What is Digital Scholarship?

Map of the Internet 1/16/2005, from www.opte.org

Digital Scholarship is (among other things) scholarly activities such as writing, research, and communications that take advantage of technologies in the digital world. While digital scholarship might be found everywhere from Twitter to Tumblr to WordPress, it frequently centers around the development of scholarly works, and the software platforms which support them. For example, the TAPAS Project is creating a place where scholars can create and edit texts encoded in TEI XML, and publish them in the same space. Editing Modernism in Canada has a similar purpose, but devoted to modern Canadian authors. In the physical and applied sciences, arXiv.org is an indispensable resource for discovering and reading the works of other scholars. The social web has tailored some of its resources to scholarly communications as well, creating a plethora of platforms that fuse bibliographic reference management with social networking — such as Mendeley, Zotero, Connotea, and Papers.

Here at SUNY Geneseo, the faculty and librarians at Milne are working on a number of digital scholarship projects. For example, Digital Thoreau is a digital scholarship project which is creating a web-based scholarly edition of Walden where users can create and view scholarly commentary inline with the text. SUNY Geneseo Journal Publishing is our peer-reviewed open access journal publishing service which uses the Public Knowledge Project‘s Open Journal Systems. You can read the contents of GREAT Day there, and Educational Change, which is a peer-reviewed journal published by the New York State Foundations of Education Association.

If you’d like to learn more about what we’re doing, or if you have a project to propose, please get  in touch with Joe Easterly, Milne’s Electronic Resources & Digital Scholarship Librarian at [email protected]

Upcoming Plagiarism Workshop Thurs., Nov. 1

A plagiarism workshop will be held in the library on Thursday, November 1, 6:00-7:00 pm in Milne 105.

Students plagiarize for many reasons. While some are simply trying to get through a course as easily as possible, others procrastinate and panic, taking a few short cuts to get the assignment done. Some students think that text on a “group-developed” web page like Wikipedia does not have to be cited because it is “common knowledge” (not true!).  Others genuinely do not understand how to paraphrase, quote, and cite properly.

In this workshop taught by librarians, students will:

  1. discuss how copyright laws and plagiarism rules apply to using material from the web.
  2. learn how citing correctly can help avoid unintentional plagiarism.
  3. learn how to write a paragraph that successfully and clearly distinguishes paraphrases and quotes from original ideas and language.

There is no pre-registration. Students can just come to the listed classroom at the time above.

Ryann Fair: Profiles of Milne Library Staff

Business Manager Ryann Fair

If there’s one person in Milne that you need to know, it’s Ryann Fair.  She’s the Library’s new  business manager, and she has her finger on the pulse of library operations.  If you’ve attended a recent event hosted by Milne, chances are that Ryann coordinated it.  Summer building renovations?  Ryann works with the office staff in managing those. But most of what she does happens behind the scenes, like donor and alumni relations, overseeing the Library’s budget, acting as Milne’s hiring manager, and serving on diverse Library teams including the Assessment, Marketing, and Travel Teams.

Having the opportunity to work with every department and staff member is the thing Ryann likes best about her job.  “The staff is fantastic. The initiatives the Library is undertaking are fun and exciting, and I get to help out with them.”

Before joining the staff last April, Ryann was the administrative specialist at Nazareth College’s Lorette Wilmot Library, a job she loved.  She made the move to Milne, she says, because it offered the chance to do much of the same sort of work but also to do more — and more challenging — things.  Ryann holds a B.A. in psychology from Houghton College, an M.A. in liberal studies from Nazareth, and is working toward an M.S. in management from Nazareth.

Outside work, Ryann has an active social life and gets together with friends once — and sometimes twice — each weekend.  Her best vacations, she says, were trips to Cape Cod, renting a house with three other couples.  She hopes to take a tour of European cities someday.

Among her quieter pursuits are making jewelery and ceramics (she has a minor in fine arts), reading (Kristin Hanna is one of her favorite authors), movies (her tastes tend toward sci-fi), cooking (learned from her Sicilian grandmother), and running.

Ryann’s office is in Milne 214, and she be contacted at [email protected] or 245-5598.

Upcoming Plagiarism Workshop Tues., Oct. 30

A plagiarism workshop will be held in the library on Tuesday, October 30, 4:30-5:30 pm in Milne 105.

Students plagiarize for many reasons. While some are simply trying to get through a course as easily as possible, others procrastinate and panic, taking a few short cuts to get the assignment done. Some students think that text on a “group-developed” web page like Wikipedia does not have to be cited because it is “common knowledge” (not true!).  Others genuinely do not understand how to paraphrase, quote, and cite properly.

In this workshop taught by librarians, students will:

  1. discuss how copyright laws and plagiarism rules apply to using material from the web.
  2. learn how citing correctly can help avoid unintentional plagiarism.
  3. learn how to write a paragraph that successfully and clearly distinguishes paraphrases and quotes from original ideas and language.

There is no pre-registration. Students can just come to the listed classroom at the time above.

Ebooks on demand!

