Just how busy is Milne Library?

Update: Database issue workaround

foxtatobelieves

Update: My apologies for the wait on this workaround. I’ve been in close contact with the technical team at EBSCO to find the source of the problem.

You can access EBSCO databases using this link, which will get you to our A-Z list. All the links in our Subject Guides will work as well.

As always, please let me know if something isn’t working for you. Research is a messy process, but it’s my job to minimize frustration from working in different resources. Good luck with finals, and remember: tiny foxtato believes in you. You can do the thing!

-Angela Galvan

 

Original post follows –

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Milne library subscribes to several dozen EBSCO databases. Reported problems range from slow load times to complete inability to access resources.

We know this impacts heavily used resources at Geneseo. We are in contact with EBSCO and will provide updates as we receive them.

Databases affected include, but are not limited to:
  • Academic Search Complete
  • America: History & Life
  • Anthropology Plus
  • Business Source Complete
  • CINAHL Plus with Full Text
  • Education Source
  • Environment Complete
  • ERIC
  • GeoRef
  • Historical Abstracts
  • Humanities Source
  • MEDLINE with Full Text
  • Military & Government Collection
  • MLA International Bibliography
  • Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection
  • Religion and Philosophy Collection
  • Social Sciences Full Text
  • Teacher Reference Center
 Update

Milne will be open 24/5 during Finals Week

24 hours image

CC-BY image courtesy of Flickr user Marcin Wichary

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be in the library in the middle of the night? You’ll soon get your chance to find out!

Milne Library will be open 24 hours a day during Finals Week, with the minor exception of Friday and Saturday nights. This is a pilot program in response to student requests heard loudly and clearly!

  • Study Day, May 4: Open at 7:30 am and remain open until late Friday night (1 am)
  • Saturday, May 7: Open at 9:30 am and close at 1 am
  • Sunday, May 8: Open at 9:30 am and remain open until Wednesday at 7 pm.

See the table below for specific details:

Date Hours
  Wednesday, May 4 (Study Day)   7:30 am to 24 hours
  Thursday, May 5   24 hours
  Friday, May 6   24 hours to 1:00 am
  Saturday, May 7   9:30 am to 1:00am
  Sunday, May 8   9:30 am to 24 hours
  Monday, May 9   24 hours
  Tuesday, May 10   24 hours
  Wednesday, May 11   24 hours to 10:00 pm

 

Igniting a passion for STEM with rich and engaging resources

STEM

Image credit: FlickrUser natàlia i xavier de Lu2

Are you interested in learning more about STEM activities and resources. Would you like to explore ways to incorporate STEM across the curriculum with the goal of building student understanding?

Connecting hands-on STEM activities with books, games or manipulatives can be a great way to strengthen understanding and literacy skills while inspiring inquiry and creativity.

Milne Library has recently acquired a collection of STEM books, games, and manipulatives. These high quality resources illustrate activities that encourage scientific and artistic creativity and help increase student learning.

A few items found in the collection include:

Books
Getting the most out of makerspaces to create with 3-D printers by Nicki Peter Petrikowski
High-tech DIY projects with 3D printing by Maggie Murphy
Lego awesome ideas by Daniel Lipkowitz
STEM to story: enthralling and effective lesson plans for grades 5-8 by Jennifer Traig

Manipulatives
Hands-on soft geometric solids
Molymod organic teacher set
Lego Education. Duplo: Animal bingo kit
STEM: simple machines STEM activity set

Games
Ion: a compound building game by John J. Coveyou
Prime climb: the beautiful, colorful, mathematical game
Pandemic by Matt Leacock

To learn more about STEM resources contact the Education Librarian, Michelle Costello ([email protected]).

In addition, read the following Education Update article by ASCD, “Teaching and Learning Resources for STEM Education.”

Apple, the FBI, and your phone.

via flicker, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

via flicker, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Over time, phones become extensions of ourselves. There’s a lot on your phone: the entertainment you like, texts to friends, family, and partners, your search history, thousands of pictures and video. Although this doesn’t seem like much, your phone reveals where you’ve been, who you’re with, and what you care about.

Apple is appearing in the news because of a San Bernardino county-owned iPhone confiscated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. In general, phones issued by a workplace have higher level security features, and the FBI would like for Apple to create a backdoor for law enforcement to access this particular phone. The FBI’s request is insists it will only apply to this phone, one time. This is oversimplifying the situation for the sake of this writing–a more detailed explanation of the technology and its implications is available here.

The government tends to frame this argument as a trade-off: less privacy for greater security, and who doesn’t want more safety? But, any backdoor developed for law enforcement—even in secret—would be exploited, as data breaches happen all the time without our devices being handed over to investigators.

Apple has confronted the FBI about this before—an article in Wired suggests a handful of other cases. The FBI choosing this incident to lean harder on Apple is masterful. The narrative has all the components driving people to hand over their privacy: terrorists, violence, and investigators just trying to do their jobs in the interest of safety. But who pays for the development of features to bypass operating system security? What does Apple pay for developers to create the impossible, unhackable feature? What does the public pay in access to private spaces?

