New Access to Experian’s Credit Data Reports

business_research-400x300Our ABI/INFORM database now has access to the Experian Commercial Risk Database, containing over 40 million credit data reports for both private and public companies, allowing researchers to see details such as contact information, size, industry, MSA, sales range, business type, bankruptcy information, credit risk, and more. These reports are full-text with coverage from December 10, 1980 to the present.

ABI/INFORM can be found under recommended databases on both the Business/Economics and Accounting/Auditing library research guides.

To find these reports, search ABI/INFORM for a company (e.g.“Ford Motor company”), then limit to reports (or limit further to just experian reports under publication title).

FindingExperianReports_ABI-INFORM

For more info on the new content, see the announcement on ProQuest’s blog.

Life in the Digital Woods: Walden, A Fluid Text Updated

[See our update post on the Digital Thoreau blog too!]

A Recap: What is Walden: A Fluid Text?

Screen Shot 2014-12-04 at 12.50.31 AMOur Fluid Text edition of Walden gathers eight years and seven versions of the American masterpiece using the Versioning Machine tool and Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) mark-up. Want the modern edit of the masterpiece?– we also have the 1971 Princeton University Press edition, reproduced with permission. Readers can see the definitive version foremost (with or without our notes, easily toggled off for a clean read), and then view the older workings of the novel. Easily presented side-by-side, readers can wade time’s river in order to view the evolution of Walden as Thoreau honed it over the years. We’ve encoded the textual changes down to the word based on the scholarship of Ron Clapper. A simple click on the text will highlight the cross-edition variations; all the grunt work has been done for the fascinated student of Thoreau, and now further opportunities for scholarship are available with this publicly available text. Coders, too, can step behind-the-screen to see our TEI mark-up and XSLT. The Fluid Text edition of Walden takes the confident and singular challenge Thoreau gave us long ago even further through the field of digital humanities, and studies of encoding and authorial evolution:

It is not all books that are as dull as their readers . .  .

The Upgrade

With the release of the newly updated Walden: A Fluid Text comes plenty of detail, and quite a few major features. SUNY Geneseo’s Fluid Text team has worked primarily to clean up and edit the text, and to work on a new face for the project. Various bugs and textual errors reported by ours users have been amended, and we used this data to forecast how we wanted to improve the webpage for this update, and this is what we’ve done.

Our Walden: A Fluid Text Data Dictionary has been updated, so now TEI experts and novices alike can view the substratum of encoding mark-up–  the usage of TEI elements and attributes, as well as definitions and further usage tips. On a similar note for coders and the curious, our XSLT source code is now available [ziptar.gz].

Support for Thoreau’s journal notes (added by Dr. Paul Schacht’s “Literature and Literary Study in a Digital Age” course students) are now available in our work as Notes studded throughout the text. These journal notes were the earliest conceptions of many famous thoughts and passages found in Walden, jotted down by Thoreau years in advance. If you want to take a look at the student work and how this was done through scholarship and various coding methods for this semester-long undertaking, head over here.

In our polishing, we’ve also overhauled the graphical qualities of Walden: A Fluid Text. Stylistic textual rendering has been tweaked, and the distinctive tables in Economy, the inaugural and often mathematical chapter, are reformatted for easier understanding. Currently, individual columns in the versioning machine layout can now scroll independently of each other as well, so that reader’s can compare different sections of Walden at once.

What’s Next

Screen Shot 2014-12-03 at 11.47.34 AMOur Fluid Text, as the name suggests, is always changing, and we have many more features in mind. In keeping with the possibilities of digital tools, and TEI in particular, we have a planned revamp of the website interface to gild our look with a simplicity inspired by Walden itself. Dr. Paul Schacht plans on involving students in this project through further work in his Digital Studies course. A new users manual is planned to accompany the new look. Special attention will also be paid to accessibility on tablet screens, for scholars who want to read Thoreau in the library and woods alike.

No wonder that Alexander carried the Illiad with him on his expeditions in a precious casket. A written word is the choicest of relics . . . 

 

Picture Perfect! Teaching with Picture Books

picturebooksThe adage “A picture is worth a thousand words” rings especially true when talking about picture books. Anyone who has browsed through bookstore or library shelves can attest to the fact that a compelling photo or illustration on the cover may entice us to pick up a rather dull sounding book. We may ask ourselves “Why is there a skull and crossbones on the cover”, or “what is that woman thinking, swimming with that shark?”

In addition to making texts more appealing the artwork in picture books can make it easier for readers to make sense of the accompanying (sometimes complex) text. This can be particularly helpful to classroom teachers who are looking for ways to introduce complicated or controversial topics to their students.

