Geoscience rock collections go online with Omeka

The Geneseo Geosciences Collections website

Earlier this month, senior Geological Sciences major Amanda Lanik presented her work creating a digital catalog at the Geological Society of America annual meeting in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Amanda used the free open source digital content platform Omeka to create an online catalog of the rock samples used to teach petrology, the study of the origin and composition of rocks. The Omeka platform is quite versatile and has been used for many digital library projects around the world.

Working with geological sciences faculty and Milne Library staff, Amanda designed the site template, added rock data and uploaded pictures of the samples.

In her GSA presentation, Amanda described how the new catalog can be searched by rock name, time period or description.  Users can also browse individual rock suites and can find samples from particular locations by selecting locations on a map.

In the future, this online collection can be used by teachers and students to create custom collections of materials and make direct connections between rocks in the Geneseo collection and the geoscience literature.

The Geneseo Geosciences Collections website
The Geneseo Geosciences Collections website

The growing online collection can be viewed at the Geneseo Geosciences Collections site. The abstract of Amanda’s presentation, as well as additional links can also be found online.

Dr. Dori Farthing (Geological Sciences) and Bonnie Swoger (Milne Library) served as advisors on the project, with technical assistance from Milne Library’s Corey Ha and Joe Easterly.

Research Help @Milne

Librarian Sherry Rhodes, helping out a student in our new Research Consultation space in the Center for Academic Excellence

Are you taking advantage of one of Milne Library’s best kept secrets?  The Reference (or Research) Librarians at SUNY Geneseo frequently hear from their professorial partners, as well as campus tour guides, that we are a gem to be discovered and utilized heavily.  They compare (and praise) our level of service to that of past experiences they have had at other (many times, distinguished) universities.  But don’t take your professors’ word for it!   See just what your classmates and peers have to say.

Sparked by Fall 2011 observations of students in need of research help at the Service Desk and Reference Desk, Anna Wilson, a recently graduated Spanish major with a minor in Latin American Studies, interviewed and filmed fellow students regarding their awareness and experience with Milne Library’s Research Librarians.  In anticipation of her participant observation study, she wrote,”I predict that many of the students in the library are as in the dark about what goes on at the reference desk as I was until this (Fall 2011) semester.”

Does this statement represent your awareness about who the Reference Librarians are and what we can help you with?  If so, be sure to watch Anna’s video and then come see us when you are in need of research help!

Librarian Kim Hoffman works on searching with a student.

Reference Librarians are on duty for nearly all hours that the library is open with official desk duty in the Center for Academic Excellence from 10 am – 5 pm (Mon-Thurs), 10 am – 2 pm (Fri) and 10 am – 2 pm (Sat) and on-call reference assistance as early as 8 am and as late as 1 am.  Just ask for help at the Service Desk and a librarian will be around to help.

Additionally, our very popular Research Consultation service (as well as our Technology Consultation service) offers students the opportunity to make one-on-one appointments with a specialist when the time is convenient for you or you and your group.  Both services offer a dedicated time slot to focus solely on your research project needs, without having to compete with other students’ questions.

As the due dates for your research projects approach and the semester gets busier and busier, see what assistance (and time savings) a Reference Librarian can offer you!

Faculty Bookshelf: An Interview with Meg Stolee

Professor Meg Stolee and Gaudy Night by Dorothy Sayers

The line between pleasure reading and research interests is blurred when it comes to Professor Meg Stolee from the History Department: prison camp memoirs top her list of favorite genre for pleasure reading!  An avid reader of memoirs by women, mysteries, and biography, Professor Stolee typically reads between 5 and 7 books a week, a fact her students find astonishing.

While current research interests surround the book Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin by Timothy Snyder, and The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million by Daniel Mendelsohn, currently on her nightstand is The Cloud Atlas by Liam Callanan (not the book Cloud Atlas that was recently made into a film!). She’s also reading Kiev, 1941 by David Stahel, which offers a new assessment of Hitler’s Barbarossa campaign in the USSR.