In security, it’s never about just one phone and cases create precedence which can ultimately erode privacy. Like Barbara Fister I wonder: what is the public interest here? Like Jason Griffey I wonder what I can do as a librarian to protect the interests of my users?

Over the next few weeks, I’ll be writing more about surveillance, privacy, and what students can do to empower themselves.

If you’d like to learn more about privacy online but aren’t sure where to start, try the Library Freedom Project’s basic class in online privacy.

If you’d like to encrypt a device, check out the tutorials at Electronic Frontier Foundation.

The library uses Google Analytics for many projects. The library doesn’t use any identifying information, but you should still have a choice. Here is how you can opt out if you’d prefer not to be tracked.

Dr. Walter Harding to be Subject of Exhibit

HardingSlider

Dr. Walter Harding (1917-1996)

Library Intern Demi Monachino and Milne Library’s Special Collections Librarian, Liz Argentieri, are currently hard at work creating an exhibit dedicated to one of the college’s most distinguished and influential professors, Dr. Walter Harding, who was on the Geneseo faculty from 1956 to 1983. Dr. Harding was one of the world’s leading Thoreau scholars, and we find ourselves up to our elbows in the many essays, articles, and tributes he wrote centering on Henry David Thoreau (an original Transcendentalist and the author of Walden). Among all of these scholarly documents on Thoreau, however, we are also finding some truly amazing information on Dr. Harding himself.

This man, who accomplished so much in a lifetime and amassed one of the world’s largest collection of Thoreauviana, was a large influence on not just the Geneseo community, but the world. It is somewhat hard to believe that a professor from our small college town in western New York was sent to Japan by the State Department to teach Thoreau there, and received letters from the likes of President Jimmy Carter, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Albert Einstein, just to name a few. For us, Dr. Harding is truly starting to come alive once again through these testimonials and remnants of his legacy, found in our own Milne Library and in the Thoreau Society’s Walter Harding Collection at Walden Woods, where we’ll be visiting later this spring.

Walter Harding wrote the definitive biography of Thoreau

Walter Harding wrote the definitive biography of Henry David Thoreau

Image courtesy of the Thoreau Society

Image courtesy of the Thoreau Society

The goal of the exhibit, which will be on display in Milne during the weeks surrounding the annual Walter Harding Lecture this fall, is to share with current Geneseo students and faculty the kind of awe and pride Dr. Harding’s life and work has inspired in us. We want to reintroduce to the community this remarkable man and scholar that many have never had the pleasure to meet (and some may have never heard of), and to open their eyes to a man who, despite having such a large global impact, always remained humble. In this presentation of Dr. Harding’s knowledge, wit, and accomplishment, we only hope that we do justice to his legacy.

~ Article written by Demi Monachino

Pajama Party!

jammies

On Friday, April 8th, Milne Library will host a Pajama Party Story Time Celebration for children and their caregivers! This event is sponsored by the Young Children’s Council* and students from the School of Education. Any age is welcome, though these stories are geared toward the under-10 age group (appropriate for preschoolers).

Story Time (performed by members of the Young Children’s Council) will last from 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm (a change from past events), with refreshments, songs and crafts. Children are encouraged to wear their favorite pajamas! The event will take place in the Teacher Education Resource Center, located on the lower-level of Milne Library.

For more information or to RSVP (walk-ins are welcome!) send an email to Kylie Sitar – [email protected] or Michelle Costello – [email protected]

*The Young Children’s Council is sponsored by the Student Association


Yoga & Self-Acceptance: Meet the Woman Behind “Embrace Every Angle”

YogaTalkTODAYJOIN US for a Yin Yoga session (bring your own mat!), and
stay for Liza’s talk about her journey to self acceptance and the
creation of this community project.

5:00 p.m. Yin Yoga** with Liza Savage-Katz
7:00 p.m. Accepting the Self; A Journey.. featuring Liza Savage-Katz

Wednesday, March 23rd
Milne Library, Room 213

LSKMilne Library is currently exhibiting “Embrace Every Angle,” a
collection of over 50 photographs by 12 local photographers/artists.
The mission was to create fine art photographs and paintings
celebrating yoga as a holistic approach to expression, creativity and
existence, as well as to raise awareness of the beauty and artistry
abundant in Rochester. In demonstrating that artistic expression and individual and community well-being go hand in hand, Liza and friends brought together the fitness and arts industry to create a project for the betterment of both our local, as well as our global community. After years of struggling with an eating disorder and Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD), this project has also been journey of body acceptance
and self-love for Liza.

**YIN YOGA is a practice designed to help you sit longer, and more
comfortably, in meditation by stretching connective tissue around the
joints (mainly the knees, pelvis, sacrum, and spine). A passive
practice, Yin Yoga involves variations of seated and supine poses
typically held for 3 to 5 minutes, accessing deeper layers of fascia.

About the Exhibit: Embrace Every Angle

Local business owner, yoga and fitness instructor, producer and
artist, Liza Savage-Katz, has collaborated with 12 different
photographers/artists and with tremendous support from many local
businesses, has created the Embrace Every Angle project.  This
includes photographic prints of over 50 ‘Embrace Every Angle’ poses,
shot throughout Rochester and surrounding areas (including here on
campus!).