Starting this fall, Milne Library is pleased to offer ebooks on demand from EBL, a vendor specializing in scholarly and popular books. The current collection has access to over 5,000 titles, with majority of content published between 2011 and 2012.  Publishers include:  Ashgate Publishing, Blackwell, John Wiley & Sons, Princeton University Press, McFarland & Company and several others.

To access ebook titles, students, faculty and staff need only search GLOCAT+ for subject of their choice, then limit by Show content type to “Book/eBook”.

 

Once you have a list of results you will see a link for Full Text Online.  Click.

 

 

 
The link will take you to a drop-down menu where you will select SUNY Geneseo from the list of selected institutions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the next screen you will see information about the book title you selected; click Read Online and your table of contents for the book will appear.

 

 

 

As with print books, a loan is required before access to an ebook can be made available for an extended period of time.

Borrowing a book will activate full text access for the length of the loan (in most cases 1 day or 7 days) and enable you to copy and print from the books.

Note: To continue accessing the ebook once a loan has expired, simply create or request another loan as you did your initial loan.

 

If you want to download a title to your e-reader or computer, click on the Download tab on the lefthand menu; you will need to have Adobe Digital Editions installed for downloading content.

 

Read and enjoy!
Please contact Kate Pitcher, Collection Development Librarian, if you have any questions or comments about the ebook collection.

 

Faculty Bookshelf: Interview with Cheryl Kreutter

A continuing series of interviews with SUNY Geneseo faculty on their reading interests; today’s “Faculty Bookshelf” delves into the pursuits of School of Education professor, Cheryl Kreutter.

What are your current research Interests?
My current research interests focus on literacy teacher education, critical literacy, and international children’s & young adult literature.  I wonder how reading and reflecting on literature through a critical literacy lens might impact teachers’ use of international text. I’m also curious about how the Common Core State Standards will influence teacher choice of literature and pedagogy in English Language Arts classrooms.


What is your favorite literary genre to read for pleasure?

Action and adventure, particularly those involving aviation.

What book is on your nightstand now?
Now We Read, We See, We Speak: Portrait of Literacy Development in an Adult Freierian-Based Class by Victoria Purcell-Gates and Robin A. Waterman

Tell us about a book that changed your life.
A book that has highly influenced my professional thinking is Pedagogy of the Oppressed by Paulo Freire.  Freire believed that the true purpose of literacy education is to liberate people to become fully human.  Teachers and students must engage in dynamic, mutual exchanges to read critically both the world and the word, in order to deconstruct the layers of socio-political meanings of words and reconstruct meanings that contribute toward the transformation of an unjust society. I purposefully incorporate dialogue and critique throughout my courses to emphasize personal and social transformation attained through literacy.

Name a book you just couldn’t finish.
The Ask and the Answer: Chaos Walking: Book Two by Patrick Ness.  (sequel to Knife of Never Letting Go.)

What were your favorite books as a child?
Mysteries.  (Although, I should say Mark Twain because I grew up in Elmira, NY).

If you could meet any writer, dead or alive, who would it be?  What would you want to know?
I would like to (re)meet Louise Rosenblatt.  I attended a presentation where she, at age 98, stood up, shook her fist, and reprimanded the audience of educators for not making our voices heard to policy makers, and I, no doubt, would benefit from her insights about current education policy. I’d also like her recommendations for ways that I can help my students understand how and why she preferred her transaction theory of reading not to be confused with reader response theory.

Do you have a favorite book?  What is it and why is it your favorite?
My favorite book is To Kill a Mockingbird. I make it a point to reread it every year or so.

Do you want to learn more about the reading habits of a Geneseo Faculty member? Let us know by emailing Tracy Paradis at [email protected]

Milne welcomes twins!

 Milne’s family just grew a little bit bigger! Business and Data Librarian, Justina Elmore and her wife Nickole are proud to welcome their twin girls, Piper Grace and Morgan Elizabeth. Piper was born at 7:38 pm on Thursday October 17, 2012, weighing 7lbs, 10 oz. and measuring 19 1/4 inches long. Morgan was born at 7:39 pm, weighing 7lbs, 9oz. and measuring 19 1/2 inches long.

Connecting the Dots: Open Access and Open Educational Resources

Join Milne Library in our celebration of International Open Access Week, October 22-26, 2012!

Cable Green of Creative Commons and Nicole Allen at Student PIRGs gave an Open Educational Resources (OER) the once-over, diving into the basics of OERs, the relevance of OERs to the library community and the intersections of OER and Open Access.

October 25, 2012
4:00 PM
Milne 208

Open Access Week is now in its sixth year, and offers an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access. Our goal is to inspire wider participation in making Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research, so come to connect and discuss the Open Access (OA) movement and its impact on teaching, scholarship and research.

Critical Inquiry in Research Workshop

Great leaders gather information and critically analyze the facts before making good decisions. Attendees at this workshop will discover helpful tips and strategies that are used in any kind of database to help improve their searches, save time and determine the best quality resources for their research.

Thursday, October 25, 2012
2:30 – 3:30 pm | Milne 121

*Required Ruby Workshop