3D printing now available at the CIT HelpDesk in Milne Library

Stop by Milne Library and look behind the glass of the CIT HelpDesk. There you will find two 3D printers hard at work
creating three-dimensional objects of all sorts. 3D printing is a process of making three-dimensional solid objects from a digital file using a wide range of material like plastic, metal, and ceramics. A 3D printer lays down layer upon layer of material until the object is created.

You can design your own 3D objects using software on the Geneseo lab computers or find ready-to-print STL files on 3D community websites like thingiverse.com and youmagine.com. Many community members on these sites share their designs under a Creative Commons license, so you can use, alter, and print the designs.

The printing cost is based on the weight of the 3D object after it is printed. The cost is 4 cents per gram with a 50-cent service charge and there is a rainbow of colors to choose from.

Geneseo is running a new three-credit experimental course this semester entitled Intro to 3D Modeling and Printing.

PrinterCloseUpTo learn more about CIT’s 3D printing service, including how to submit an object for printing and to learn about the CIT Experimental Lab visit wiki.geneseo.edu/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=105971950 .

Wanna Teach Online @Geneseo?

SummerOnlineAre you interested in teaching online this summer? Want to know what Geneseo’s online education program is all about? Attend our informational panel discussions with Geneseo faculty who have recently taught online.

Tuesday, February 9th
11:30am – 1:00pm
Milne 105

This panel discussion may be of interest to those faculty members submitting the 2016 Online Instruction Curriculum Development Application sent by Dean Savi Iyer.

SUNY Geneseo began offering summer online courses in a limited way in 2008, and the program has grown steadily over years. In this panel discussion, Geneseo faculty members will share their experiences with what worked (as well as what didn’t work). This would be a good session to attend for those faculty members considering offering a new online course in Summer 2016.

Faculty members scheduled to participate in the discussion include:
Kurt Cylke (Sociology)
Jennifer Katz (Psychology)
Cynthia Klima (Languages and Literatures)

However, we encourage EVERYONE and anyone who has taught online to come and talk about your experiences. Please RSVP**.

**Note: rsvp’s are requested for attendance purposes only so we can ensure enough space and food for everyone. If you find that you are able to attend, but have not rsvp’d, you are more than welcome to do so.

Get Yer Board Books Here!

BoardBooksIf you’re looking for the board books to use for lesson planning, be aware that they’ve got a new home in the Teacher’s Education Resource Center. Just take a look at the bright, colorful new shelving unit that just made its way into the center of the collection and have a browse…

Do you like it? Maybe you have some suggestions? Let us know!

Get Reviewing!

SUNY Geneseo is can’t-turn-the-pages-fast-enough-excited to launch NaRMo: National Book Review Month – one day into February and already many have heeded the call to @getreviewing!
NaRMoLytton Smith, a faculty member in the English Department here at SUNY Geneseo, has participated in National Novel Writing Months and National Poetry Writing Months, and is thrilled to see the products of such intensive generative cycles.

But where, he asks, is the space to review all this great contemporary writing?

We’re constantly hearing, for example, about the “death” of poetry, or of experimental writing, or the short-story, or books themselves. As Chrissy Montelli, writing on the Gandy Dancer blog (the SUNY system’s literary magazine) put it: “if you have to keep declaring, over and over, that poetry is dead, it can’t actually be dead.” The reason for repeated attempts to cremate the literary arts often boils down to lack of awareness: the writers of such articles haven’t found the scintillating contemporary writing that would convince them to put down pen, shrug off  misanthropy, and settle down to read some amazing writing, about which they could then write.

That amazing writing is out there, and NaRMo will provide readers with ways to find it, and reviewers with an excuse to shout it from the virtual rooftops.

NaRMo is a grass-roots organization, based at SUNY Geneseo, and dedicated to increasing the number of book reviews of writers from all styles and backgrounds during the month of February. A collaboration between SUNY Geneseo’s English Department and Milne Library, NaRMo intends to link readers through book reviews and to help initiate conversation about books from an assortment of genres including children’s books, drama, non-fiction, fiction and poetry. This is the first year NaRMo is up and running, and we encourage everyone to get reading and get reviewing! Whether it’s through the official NaRMo site, via a literary journal, or on an online store: post a review of a recent book you want the world to know about.

Please join in, whether on the NaRMo websiteTwitterFacebook, or in whatever part of the internet or the physical world makes sense to you: reviews on online retailers, notecards in people’s mailboxes, letters to friends.