Professor Stolee’s favorite books about women include the elegant and poignant book Hope Against Hope by Nadezhda Mandel’shtam, whose husband was a prisoner under Stalin. She also favors Where She Came From by Helen Epstein, and Under a Cruel Star by Heda Margolius Kovaly.

When asked what book changed her life, Professor Stolee mentions a Dorothy L. Sayers mystery called Gaudy Night, read while she was a student at Bryn Mawr College. The book explores women and higher education, women’s full acceptance in male-dominated academic life, and the tensions that arise when women try to balance love and marriage with careers in academia. It gave the undergraduate a lot to think about while attending lectures and writing papers. Students who think they don’t have time for “light” reading while in college take heed: Like Meg Stolee, your life might be influenced the most by a book not listed on a syllabus!

Holiday Story-time Celebration!

On Friday, November 30th, Milne Library will host a Holiday Story-time Celebration for children and their caregivers! This event is sponsored by the Young Children’s Council and students from the School of Education. Any age is welcome, though these holiday themed stories are geared toward the under-10 age group (appropriate for preschoolers).

Story-time (performed by members of the Young Children’s Council) will last from 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm, with refreshments, songs and crafts. The event will take place in the Teacher Education Resource Center, located on the lower-level of Milne Library/SUNY Geneseo.

For more information or to RSVP (not required) see the flyer (feel free to post or share) — or send an email to Deven Coulter – [email protected], or Michelle Costello – [email protected]

 

 

Upcoming Plagiarism Workshop Tues., Nov. 27

A plagiarism workshop will be held in the library on Tuesday, November 27, 4:30-5:30 pm in Milne 105.

Students plagiarize for many reasons. While some are simply trying to get through a course as easily as possible, others procrastinate and panic, taking a few short cuts to get the assignment done. Some students think that text on a “group-developed” web page like Wikipedia does not have to be cited because it is “common knowledge” (not true!).  Others genuinely do not understand how to paraphrase, quote, and cite properly.

In this workshop taught by librarians, students will:

  1. discuss how copyright laws and plagiarism rules apply to using material from the web.
  2. learn how citing correctly can help avoid unintentional plagiarism.
  3. learn how to write a paragraph that successfully and clearly distinguishes paraphrases and quotes from original ideas and language.

There is no pre-registration. Students can just come to the listed classroom at the time above.

Library Hours for Thanksgiving Break

Happy Thanksgiving

We here at Milne Library wish you a safe and happy journey home for the Thanksgiving holiday. If your plans include a little studying or research, the library will have reduced hours over the Thanksgiving Break:

Wednesday, November 21 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Thurs. – Sat., November 22-24 CLOSED
Sunday, November 25 6:00 PM – 1:00 AM

Geneseo Authors Honored at Recognition Event in Milne

Milne Library will host its annual Geneseo Authors Celebration on Thursday, Nov. 15, from 5-6 p.m., at which many faculty and staff will be recognized for the work they’ve published during the past year.  And what a busy year it was for our authors, who collectively produced dozens of journal articles, book chapters, encyclopedia entries, monographs and more.

The authors represent many departments on campus and a wide variety of fields, and the following list includes just a sampling. Distinguished Teaching Professor of English Gene Stelzig continues to work in the area of Romantic autobiography, with special interest in the manuscript journals and diaries of Henry Crabb Robinson at Dr. Williams’s Library in London. Professor and Director of Writing Rachel Hall, also in the English Dept., has written a short story set in 1972 that examines family relationships against the larger political landscape of the time.

Over in Geological Sciences, Distinguished Service Professor Richard Young has been continuing his work on the geologic history of the Southwest (maybe you’ve seen him on the History Channel’s Grand Canyon documentary!).  And recent research done by Distinguished Teaching Professor David Geiger (Chemistry Dept.) and colleagues involves the synthesis and structural studies of novel di-substituted benzimidazole derivatives bearing appendages that have the ability to interact with metal ions.  Benzimidazoles, he explains, are a class of compounds with many pharmacological uses, such as anti-psychotics, anti-ulcer, anthelmintic, and antifungal agents.  By varying the substitution pattern on the benzimidazole, the pharmacological activity can be modulated.