Milne Library has a large collection of picture books on various subjects and themes such as: geometry, human impact on the earth, disabilities, grief, and acceptance. Using picture books to introduce these topics can help both the teacher (making it easier to cover difficult to understand content) and the students (may engage them with content they normally wouldn’t choose).

All children’s picture books are located on the lower level of the library in the Teacher Education Resource Center (TERC). A few new titles, with summaries (from the catalog/book jacket), are listed below. For help on locating these books visit this site or contact the education librarian, Michelle Costello ([email protected]).

Titles:

  • Bats on Parade by Kathi Appelt — “On a midsummer’s night the Marching Bat Band makes a rare appearance, its members grouped in formations that demonstrate multiplication from two times two up to ten times ten.”
  • A Boy and a Jaguar by Alan Rabinowitz — “The renowned cat conservationist reflects on his early childhood struggles with a speech disorder, describing how he only spoke fluently when he was communicating with animals and how he resolved at a young age to find his voice to be their advocate.”
  • Cloud Spinner by — Michael Catchpool “When the king orders a boy to make him a huge wardrobe out of the clouds in the sky, the boy warns him that it is more than he needs but the king does not listen.”
  • Half a World Away by Libby Gleeson — “When Louie’s best friend Amy moves to the other side of the world, Louie must find a way to reconnect with her.”
  • House Held Up by Trees by Ted Kooser– “Built on a treeless yard by a family who cleared away all the sprouting trees on the property, a house is eventually abandoned and left to deteriorate on a lot that is gradually overrun by wild trees, in a poignant tale of loss, change, and nature’s quiet triumph.”
  • Same, Same, but Different by Jenny Sue Kostecki-Shaw — “Pen pals Elliot and Kailash discover that even though they live in different countries–America and India–they both love to climb trees, have pets, and ride a school bus.”
  • The Tin Forest by Helen Ward– “An old man’s persistent dreams transform a garbage dump into a forest full of life.”
  • Varmints. Part One by Helen Ward & Marc Craste — “When tall buildings and loud noise drown out the sounds of bees in the grass and birds in the sky, one soul cares enough to start over again and help nature thrive.”

 

Cancelled: Celebrating Geneseo Authors Event

EventCancelled
The Celebrating Geneseo Authors event that was to take place at 4:00 today has been postponed due to inclement weather.
Stay tuned for information on the new date and time.

“A Camera in 1888″ Exhibit Opening Tuesday, Nov. 4, 6-7 p.m. in Milne Library

Please join us at the opening of an exhibit featuring the remarkable, often beautiful and historically important photographs of Martha Blow Wadsworth (1864-1934) from Milne Library’s Special Collections.  The event will take place in Milne Library on Tuesday, Nov. 4, from 6-7 p.m., and light refreshments will be served.

camera1888“A Camera in 1888: Martha Blow Wadsworth, Chronicler of American Moments” highlights photographs taken during her travels to Alaska with an Army surveying party, to Panama while the canal was being built, and to the American west and southwest (again with an Army surveying party ) — all in the early 20th-century. Through the talented eye of one local amateur, the exhibit illustrates what the consumer camera, introduced in 1888 by Kodak, made possible. It will be on view through December in the lobby of Milne Library.

Ms. Wadsworth was a native of St. Louis who lived  in Avon, N.Y. with her husband, Herbert Wadsworth (of the prominent Geneseo family).  An avid horsewoman and amateur photographer, she has been described as vivacious, energetic, and adventurous. Thirty-three of her albums, as well as hundreds of glass slides, from which the photographs have been selected were donated to Milne Library in 1976 by nephew-in-law Michael Moukhanoff and are housed with the larger Wadsworth Family Papers collection.

“A Camera in 1888″ was curated by Special Collections Librarian Liz Argentieri and Regina Carra ’15, with assistance from Jack Scott ’06. It is part of the larger campus-wide program, 1888 in America: William Trost Richards’ Seascape Contextualized, which opened Oct. 24 and runs through the end of the semester.

Fall Back! Set Your Clocks Back on Sunday Nov. 2

Daylight Saving Time Ends on Sunday, Nov. 2nd and our clocks will need to be set back 1 hour.  Some of the clocks in the library are controlled by an electronic master clock and will reset automatically, but many are not.  We appreciate your patience as we work to update them!

fall_back

What is Daylight Savings Anyway?
Daylight-savings time is the advancing of the clock, usually in summer time, one hour ahead of the local standard time in order to increase the hours of daylight available at the end of the day.

The idea originated with none other than Benjamin Franklin in the 1700s.  But it didn’t really catch on until WWI when England and Germany put it into practice as a wartime measure for making full use of daylight hours.  By 1925, it became permanent in England.