 

 

Plagiarism Workshops

PlagiarismpicFeb10 and11Students plagiarize for many reasons, including procrastination, panic, and lack of understanding about how to paraphrase, quote, and cite properly. In this workshop taught by librarians, students will discuss plagiarism scenarios, understand the importance of using original ideas and language, and learn how to incorporate paraphrases and quotes into their writing.
Instructor: Librarians Milne Library

Wednesday, February 10, 3:30 – 4:30 pm in Milne 104

OR

Thursday, February 11, 6:00 – 7:00 pm in Milne 104

[Register for Ruby Certificate Credit]

Plagiarism Workshops

PlagiarismpicFEb4and5Students plagiarize for many reasons, including procrastination, panic, and lack of understanding about how to paraphrase, quote, and cite properly. In this workshop taught by librarians, students will discuss plagiarism scenarios, understand the importance of using original ideas and language, and learn how to incorporate paraphrases and quotes into their writing.
Instructor: Librarians Milne Library

Thursday, February 4, 4:00 – 4:50 pm in Milne 104

OR

Friday, February 5, 2:30 – 3:30 pm in Milne 104

[Register for Ruby Certificate Credit]

Group Support/Group Discussions

KelseyMattDiscussionsAll groups will meet in Bailey on
Wednesday January 27, 2016
All College Hour – 2:30pm-3:45pm
Students:                   Bailey 102
Student athletes:   Bailey 103
Faculty:                       Bailey 104

Staff:                             Bailey 101

Grief and Campus Counseling Services

Grief is a complicated emotion that affects us in many different ways.** It can be messy, confusing, prolonged, consuming and can sneak up on us at odd times. Grief can make us think differently about the world around us, about our safety and our loved ones. It can be all of these things, or none of them. It can change with time.

As we near the end of a very difficult week, Lauderdale Center for Student Health and Counseling would like to offer a list of resources for you to refer to now, or in the future. We would also like to encourage you to look after one another, pay attention to the signs and signals associated with prolonged grief, and to seek support whenever you are are in need.

Lifeline (general support or support for suicidal thoughts): 1-800-310-1160

Mobile Crisis of Livingston County (24/7 crisis support and evaluation) 585-255-0288
Pathways (general support from a student peer advocate): 585-237-8860 or online chat
Off campus therapists
: http://www.geneseo.edu/health/off-campus_referral
Domestic Violence 24-hour Hotline: (888) 252-9360, http://www.chancesandchanges.org/
Wyoming County Crisis/Information and Referral Hotline: (800) 786-3300
Upcoming Group Support/Group Discussion for students:
Wednesday January 27, 2016
All College Hour – 2:30pm-3:45pm
Bailey 102

Upcoming Group Support/Group Discussion for student athletes:
Wednesday January 27, 2016
All College Hour – 2:30pm-3:45pm
Bailey 103

Additional counselors available for walk in appointments:

March 7th – 11th from 9am-5pm (week before Spring break)
May 2nd – 13th from 9am-5pm (week before and during final exams)
May 14th (graduation day)

​Faculty and Staff Resources:​
Counseling Services is available for consultations on Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday from 8:00am-5:00pm and Tuesday from 8:00am-7:00pm in Lauderdale.
NYS Employee Assistance Program (during the day): (585) 245-5740
NYS Employee Assistance Program (after hours): 1-800-822-0244
Off campus therapist referrals: 1-800-THERAPIST (1-800-843-7274)
Upcoming Group Support/Group Discussion for faculty:
Wednesday January 27, 2016
All College Hour – 2:30pm-3:45pm

Bailey 104

Upcoming Group Support/Group Discussion for staff:

Wednesday January 27, 2016
All College Hour – 2:30pm-3:45pm
Bailey 101

All:
If you are in need of support that is not provided on this list, please contact Counseling Services at 585-245-5716.

As this semester continues we hope that you will pay attention to your own internal cues for stress, anxiety, depression and grief and, instead of struggling alone, will look to us for support and guidance.  We also hope that you will look out for one another, share your concern, and alert someone who can help.

You are never alone.

[**The text of this post comes from an email from Erin Halligan-Avery in Lauderdale Center for Student Health and Counseling.]

Pilot: What is VoiceThread? We Need Your Help!

VThreadAre you looking for new ways to engage students? SUNY Geneseo is piloting a trial of VoiceThread and needs your feedback.

VoiceThread is an interactive collaborative learning tool that can be used to enhance student engagement outside of the classroom or in online environments. With VoiceThread, instructors and/or students can create, share, and comment on images, PowerPoint presentations, videos, audio files, documents, and PDFs using microphone, webcam, text, phone, and audio-file upload. At SUNY Geneseo, VoiceThread is an external tool that integrates into myCourses.