You can see more about the project here on Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/embraceeveryangle/

Local Resources: Gay Alliance of Genesee Valley

GAGV

Photo of the GAGV’s LGBTQ Resource Center’s new library.

If you are new to Western New York, you might not be privy to the city’s extensive history in the LGBTQ movement that formed what is known today as the Gay Alliance of Genesee Valley (GAGV). The GAGV has been monumental in making Rochester a safer place to live for those who do not fall into a binary with regard to sexuality or gender expression.

You may have witnessed the impact of the GAGV right here on-campus: the rainbow signs hanging by many faculty and staff’s offices indicate they have received SafeZone Training. This training serves as an educational tool to educate supportive faculty, staff, and students on LGBTQ terminology, issues, and questions.

Recently, the GAGV has opened the doors of its new LGBTQ Resource Center at 100 College Avenue in Rochester. This resource center serves an educational and safe space for LGBTQ individuals as well as their allies. The center features a library, archives, and hosts weekly social events.

  • The library contains over 10,000 fiction and nonfiction books, periodicals, and DVDs, which are all available for you to borrow. You can browse the center’s collection online via LibraryThing.
  • The archives have plenty of historical material that help document the progression of the LGBTQ movement in Rochester, including The Empty Closet, the original publication used to advance the rights of so many individuals in Western New York.
  • The resource centers hours are:
    Monday-Friday 9:00am-5:00 pm &
    Wednesdays, 6:00-8:00 pm.
    Everyone is welcome!
GAGVStaff

The volunteer staff of the GAGV Library & Archives.

If you cannot make it all the way up to Rochester, no worries! Milne Library and SUNY Geneseo have many available LGBTQ resources. You can find many books on LGBTQ topics in Milne’s collection as well as specialized LGBTQ research databases.  Aiden Cropsey, Coordinator of LGBTQ Programs and Services, along with the student-led Pride Alliance, host several events throughout the year, and even have their own floating book collection. You can also like and follow them on Facebook!

All photos and images used with permission from the Gay Alliance of Genesee Valley.

~ written by Brandon West

Sonja Livingston, “Queen of the Fall”: Author Visit & Book Discussion

SliderVisitMilne Library and the Geneseo Literary Forum are proud to support the 2016 “If All of Rochester Reads the Same Book…” Queen of the Fall: A Memoir of Girls & Goddesses by Sonja Livingston. Livingston will be in Geneseo on Monday, March 7th at 6pm in the College Union Ballroom. Ms. Livingston will read from her work and sign books after the presentation. The author will also visit various classes throughout the day. Join us for an engaging reading and refreshments!

In addition, Milne Library & TLC are hosting a book discussion which will take place on Tuesday, March 1st from 4-5:30pm in Milne 208.  Coffee, tea, and snacks will be provided. To participate, simply follow the link and sign up. Once you’ve submitted your registration, stop into Milne 214 (Director’s office) to pick up your copy of the book.  Please contact Chris Shute at (585) 245-5591 if you have questions.

For more information on the “If All of Rochester Reads the Same Book…” program, please visit Writers & Books at http://wab.org

BookArtAbout the book: Whether pulled from the folds of memory, channeled through the icons of Greek mythology and Roman Catholicism, or filtered through the lens of pop culture, Sonja Livingston’s Queen of the Fall: A Memoir of Girls & Goddesses considers the lives of women. Exploring the legacies of those she has crossed paths with in life and in the larger culture, Livingston weaves together strands of memory with richly imagined vignettes to explore becoming a woman in late 1980s and early 1990s America.

Along the way, the award-winning memoirist brings us face-to-face with herself as an inner-city girl—trying to imagine a horizon beyond poverty, fearful of her fertility and the limiting arc of teenage pregnancy. Livingston looks at the lives of those she’s known: friends who’ve gotten themselves into “trouble,” girls who tell their school counselor small lies out of necessity and pain and a mother whose fruitfulness seems, at times, biblical. Livingston interacts with icons such as Susan B. Anthony, the Virgin Mary, and Ally McBeal to mine the terrain of her own femininity, fertility, and longing.Queen of the Fall is a dazzling meditation on loss, possibility, and, ultimately, what it means to be human.

About the Author: Sonja Livingston’s first book, the memoir Ghostbread, won an AWP Book Prize for Nonfiction and has been adopted for use by classrooms around the nation. Her writing has been honored with a NYFA Fellowship, an Iowa Review Award, and an Arts & Letters Essay Prize, as well as grants from Vermont Studio Center and the Deming Fund for Women.

Her work has appeared in many literary journals including the Iowa Review, Alaska Quarterly Review, Southeast Review, Brevity, and AGNI online, and is anthologized in several texts on writing, including Short Takes, The Truth of the Matter, The Curious Writer, and Brief Encounters. An assistant professor in the MFA Program at the University of Memphis, Sonja is married to the artist Jim Mott and divides her time between Tennessee and New York State.

 For more information, visit http://sonjalivingston.com

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