The U.S. also took advantage of daylight savings for both World Wars, but it didn’t become a permanent fixture for most states until the oil crisis in the mid-1960’s.

Find out more at timeanddate.com.

Pillows/Matresses Raise Awareness of Sexual Assault on Campus

CarryThatWeightTogetherYou may see pillows and/or mattresses carried around campus tomorrow [Wednesday, October 29, 2014]. Students, faculty and staff on college campuses across the country are taking collective action to support survivors of sexual and domestic violence on college campuses by carrying a pillow or mattress.

This national day of action is inspired by the activism and art of Emma Sulkowicz at Columbia University and led by Columbia student activists. Emma carries a mattress with her as part of a performance art piece to protest the dismissal of her rape report by campus officials at Columbia University.

The day of action aims to raise awareness about the prevalence of sexual and domestic violence, advocate for better campus policies, and challenge rape culture. To find out more and share photos of the efforts of students on our campus visit the Carry That Weight website.

Milne’s updates its Ask A Librarian page

Libanswers News Slider1Milne Library’s Ask A Librarian webpage just got a facelift! The new page is better integrated with our chat and library subject guides. Added functionality on this page allows users to search through Frequently Asked Questions, submit a question of their own or contact a reference librarian via phone, text, email, chat, or by scheduling a one-on-one consultation.

Be sure to update your bookmarks to libanswers.geneseo.edu.

Scholarly sources and reliable news sources about the Ebola outbreak

This post was originally published on the Scientific American Blog, Information Culture, on September 29, 2014.

While there has been some high quality news reporting about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, it is also easy to find vague, misleading or erroneous information about the disease and the outbreak. News related to the outbreak may also prompt more folks to explore the scholarly scientific literature on the subject.  The list below contains some reliable information sources on the topic.

The U.S. National Library of Medicine’s Disaster Information Management Research Center released an excellent guide to Ebola information resources. Many of the links in this post are also available from the NLM guide.

General information about the disease

News stories and collections

Scholarly materials

The National Library of Medicine has initiated an Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) for scholarly papers related to Ebola. The EAI is a partnership between the National Library of Medicine (the folks behind the PubMed biomedical research database) and the companies and organizations that publish scholarly articles. The EAI allows healthcare professionals, policy makes, librarians, and others involved in a health disaster event to temporarily access scholarly articles on the topic that would generally only be available to subscribers. Affected folks hoping to access the information need to login at the EAI site, then continue on to PubMed.  Once you get to PubMed, you can limit your search to articles available for free through the program. The current EAI allows access until October 17, 2014.

Many publishers have put together collections of ebola related articles available for free on their websites, including:

Of particular interest is an interactive map and timeline of the outbreak, discussed in detail by Larry Greenemeier on the Scientific American website.

 

The HealthMap of the Ebola outbreak

Governmental websites

This list is only a small portion of the high quality information sources available. Feel free to share your go-to high-quality information resources in the comments.

Leading the Way for Better Library Instruction

Three instructors, five team leaders, 37 participants, 5 regional locations in New York, and 963 miles travelled; this, the winning equation for a summertime road trip of the third Library Instruction Leadership Academy (LILAC).

NYSDr. Brian Morgan of the Ella Shear Cline School of Education joined librarians Michelle Costello and Kim Davies Hoffman, along with many other co-Principal Investigators on the IITG planning team, to design a LILAC like none before. After offering two local instances of the academy (2010 & 2013), meant to train librarians new to instructional roles in foundational pedagogical methods, LILAC 3 aims to widen the audience throughout New York State. The first stage included five full-day workshops (over a two-week period) in various regions of the state, in an attempt to reach as many participants as possible – Potsdam, Saratoga Springs, Highland, Rochester, and Ithaca. Dr. Morgan provided a thorough grounding in pedagogical theory and Michelle and Kim followed with demonstrations of that theory into the practice of library instruction. Students were immersed in the theory as they contemplated their professional content through hands-on and collaborative activities

Giving LILAC participants a three-week break to resume their typical fall semester routine, online modules for the academy picked up on Monday, September 15, beginning with a focus on librarian interactions with students and collaborations with faculty and community members. Three more two-week modules will be spread out until mid-November and participants will culminate their learning with multiple final projects (a progressively developed lesson plan, a usable digital asset that can be used to supplement a class lesson or used to promote library services, and an action plan for a project personalized to each participant’s library).

LILAC 3 is not only meant to educate its participants, but its developers too. Module presenters are experimenting with new technologies to translate the typical LILAC content into asynchronous learning. The regional leaders have been immersed in the LILAC experience since the time of IITG proposal writing, so that they might sustain in future years such professional development opportunities in their local regions.