 

Patrick Rault, assistant professor of mathematics, has lately been doing research that gives new structural information about the number of points with integer coordinates lying inside of two hyperbolas, and for points with rational coordinates on plane curves. He collaborated on some aspects of this research with student Wilson Cheung, who won an award for his presentation of these findings at Mathfest, the annual meeting of the Mathematics Association of America, last August.

 

History Professor Emilye Crosby continues her research of the civil rights movement and race relations in Mississippi and has recently published an article exploring the history of school desegregation in Claiborne County, alongside analysis of oral histories, memory, and competing local and national narratives about school integration. Atsushi Tajima, assistant professor of communication, has published separate articles detailing his findings concerning celebrity mothers’ weight-loss narratives in People magazine, as well as Japanese imaginings of Blacks and race in popular media. And Distinguished Teaching Faculty Emerita Margaret Matlin has seen two of her textbooks,  Cognition and The Psychology of Women, published in new editions.

 

 

In the School of Education, Assistant Professor of Reading Maria “Perpie” Liwanag’s research has led her to collaborate with Milne’s Steve Dresbach on how preservice teachers use knowledge of eye movement miscue analysis to design book trailers, and with Steve and Librarian Michelle Costello on the effects of collaborating to provide preservice teachers ways to integrate technology in literacy instruction. Also this year, she co-authored an article with a student describing how foreign languages can be taught to elementary students using a comprehensible input framework.

 

Provost Carol Long is expected to be on hand at Thursday’s event to recognize these and all of this year’s faculty and staff authors. Please join us in the Special Collections area on the Lower Level of Milne to celebrate the excellent work being done here at Geneseo! And if you’d like, check out our Facebook Event and let us know you’re coming!

 

Your Rights as a User and Creator Workshop

Can you be sued for using an image you found online? Is writing fan fiction legal? When you get inspired by something you read online and create something new from it, do you own it? After discussing scenarios, attendees will appreciate the fine line between fair use and copyright infringement, and will recognize the difference between student and professional behavior.

Wednesday, November 14 @ 2:30-3:30  | Milne 104

*Required Ruby Workshop

Understanding Citations: The Tutorial

Citation Tutorial

Keyword searching via Google or one of Milne Library’s many databases is probably the first and most heavily used method in an undergrad student’s research toolkit.  Are you finding the right mix of terms and search tools to locate the most appropriate sources?  Do you spend hours at a computer trying to identify and connect “like-minded” articles?

A primary method in a scholar’s research toolkit is to track down citations within a relevant source’s bibliography.  It stands to reason that the research a scholar used to inform his/her work would be related to that author’s initial topic and can thus be found in the comprehensive works cited list.  In other words, find one perfect article and its bibliography will lead you to many more related sources.

The trick, however, is to know how to read a citation, no matter what writing style it’s in – APA, MLA, Turabian, NLM – to know what type of source you’re dealing with (e.g. journal or newspaper article, book, book chapter, legal case) in order to then locate and get your hands on that source.

If you are confused by the various structures of the myriad citation writing styles, check out this self-paced tutorial for a complete lesson (including interactive exercises) on reading different citations.

After this lesson, you should be reading citations and locating the necessary material like a pro!

Upcoming Plagiarism Workshop Tues., Nov. 13

A plagiarism workshop will be held in the library on Tuesday, November 13, 7:00-8:00 pm in Milne 105.

Students plagiarize for many reasons. While some are simply trying to get through a course as easily as possible, others procrastinate and panic, taking a few short cuts to get the assignment done. Some students think that text on a “group-developed” web page like Wikipedia does not have to be cited because it is “common knowledge” (not true!).  Others genuinely do not understand how to paraphrase, quote, and cite properly.

In this workshop taught by librarians, students will:

  1. discuss how copyright laws and plagiarism rules apply to using material from the web.
  2. learn how citing correctly can help avoid unintentional plagiarism.
  3. learn how to write a paragraph that successfully and clearly distinguishes paraphrases and quotes from original ideas and language.

There is no pre-registration. Students can just come to the listed classroom at the time above.