed in 1954–55 by The Lord of the Rings. After Tolkien’s death in 1973 his youngest son, Christopher, took on the role of editor of his father’s unpublished texts. The Silmarillion, with the help of a young Canadian lawyer who later became a renowned fantasy author in his own right (Guy Gavriel Kay), was published in 1977. Other books have followed over the last 25 years, including the 12-volume series History of Middle-earth, which shows the evolution of Tolkien’s books over the course of decades. While The Hobbit was the first published work, Tolkien had been working on what he called his “Middle-earth legendarium” since 1917, while invalided home from the front in World War I.

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Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings cycle

Reams of text have been written about Tolkien & Middle-earth, from annotated versions of the books to analysis of the themes to in-depth character explorations of both major & minor characters. Milne Library has a number of books in these categories.

In the nearly 70 years since the publication of The Hobbit in 1937, millions of people worldwide have been enthralled with Tolkien’s creation of an entire world, complete with a variety of distinct peoples, languages, & its own mythology. I became one of them when I first read The Lord of the Rings as a teen…although I actually almost never read the books at all. My younger brother & I had both been given boxed sets of The Hobbit & The Lord of the Rings as Christmas gifts, & he immediately read & loved his. As the superior older sister, I loftily looked down my nose at his enthusiasm. It wasn’t until the following October, when there was nothing else to read at home & I was completely bored, that I decided to fill my time with a little bit of the books. Well…I read nonstop for the next few days, & as soon as I finished devouring the books I immediately went back to the beginning & read them again. My brother still likes to remind me what a “Fool of a Took!” I was.

WitchKing
[Left] Witch-King from Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings films, [Right] Librarian Sherry Rhodes stands in New Zealand with Chris Cavallero, who portrayed the Witch-King
Over the last 30+ years I’ve collected a fair amount of Tolkienana (most of which is in the glass display cases in the lobby of Milne). And in 2006, I had the incredibly good fortune to go to “Middle-earth”—aka New Zealand—& visit many of the filming sites & meet many people associated with the making of Peter Jackson’s movies. I can say I’ve met the Witch-King! Our tour guide for a week was Ian McKellen’s (Gandalf) body double—but unlike McKellen, Derek Carver has a real wizard-like beard. We also spent a morning with Daniel Reeve, the calligrapher & mapmaker for all of the movies (as well as the Narnia films & Jackson’s King Kong, among others), who

Gandalf
[Left] Librarian Sherry Rhodes’ daughter, Kit, catches a ride as Pippin on the back of Derek Carver as an orc re-enacting the scene of Merry & Pippin’s abduction in New Zealand [Right] Gandalf body doubles with Sir Ian McKellan
gave each of us a piece of his calligraphy artwork (see the Milne display case!). For a Middle-earth geek like me, it was the trip of a lifetime. Someday, though, I’d love to go back to Middle-earth, & say the line that ends The Lord of the Rings: “Well, I’m back.”

Do you have a story about how you discovered The Lord of the Rings or The Hobbit? We’d love to hear it! And for a little fun… try the Elvish and Hobbit name generators!

Written by Sherry Rhodes, Reference/Instruction Librarian ([email protected])

Ruby Workshop: Critical Inquiry in Research

Great leaders gather information and critically analyze the facts before making good decisions. Attendees at this workshop will discover helpful tips and strategies that are used in any kind of database to help improve their searches, save time and determine the best quality resources for their research.

Tuesday, February 5, 2013
1:30 – 2:30 pm | Milne 104

*Required Ruby Workshop

Milne’s Growing! New Books, CDs, DVDs: Acquired & Donated

DonateToMilne
Donate Your Books, CD’s DVD’s to Milne!

Milne Library is growing!

We’re pleased that – with your help and support – we added over 2,515 new titles last year:

  • 303 DVDs
  • 154 CDs

 

New materials are generally selected from two sources:

  • Items we purchase fromrecommendations received by faculty, students, and staff. To make a recommendation, simply place an IDS request and select “Recommend Purchase.”
  • Items donated. We appreciate donations of materials by faculty, staff, students, and community members—you can drop them into our book donation dropbox by the entrance. Last year, we received 4,505 titles via donations, of which 586 titles (books and DVDs) stayed here in Milne. We sent the remaining items to Better World Books and any proceeds raised go to buying more books and other items for Milne.