VoiceThread can be used in many different ways to enhance classroom learning experiences. Use it for flipping instruction, discussions outside of class, critiquing work, remediation, or practicing language skills.

A couple of examples to consider (more below):

Accessing VoiceThread

You may access VoiceThread in two ways: in myCourses and through Geneseo’s VoiceThread Website.

myCourses access:  Adding VoiceThread to your course

  • Navigate to your course.
  • Click “Add Content”.
  • Select “External Tool”.
  • Give the activity a title.
  • For tool provider, select “VoiceThread”.
  • Check the box that says “Enable grading”.
  • Save changes.

For more information on how to create your first thread visit – https://voicethread.com/howto/angel/

 

Geneseo VoiceThread Website:

Faculty and students are also able to create a Voicethread without using Angel, visit https://geneseo.voicethread.com and register with a geneseo.edu email account.

 

VoiceThread Support Team:

If you would like to learn more about VoiceThread or want assistance setting it up for your course, contact:

Brandon West: [email protected]

Michelle Costello: [email protected]

 

Additional Links

Learn more about VoiceThread’s Features:

Additional Examples of VoiceThread in the Higher Ed Classroom:

 

Writing in College: From Competence to Excellence [an Open SUNY Textbook]

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Writing in College: From Competence to Excellence By Amy Guptill, with contributions by Aly Button, Peter Farrell, Kaethe Leonard, and Timothée Pizarro.

Please join me in congratulating Amy Guptill on her publication of Writing in College: From Competence to Excellence, the newest Open SUNY Textbook!

Many high school students have mastered writing conventions but still struggle to understand and meet the expectations at the college level. Other students, perhaps out of school for a number of years, are getting reacquainted with academic writing while working to meet college-level challenges. Writing in College demystifies college-level expectations, helping students see the purpose behind the varied writing assignments they face.

Guptill skillfully positions specific and applicable advice about college writing within the larger framework of transitioning to the culture of the academy and college-level expectations. In addition, chapters can be read independently and assigned separately, and each is accompanied by further resources, suggested exercises, and advice from other student writers.

Writing in College: From Competence to Excellence

 Available as ebook and PDF downloads, as well as online, at: textbooks.opensuny.org/writing-in-college-from-competence-to-excellence/

 

About the Textbook

Writing in College: From Competence to Excellence is designed for students who have largely mastered the conventions of high-school level writing and are now rising to meet more the advanced expectations of college. Students will find in Writing in College a warm invitation to think of themselves as full, self-motivated members of the academic community. With concise explanations, clear multi-disciplinary examples and empathy for the challenges of student life, this short textbook both explains the purposes behind college-level writing and offers indispensable advice for organization and expression.

 

About the Author

Amy Guptill is an Associate Professor of Sociology at The College at Brockport, SUNY where she has a joint appointment with the Delta College Program, an alternative interdisciplinary General Education option. Her research focuses on spatial and structural shifts in agriculture and food systems with recent work on innovative agricultural marketing. She teaches courses in the sociology of food, development and globalization, community and social change, social statistics and college writing. In addition to Writing In College: From Competence to Excellence, she is the coauthor of a recent college textbook entitled Food & Society: Principles and Paradoxes (Malden, MA: Polity, 2012).

 

Value of Open Access Textbooks

The author is thrilled to offer this book as an open textbook. The cost of commercial textbooks is an urgent and growing problem, and all students should have easy access to advice about how to get the most out of the hundreds of pages of writing they’ll do over the course of a four-year degree.

Licensed for reuse and remix, the Open SUNY Textbooks are a valuable addition to the open access textbook community. Freely available, the open access content is peer reviewed by fellow instructors and scholars for quality and then copy-edited before publication. Open textbooks are just one component of the open educational resources movement (OER) and provide high quality, reusable material for course instructors to create cost savings for students and institutions.

 

About Open SUNY Textbooks

The SUNY Textbook program is a creative means to improving access to educational materials while fostering a community of resources that spans disciplines and encourages interdisciplinary study. SUNY Libraries and faculty are leading SUNY’s open textbook publishing initiative and have already saved thousands of dollars for SUNY students. Having published 12 free online textbooks, with 14 more planned in the next 18 months, this innovative multi-institutional program is lowering the cost of textbooks for students in New York and beyond.

Open textbooks are available to everyone free of charge. Over 50,000 downloads of Open SUNY Textbooks occurred between February 1, 2015-December 14, 2015, with visitors and readers from all over the world. For program details, please visit http://textbooks.opensuny.org