Cancelled: Celebrating Geneseo Authors Event

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The Celebrating Geneseo Authors event that was to take place at 4:00 today has been postponed due to inclement weather.
Stay tuned for information on the new date and time.

“A Camera in 1888″ Exhibit Opening Tuesday, Nov. 4, 6-7 p.m. in Milne Library

Please join us at the opening of an exhibit featuring the remarkable, often beautiful and historically important photographs of Martha Blow Wadsworth (1864-1934) from Milne Library’s Special Collections.  The event will take place in Milne Library on Tuesday, Nov. 4, from 6-7 p.m., and light refreshments will be served.

camera1888“A Camera in 1888: Martha Blow Wadsworth, Chronicler of American Moments” highlights photographs taken during her travels to Alaska with an Army surveying party, to Panama while the canal was being built, and to the American west and southwest (again with an Army surveying party ) — all in the early 20th-century. Through the talented eye of one local amateur, the exhibit illustrates what the consumer camera, introduced in 1888 by Kodak, made possible. It will be on view through December in the lobby of Milne Library.

Ms. Wadsworth was a native of St. Louis who lived  in Avon, N.Y. with her husband, Herbert Wadsworth (of the prominent Geneseo family).  An avid horsewoman and amateur photographer, she has been described as vivacious, energetic, and adventurous. Thirty-three of her albums, as well as hundreds of glass slides, from which the photographs have been selected were donated to Milne Library in 1976 by nephew-in-law Michael Moukhanoff and are housed with the larger Wadsworth Family Papers collection.

“A Camera in 1888″ was curated by Special Collections Librarian Liz Argentieri and Regina Carra ’15, with assistance from Jack Scott ’06. It is part of the larger campus-wide program, 1888 in America: William Trost Richards’ Seascape Contextualized, which opened Oct. 24 and runs through the end of the semester.

Fall Back! Set Your Clocks Back on Sunday Nov. 2

Daylight Saving Time Ends on Sunday, Nov. 2nd and our clocks will need to be set back 1 hour.  Some of the clocks in the library are controlled by an electronic master clock and will reset automatically, but many are not.  We appreciate your patience as we work to update them!

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What is Daylight Savings Anyway?
Daylight-savings time is the advancing of the clock, usually in summer time, one hour ahead of the local standard time in order to increase the hours of daylight available at the end of the day.

The idea originated with none other than Benjamin Franklin in the 1700s.  But it didn’t really catch on until WWI when England and Germany put it into practice as a wartime measure for making full use of daylight hours.  By 1925, it became permanent in England.

The U.S. also took advantage of daylight savings for both World Wars, but it didn’t become a permanent fixture for most states until the oil crisis in the mid-1960’s.

Find out more at timeanddate.com.

Pillows/Matresses Raise Awareness of Sexual Assault on Campus

CarryThatWeightTogetherYou may see pillows and/or mattresses carried around campus tomorrow [Wednesday, October 29, 2014]. Students, faculty and staff on college campuses across the country are taking collective action to support survivors of sexual and domestic violence on college campuses by carrying a pillow or mattress.

This national day of action is inspired by the activism and art of Emma Sulkowicz at Columbia University and led by Columbia student activists. Emma carries a mattress with her as part of a performance art piece to protest the dismissal of her rape report by campus officials at Columbia University.

The day of action aims to raise awareness about the prevalence of sexual and domestic violence, advocate for better campus policies, and challenge rape culture. To find out more and share photos of the efforts of students on our campus visit the Carry That Weight website.

Milne’s updates its Ask A Librarian page

Libanswers News Slider1Milne Library’s Ask A Librarian webpage just got a facelift! The new page is better integrated with our chat and library subject guides. Added functionality on this page allows users to search through Frequently Asked Questions, submit a question of their own or contact a reference librarian via phone, text, email, chat, or by scheduling a one-on-one consultation.

Be sure to update your bookmarks to libanswers.geneseo.edu.

Scholarly sources and reliable news sources about the Ebola outbreak

This post was originally published on the Scientific American Blog, Information Culture, on September 29, 2014.

While there has been some high quality news reporting about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, it is also easy to find vague, misleading or erroneous information about the disease and the outbreak. News related to the outbreak may also prompt more folks to explore the scholarly scientific literature on the subject.  The list below contains some reliable information sources on the topic.

The U.S. National Library of Medicine’s Disaster Information Management Research Center released an excellent guide to Ebola information resources. Many of the links in this post are also available from the NLM guide.

General information about the disease

News stories and collections

Scholarly materials

The National Library of Medicine has initiated an Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) for scholarly papers related to Ebola. The EAI is a partnership between the National Library of Medicine (the folks behind the PubMed biomedical research database) and the companies and organizations that publish scholarly articles. The EAI allows healthcare professionals, policy makes, librarians, and others involved in a health disaster event to temporarily access scholarly articles on the topic that would generally only be available to subscribers. Affected folks hoping to access the information need to login at the EAI site, then continue on to PubMed.  Once you get to PubMed, you can limit your search to articles available for free through the program. The current EAI allows access until October 17, 2014.