We also supplement our 500,000 books upstairs with over 3,000,000 free ebooks available from Hathi Trust, Google Books, and Internet Archive.

donatebox
Book donation box, Milne Lobby entrance

An area of growing concern for us has been the increasing cost of textbooks (see our recent story on SUNY Open Textbooks). This year, Milne purchased several textbooks using money earned from Better World Books. By placing these critical texts on reserve, we hope to lessen the financial burden on students and their parents during the college years and after graduation.

Please consider donating books, CDs, DVDs, and other items in good condition to Milne. You can help build a strong collection that has a positive impact on the learning and research experiences of Geneseo students. These donations also benefit many others, including faculty and staff, the Geneseo and Livingston County communities, and communities across the globe via interlibrary loan.

If you’re interested in donating to Milne, please see the details at http://go.geneseo.edu/donate2Milne. And if you’re interested in what new resources we’ve added to Milne, please see http://go.geneseo.edu/newbooks.

If you have any questions or suggestions, please let me know. We give you sincere thanks for your support—we are able to do so much more because of the generosity of our supporters!

Cyril  Oberlander
Library Director
Tel: 585-245-5528
Email: [email protected]

Preventing Plagiarism Workshops: Spring 2013

Plagiarism.FlickrUserGiulia.Forsythe
Credit: FlickrUser Giulia.Forsythe
CC license: Attribution, Non-commercial, Share-Alike

Milne Library is again offering a series of workshops to educate students on what constitutes plagiarism and strategies to combat it.

Students plagiarize for many reasons. While some are simply trying to get through a course as easily as possible, still others procrastinate and panic, taking a few short cuts to get the assignment done. Some students think that text on a “group-developed” web page like Wikipedia does not have to be cited because it is “common knowledge” (not true!).  Others genuinely do not understand how to paraphrase, quote, and cite properly.

In this workshop taught by librarians, students will:

  1. discuss how copyright laws and plagiarism rules apply to using material from the web.
  2. learn how citing correctly can help avoid unintentional plagiarism.
  3. learn how to write a paragraph that successfully and clearly distinguishes paraphrases and quotes from original ideas and language.

There is no pre-registration. Students can just come to the listed classroom at the assigned time.

The remaining Spring 2013 workshops are:

  • Tuesday, January 29, 3:30-4:20 pm (Milne 121)
  • Thursday, January 31, 7:00-7:50 pm (Milne 109)
  • Wednesday, February 6, 4:30-5:20 pm (Milne 104)
  • Friday, February 8, 3:30-4:20 pm (Milne 105)
  • Monday, February 18, 4:30-5:20 pm (Milne 109)
  • Friday, March 1, 2:30-3:20 pm (Milne 109)
  • Tuesday, March 5, 6:00-6:50 pm (Milne 105)
  • Wednesday, March 13, 5:00-5:50 pm (Milne 104)
  • Thursday, April 4, 4:30-5:20 pm (Milne 104)
  • Monday, April 8, 2:30-3:20 pm (Milne 109)
  • Wednesday, April 10, 4:30-5:20 pm (Milne 104)
  • Friday, April 19, 3:30-4:20 pm (Milne 105)

Textbooks and Reserves at Milne

Milne library has a growing collection of required course texts for many of the courses taught on campus. Most are available for 4 hour loan at the Service Desk.

For an in-depth explanation of all that is available, check out our Find Textbooks and Course Reserves Guide.  With many options of how to access required materials for students’ different courses, the process may be confusing. This guide will help students find material for their coursework.

If Milne doesn’t have the text or course reading that you need on reserve at the Service Desk, you may be able to find it in the general collection.  Here are a few ways to find out:

  1. Search for the title in GLOCAT+ to see if we have it in the library’s general collection.
  2. Search for the title of your textbook on our How Do I Find My Course Texts library guide to see if we have it on 4 hour reserve at the Service Desk.
  3. Search for it in IDS Search to see if we can borrow it for you from another library.