Many publishers have put together collections of ebola related articles available for free on their websites, including:

Of particular interest is an interactive map and timeline of the outbreak, discussed in detail by Larry Greenemeier on the Scientific American website.

 

The HealthMap of the Ebola outbreak

Governmental websites

This list is only a small portion of the high quality information sources available. Feel free to share your go-to high-quality information resources in the comments.

Leading the Way for Better Library Instruction

Three instructors, five team leaders, 37 participants, 5 regional locations in New York, and 963 miles travelled; this, the winning equation for a summertime road trip of the third Library Instruction Leadership Academy (LILAC).

NYSDr. Brian Morgan of the Ella Shear Cline School of Education joined librarians Michelle Costello and Kim Davies Hoffman, along with many other co-Principal Investigators on the IITG planning team, to design a LILAC like none before. After offering two local instances of the academy (2010 & 2013), meant to train librarians new to instructional roles in foundational pedagogical methods, LILAC 3 aims to widen the audience throughout New York State. The first stage included five full-day workshops (over a two-week period) in various regions of the state, in an attempt to reach as many participants as possible – Potsdam, Saratoga Springs, Highland, Rochester, and Ithaca. Dr. Morgan provided a thorough grounding in pedagogical theory and Michelle and Kim followed with demonstrations of that theory into the practice of library instruction. Students were immersed in the theory as they contemplated their professional content through hands-on and collaborative activities

Giving LILAC participants a three-week break to resume their typical fall semester routine, online modules for the academy picked up on Monday, September 15, beginning with a focus on librarian interactions with students and collaborations with faculty and community members. Three more two-week modules will be spread out until mid-November and participants will culminate their learning with multiple final projects (a progressively developed lesson plan, a usable digital asset that can be used to supplement a class lesson or used to promote library services, and an action plan for a project personalized to each participant’s library).

LILAC 3 is not only meant to educate its participants, but its developers too. Module presenters are experimenting with new technologies to translate the typical LILAC content into asynchronous learning. The regional leaders have been immersed in the LILAC experience since the time of IITG proposal writing, so that they might sustain in future years such professional development opportunities in their local regions.

Imagine This! Creative Space for SOE Students

The Imaginarium is a place of creativity. It is an open area that contains materials, ideas, and tools that can be used to enhance learning. School of Education students can use the space to meet for projects, use the material to create bulletin boards, complete assessment pieces, and use a variety of resources, models, and manipulates available in TERC to enhance lessons.

imaginarium-collageTeachers can send students to the Imaginarium as a resource of ideas for lesson plans, projects, and unit plans.

The area is also open to the community. We would love to encourage members to explore the fiction and nonfiction novels available for variety of grade levels. In addition, there are many games and resources available for students to practice skills.

Office hours are available on Tuesday and Thursday evening from 6-8pm. Please stop by and meet with the Imaginarium curator for help with your projects.

George Bernard Shaw once said, “Imagination is the beginning of creation. You imagine what you desire, you will what you imagine, and at last you create what you will.” So visit the Imaginarium and allow your imagination to flow.

Milne’s HUGE collection of DVDs now easier to browse and find

SpinnersForget Redbox and Netflix. Milne Library has an AMAZING selection of entertaining DVDs – more than 1,500 feature films and television series — chosen with you, the college student, in mind . What’s more, you don’t have to spend a cent and you’ll get four weeks to watch them. They’re a cinch to browse, too, now that they’re arranged alphabetically by title on new spinning display units on Milne’s Lower Level. No more call numbers to write down or try to remember, no more craning your next and straining your eyes to find that call number stuck on the narrow spine of the DVD case – just simple, straightforward, and more enjoyable DVD pickin’!

 

If you’re one of those who prefer to browse for movies and such in GLOCAT Classic first, the handy “DVDs & Videos” tab allows you to see not only what Milne has but what’s not currently checked out. Here a title search, or a keyword search on a particular actor, director, topic, etc., will bring up just DVDs and videos that match what you’re looking for. To find just the most recent releases, search by date range (e.g., “2014-2014”) and a list of that year’s releases will come up, arranged alphabetically by title.

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Users should know that, in addition to the feature films and television series they’ll find on the spinning units, Milne owns many other titles in DVD format (think PBS documentaries). These are still arranged by call number and housed on shelves opposite the “spinners.”

Liz Argentieri, Special Collections

The Internet is SO S – L – O – W…?!

CIT.iOSdownload2Our friends in CIT have issued the following notice:

iOS 8, the next update for Apple iPhones and iPads, is over 2GB in size. It’s huge. It will be released tomorrow, Wednesday, September 17. We have hundreds of these Apple devices on campus. If any significant number of them all attempt to download their update at the same time, we are going to suffer a genuine case of network over-utilization.

We are looking at deploying a caching server to minimize some of this pain, but, realistically, the network, the Internet, wireless, it’s all going to be slow and painful for the next few days. Please don’t be surprised when things don’t behave as usual and perform below their usual standard.

Thanks!